Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Mar 06, 2021 6:57 am





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
Ch. 5 - Choosing mates 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Owner
Diamond Contributor 3

Joined: May 2002
Posts: 16349
Location: Florida
Thanks: 3605
Thanked: 1383 times in 1083 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Ch. 5 - Choosing mates
Ch. 5 - Choosing mates



Sun Mar 18, 2012 8:53 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I dumpster dive for books!

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor 2

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 1788
Thanks: 154
Thanked: 744 times in 556 posts
Gender: Male

Post Re: Ch. 5 - Choosing mates
Ch. 5 talks about the standard evolutionary story of what characteristics men and women look for in their mates. Most people are familiar with the basic idea -- men want young, attractive women; women want a provider, etc.

It is interesting to think about how much we defy those Darwinian impulses. Dawkins talked about our ability to rebel against the selfish gene -- contraception being an example.



Sun Apr 08, 2012 7:27 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Doctorate


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 508
Thanks: 48
Thanked: 123 times in 102 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Ch. 5 - Choosing mates
CHOOSING MATES
This chapter seems to take a totally Westernised view of partner choice influencing our gene selection, and as we are talking about evolutionary biology, this makes little sense. ‘…the parents must agree to choose each other as mates’. And ‘It’s probably fair to say that these are the two biggest decisions that we make in our lives’, Well, no, actually. In many societies even today, young people have little or no say in their choice of partner; The choice is made by the elders of the family. This was true even in Europe, where especially children of nobility would be betrothed at a very early age for political reasons.
One of the teachers at our nursery wanted to marry the father of her child, but the family disapproved and gave her the choice of three alternatives. She accepted one of these, and is now very happily married. The funny thing is, that on the day of her marriage, she was at school, as neither partner were required to be at the wedding ceremony, only the elders of both families. (But they did have a big party in the evening).
I’m also confused by his statement that ‘Monogomy is rare (except in the dog family, where it is the rule).’ Well has he ever seen the behaviour of dogs after a bitch on heat?
Again, when he talks about ‘monogamy pair-bonding characterize most human mating arrangements, even in the 80 per cent of cultures which permit or approve of monogamy) limit males to one female at a time’. Yes, they can only have one female at a time, but they can have different females on different days.
Also, I disagree with his view that ‘in successive relationships, men (but not necessarily women) should target women who are progressively younger than themselves.
Choosing a partner has as much to do with wealth as reproduction. The more wives a man has, the greater his earning power, because the wives work in the gardens, markets, etc., and so his income is increased. And when two cultures meet, as here in Gambia where Europeans mingle with the local population, it is very common for 40 – 80 year old rich European men AND women (relatively speaking) to find themselves a very young Gambian partner.
http://www.topix.com/forum/world/the-ga ... 3Q11LA6O8P

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... urism.html


Also, where is his evidence that female physical attractiveness is a reliable index of fertility in women? I thought physical attractiveness was not only of body ratio but of facial attractiveness as well?


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


The following user would like to thank heledd for this post:
Dexter
Wed Apr 18, 2012 11:15 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I dumpster dive for books!

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor 2

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 1788
Thanks: 154
Thanked: 744 times in 556 posts
Gender: Male

Post Re: Ch. 5 - Choosing mates
heledd wrote:
CHOOSING MATES
This chapter seems to take a totally Westernised view of partner choice influencing our gene selection, and as we are talking about evolutionary biology, this makes little sense. ‘…the parents must agree to choose each other as mates’. And ‘It’s probably fair to say that these are the two biggest decisions that we make in our lives’, Well, no, actually. In many societies even today, young people have little or no say in their choice of partner; The choice is made by the elders of the family.


Well, I think the authors might say that we have these evolutionary influences, which can manifest themselves differently depending on the culture. In this case, maybe it's elders rather than the couple making the decisions, and being influenced by their evolved psychology.

But you make some good points.



Thu Apr 19, 2012 2:49 pm
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Community Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Book Discussion Leaders

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
Banned Books
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
Promote your FICTION book
Promote your NON-FICTION book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2021. All rights reserved.

Display Pagerank