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What's Cooking? 
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
charityjones89 wrote:
I also avoid soy products so I use almond milk or rice milk, whichever is cheaper when I go to the store.
Have you tried coconut milk? And speaking of that, I happened to find TWO MORE previously forgotten cans of coconut product! They are labled 'Young Coconut Meat in Syrup.' I can't recall purchasing them... will update when I try. Tonight it was Eggplant Boats. This is the eggplant equivalent of stuffed peppers. Scoop out the inside of the eggplants (which could then be used as a raft for a small pet, hence the name) and parboil the outer, skin-part, of the eggplant to the point of it losing its crispness. At this point, add put whatever you like in a stuffed pepper to the eggplant. Of course, some previous cooking time may be desired for these ingredients. I like including the inner part of the eggplant in an olive oil stir-fry. Anyway, when you've finished with all this, place the mixture in the boats and bake for a short amount of time at a moderate setting. Any remaining stir-fry portion I like to use as an ocean to float my boats.


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Fri Jul 08, 2011 6:33 pm
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Roasted Yucca Root

A root vegetable that should be a more familiar item. Peel the skin off, slice yucca into wedges. Toss in a mixture of oil, garlic powder, and chili powder (or the seasonings of your choice), bake at 475F until the top begins to brown. The bottom half will be more brown. I prefer this method rather than fliping the wedges over... less work. Potato and Plantain wedges are also nice. Some like it hot. I prefer them with salsa.


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Wed Jul 20, 2011 8:49 pm
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Kevin, A Yucca is a large exotic-looking garden plant here in the UK. I looks a bit like a bromeliad, pineappley type thing, with enormous alien looking flowers. They don't look right in English gardens imo, so I would like to eat them. Never seen the root for sale in shops. I am intrigued.

Yesterday evening our supper was as follows:-

Chicken, Avocado and Almond Salad

These quantities are based on 2 adults
Sweet potato 1 x large sweet potato, peeled and cut into small chunks
Chicken breast (skinless and boneless) 280 grams
Green beans 100 grams, trimmed and halved
Cider vinegar 1 x tbsp
Dijon mustard 1 x tsp
Olive oil (extra virgin) ½ x tbsp
Avocado 1 x avocado stoned, peeled and thickly sliced
Watercress 50 grams
Whole almonds 30 grams

1. Preheat the grill to medium-high. Boil the sweet potato for 15 mins, or until soft.
2. Meanwhile, grill the chicken for 10 mins, or until cooked, turning halfway. Then slice into strips and set aside.
3. Also meanwhile, steam the green beans for 7 mins, or until bright green and tender, but with bite.
4. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, mustard and oil to make a dressing. Then toss the avocado in the dressing, coating each slice well.
5. Add the watercress, sweet potato, chicken, green beans and almonds to a mixing bowl. Tip in the avocado and dressing. Toss well to combine and then serve up.

I am not a great fan of salads, but this was lovely. Watercress and Sweet potato is a heavenly combination.

We ate fresh raspberries with raspberry yoghurt to follow.


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Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:01 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Kevin wrote:
charityjones89 wrote:
I also avoid soy products so I use almond milk or rice milk, whichever is cheaper when I go to the store.
Have you tried coconut milk? And speaking of that, I happened to find TWO MORE previously forgotten cans of coconut product! They are labled 'Young Coconut Meat in Syrup.' I can't recall purchasing them... will update when I try.


I love coconut! I also try to avoid using dairy products and try to minimize the soy products I use. I have recently discovered coconut oil and coconut butter which I will put on toast. It takes a little getting used to, though.
I love coconut milk, and recently ate at a Thai restaurant where they had a drink of "roasted young coconut" which was yummy and had little chunks of coconut floating around in it. I had never had that before. Maybe this is what you have in your cupboard.
Coconut ice cream is also very good.



Thu Jul 21, 2011 11:14 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Penelope wrote:
Kevin, A Yucca is a large exotic-looking garden plant here in the UK. I looks a bit like a bromeliad, pineappley type thing, with enormous alien looking flowers. They don't look right in English gardens imo, so I would like to eat them. Never seen the root for sale in shops. I am intrigued.
And I've never seen them growing in a garden. Looking at picutures of them now I think we're talking about the same thing. It has an unusual taste, though not an overwhelming one... I like it. Ahh garden talk... my worst season ever... drought and heat... should've grown cotton. My onions are doing reasonably well but everything else has died.

Last night was oatmeal. Need to get to the store. Your recipes are so detailed! I'm wondering, do you plan your meals in advance?


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Fri Jul 22, 2011 5:22 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Lois wrote:
I love coconut! I also try to avoid using dairy products and try to minimize the soy products I use. I have recently discovered coconut oil and coconut butter which I will put on toast. It takes a little getting used to, though.
I love coconut milk, and recently ate at a Thai restaurant where they had a drink of "roasted young coconut" which was yummy and had little chunks of coconut floating around in it. I had never had that before. Maybe this is what you have in your cupboard.
Coconut ice cream is also very good.

It seems like they're similar though I think this was too rich to enjoy on its own - at least I found it to be. I mixed some curry powder in and added some rice, onions, and whatnot. I have had coconut drink with bits of coconut floating in it. EDIT: There is a coconut treat I like that is popular here. I can't recall what exactly all the ingredients are (there aren't many) but basically it cocunut shavings bonded together by some sort of syrupy agent (corn syrup I'm guessing) and it makes for a nice afternoon snack. It's colored red, white, and green to resemble the mexican flag.


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Fri Jul 22, 2011 5:35 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
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Kevin said:

Your recipes are so detailed! I'm wondering, do you plan your meals in advance?


Not exactly, I base my meals on what is selling for a reduced price at our co-op. But I have a pattern to the week's meals. Like Monday something with fried/roast potatoes, Tuesday something with pasta, Wednesday a fish dish, Thursday a casserole or salad, Friday is almost always curry, Saturday we eat out or have take-away, pizza, Chinese or Indian, whatever, and of course Sunday we always have a traditional Sunday Roast and a pudding for desert. This means we often have cold roast meat with Monday's fried potatoes. I have used this pattern for years and the family never seemed to notice. :D

The reason my recipes are so detailed is that I also use a website called 'Spoonfed Suppers' which sends you a supper recipe for every day and a shopping list once a week. It is great for healthy food and tasty and unusual meals. I use it when it fits in with whatever I have in stock. We are very foodie here.....When I get Christmas and Birthday presents, they are almost always food....hampers or wine.....

.....Which is why I am currently dieting!! LOL

http://www.spoonfedsuppers.com/


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Fri Jul 22, 2011 6:23 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Kevin wrote:
There is a coconut treat I like that is popular here. I can't recall what exactly all the ingredients are (there aren't many) but basically it cocunut shavings bonded together by some sort of syrupy agent (corn syrup I'm guessing) and it makes for a nice afternoon snack. It's colored red, white, and green to resemble the mexican flag.


That sounds really good!



Fri Jul 22, 2011 9:48 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Ingredients For Coconut Ice:


340g desiccated coconut
340g icing sugar
400g tin of condensed milk
Optional food colouring


Cooking Directions For Coconut Ice:


1. Place the condensed milk into a bowl and add the icing sugar. Beat well then mix in the desiccated coconut. The mixture will get firm and difficult to stir but persevere until everything is all combined.


Maw Broon from the Sunday Post has published a cookbook full of her favourite Scottish and family recipes. Read More About It!


2. Divide the mixture into two (add optional food colourings to each) and spread into an 8inch square tin giving two coloured layers and allow to set overnight (time for a wee dram!)


Warning - This goes straight to the hips!!


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Fri Jul 22, 2011 9:52 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
[quote="Penelope"]Ingredients For Coconut Ice:


340g desiccated coconut
340g icing sugar
400g tin of condensed milk
Optional food colouring


/quote]


Oh my gosh, this sounds good! Here is a recipe that I got from my aunt.

Moist and Creamy Coconut Cake

1 package yellow cake mix or pudding included cake mix
1 1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
2 cups flaked coconut
3 1/2 cups or one 8 oz Cool Whip, thawed
Prepare cake mix as directed in 9 X 13 pan. Cool 15 min. Then poke holes down through cake with utility fork. Meanwhile, combine milk, sugar and 1/2 cup coconut in saucepan. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 1 minute. Carefully spoon over warm cake, allowing liquid to soak down through holes. Cool Completely. Fold 1/2 cup coconut into whipped topping and spread over cake. Sprinkle with remaining coconut. Chill overnight. Store leftover cake in the refrigerator.



This is really good. I use coconut milk in place of regular milk. And, I am trying to figure out a substitution for the Cool Whip that is non dairy. I don't really like the soy whip stuff. I'm thinking that maybe just a nice, moist frosting would work just as well, but haven't tried it yet.



Last edited by Lois on Fri Jul 22, 2011 10:31 am, edited 1 time in total.



Fri Jul 22, 2011 10:28 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
This is my rainy Sunday project.


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Sun Oct 02, 2011 8:17 pm
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Quote:
Saffron wrote:

This is my rainy Sunday project.


Wow, that loaf looks splendid. The sesame seeds will give it a nice crisp crust. Unfortunately, my efforts often have a very hard and tough crust, i.e. concrete overcoat and doughy middle. Unless I make it in the breadmaker which then often is too sweet for our taste.

We have been having inseasonably hot sunny weather for this time of year and so we had a barbecue with the kids on Saturday instead of the Sushi which we'd bought and planned for. Since Sushi doesn't keep for long, we ate it on Sunday evening, which meant I didn't cook a roast dinner, most unusual for a Sunday. So tonight I'm doing a pigeon casserole.

I should have posted on here about last Sunday's dinner because we had grouse. I braised a brace of grouse and they were really quite something. We can't usually get grouse in the game season (which has just started here), they are always too expensive for our game supplier to stock with any confidence. Anyway, last weekend he had them at £5 each and they are so delicious. A sweetish dark meat, rather like wild duck (mallard) but juicier, I thought. I made really sumptuous soup with the carcasses too.

I'm not greatly fond of wood-pigeon but OH likes it, so he gets the meat and I quite like the gravey with some carefully cooked veg. I'll consult Mrs. Beeton on its preparation although she wasn't much help with the grouse as she suggested roasting it on a spit in front of a brisk fire, which I suppose meant a barbecue, LOL. Wrong weekend Mrs. B.


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Mon Oct 03, 2011 3:57 am
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
This recipe is not nearly as classy as most I have seen posted here. In fact, it would probably be considered a sort of “Joe Sixpack” recipe in the US, but it is unique and, for a long time, was considered “secret” as well. Plus, it involves a cooking technique I had never heard of before we managed to wrangle the recipe out of a disgruntled former cook at the greasy spoon where my family has been eating for several decades now. The greasy spoon is called Coney Island, and it is one of a few similar spots scattered around the US that serve a specific type of chili dog. The chili is not like what most folks would expect on a chili dog, in that it is Greek in origin, contains no beans, and is not tomato-based. Instead, it consists of a finely crumbled, highly spiced ground beef that must be cooked in three phases over a period of five hours in order to develop its unique taste and texture. This is one of the reasons that, try as we might, we were never able to even come close to duplicating it ourselves until we discovered the original recipe.

One other thing I should mention about this is that, because many people are used to the standard chili dog served in thousands of restaurants around the world, some folks might not care for it at first. However, after eating a couple of these dogs, something akin to an addiction seems to occur, and many people ultimately become hooked on them. In fact, if you are lucky enough to find a restaurant or diner that serves these chili dogs, you will note that, around lunch time, they are jammed, often with waiting lines extending onto the sidewalks.

In addition to the uniqueness of the chili itself, there is a specific way the dogs are served, and that is with only raw chopped onions and yellow mustard—never catsup. In fact, at our Coney Island, they charge extra for catsup, in order to discourage people from requesting it.

Finally, let me throw in a note of caution by saying that this is not a recipe that can be successfully created by altering anything, whether it be ingredients or cooking procedure. Failure to follow the cooking directions exactly may result in something edible, but it certainly won't resemble the real thing. Do not attempt to speed up the cooking time, throw in substitutes (onion powder or dried onions instead of fresh, Tabasco instead of peppers, etc.), fry the ground beef, or fail to execute the cook-and-let-sit procedure. The only alteration I have made to the original recipe is to use low-fat ground beef, which seems to have no effect on the taste or texture at all.

All that said, here is the recipe for . . .

AUTHENTIC CONEY ISLAND CHILI DOGS

Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds of ground beef (low fat if desired)
1 huge Spanish onion chopped
3 tablespoons of chili powder
1 small can tomato sauce
1 tablespoon salt/salt substitute & 2 teaspoons pepper (to taste)

Bouquet Garni
2 crumbled dried red peppers or equivalent
32 whole allspice
3 bay leaves

First, crumble 1-1/2 half pounds of (low-fat if you prefer) ground beef into a cold Dutch oven and cover with cold water. Consistency is of utmost importance in creating the chili, which has a very fine texture with no discernible lumps of meat. To achieve this smooth texture, use your fingers to squeeze and crumble the meat under the water until all the tiny meat particles are separated. Next, stir in the chopped onion, and bring the mixture to a boil.

Meanwhile, prepare a bouquet garni containing the allspice, bay leaves and dried red peppers. (To make a bouquet garni, cut two or three layers of cheesecloth into about an eight-inch square, place the spices in the center, draw the sides and corners of the square up so that nothing can leak out, and tie securely with a piece of string or heavy white thread.) Submerge the bouquet garni in water, add the salt, pepper, chili powder, and tomato sauce, and stir. Once the mixture reaches a boil, reduce the heat to attain a soft, rolling simmer, and cook uncovered for exactly two hours, adding water if necessary to keep the level just above the meat. After two hours, remove from the heat and let it sit uncovered without cooking for exactly two hours. Then again add water to cover the meat (which will have absorbed most of the earlier moisture), return to the heat and boil/simmer for exactly one hour.

Cooking The Dog
In order to be authentic, the dog must be grilled, not boiled, steamed or microwaved. This grilling does not have to add fat, as you can use fat-free cooking spray to keep the dogs from sticking.

The Condiments
For the sake of authenticity, serve only with chopped onions and generic yellow mustard.

The Buns
The buns can be of almost any variety, from bakery fresh to the generic supermarket kind. Though it is not crucial, to be absolutely authentic, they should be steamed soft.

Building The Perfect Chili Dog
Grab a bun, slap in a dog, slather on mustard, then throw on a wooden spoonful of onions. Dip a wooden spoon into the chili, scoop some up against the side of the pan to drain the moisture and slosh it on. Scrape with the spoon until the coverage is fairly even.

The Low-Fat Version
Depending on what type of ground beef you use, the amount of chili necessary to amply cover one dog can range in fat content from one to twenty fat grams (some supermarkets now carry ground beef that has only one gram of fat per ounce, and once cooked, a reasonable serving can contain as little as one to two ounces of beef.

As for the hot dogs, I have used everything from turkey dogs to more expensive fat-free varieties with similarly tasty results. Turkey dogs contain about six grams of fat each, and inexpensive hot-dog buns usually contain one- to-two grams of fat. Assuming you use fat-free dogs and two-gram buns, each completed dog could contain as little as four or five grams of fat – five or six if you double the amount of chili sauce.

Image


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Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:57 pm
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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Thankyou for that lebeaux. I haven't seen whole allspice although ground powdered is easily available. When you say 'grill' do you mean cook in a griddle pan with the heat underneath? When we say grill we mean the heat comes from above, but I think that is called broiling in the US.

Anyway, I like the sound of the meat mixture, although not the doughey buns. I will give it a try.

I did the pigeon casserole and it was very good, though I made it up as I went along since I couldn't find a recipe I fancied. I sauteed a large onion, couple of carrots and two sweet potatoes, then sealed off the floured pigeon in the hot oil. Added water to cover and chucked in three garlic cloves, a sprig of thyme and a sprig of rosemary tied together. A chicken stock cube and a slosh of port.

I cooked it for an hour on a low heat and then tested for seasoning. Then I just left it in the oven till we were ready. Served with creamed potatoes and steamed cauliflower. We had plain yoghurt and honey for desert.

It is a very autumnal dish.


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Post Re: What's Cooking?
Penelope wrote:

We have been having inseasonably hot sunny weather for this time of year and so we had a barbecue with the kids on Saturday instead of the Sushi which we'd bought and planned for. Since Sushi doesn't keep for long, we ate it on Sunday evening, which meant I didn't cook a roast dinner, most unusual for a Sunday. So tonight I'm doing a pigeon casserole.

I should have posted on here about last Sunday's dinner because we had grouse. I braised a brace of grouse and they were really quite something. We can't usually get grouse in the game season (which has just started here), they are always too expensive for our game supplier to stock with any confidence. Anyway, last weekend he had them at £5 each and they are so delicious. A sweetish dark meat, rather like wild duck (mallard) but juicier, I thought. I made really sumptuous soup with the carcasses too.


I love this post! To my American sensibilities it seems so British and pastoral. We do not ever cook a brace of anything, let alone grouse. We Americans eat very little in the way of game, with the exception of venison. The dish sounds very tasty. I love duck. Oh, and our weather has been unusually wet - rain almost everyday in September and a moist October 1!



Mon Oct 03, 2011 5:11 pm
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