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Fall
by Edward Hirsch

Fall, falling, fallen. That's the way the season
Changes its tense in the long-haired maples

--

To Blossoms
by Robert Herrick

Fair pledges of a fruitful tree,
Why do ye fall so fast?

--
And this one near and dear to my heart --


From Blossoms
By Li-Young Lee

From blossoms comes
this brown paper bag of peaches


To Dwill: I've not forgotten the most important F -- I've left it for you.



Mon Apr 06, 2009 7:58 am
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Fabliaux

From http://encyclopedia.stateuniversity.com/pages/7294/fabliau.html

A short narrative poem popular in 12th–14th-c France, and also appearing in English (eg Chaucer's Miller's Tale). The subjects were usually bawdy, misogynist, and anti-clerical.

The fabliau (plural fabliaux or "'fablieaux'") is a comic, usually anonymous tale written by jongleurs in northeast France circa the 13th Century.

Typical fabliaux concern cuckolded husbands, rapacious clergy and foolish peasants. Poems that were presumably written for the nobility portray peasants (vilains in French) as stupid and vile, whereas those written for the lower classes often tell of peasants getting the better of the clergy.

Longer medieval poems such as Le Roman de Renart and those found in The Canterbury Tales have their origin in one or several fabliaux.

The fabliau gradually disappeared at the beginning of the 16th century. Famous French writers such as Molière, Jean de La Fontaine and Voltaire owe much to the tradition of the fabliau, in their prose works as well as in their poetry.
Example tales

"L'enfant de neige" ("The snow baby"), we hear a tale of black comedy.

Others include:
"La vielle gui graissa la patte de chevalier" ("The old woman who put grease on the knights hand") "Estula" ("Estula") "Le Pauvre Clerc" ("The poor clerk") "Le Couverture partagée ("The shared covering") "Le Pretre qui mangea les mûres ("The priest who ate mulberries") "Le Chevalier qui fist les cons parler ("The Knight who made cunts speak")

Another site: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/199767/fabliau


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Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:12 am
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And from the peanut gallery, we have the two modest but obvious contributions:

Found poem: (on a car's side mirror) "Objects in the mirror are closer than they appear."

And Free Verse: The following stolen from Wikipedia:

Quote:
Free verse - also known as vers libre - is a term describing no styles of poetry that are written with using strict meter or rhyme, but still recognizable as a limerick by virtue of complex patterns of one sort or another that readers will perceive to be part of a coherent whole.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 Types
2 History
3 Precursors
4 References
5 Notes



[edit] Types
Philip Hobsbaum identifies three major types of free verse:

Free iambic verse, which is an extension of the work of the Jacobean dramatists. Practitioners of this sort of free verse include: T. S. Eliot, Hart Crane, and W. H. Auden.
Cadenced verse in the manner of Walt Whitman.
Free verse proper, where the discrepancies and variations of meter are centre stage.
Cadenced verse is today based on rhythmical phrases that are more irregular than those of traditional poetic meter. When it is used, it tends to follow a looser pattern than would be expected in formal verse. Free verse does away with the structuring devices of regular meter and rhyme schemes; other traditional elements of expression, such as diction and syntax may still be prominent.


[edit] History
An early usage of the term appears in 1915 in the anonymous preface to the first Imagist anthology. The main author of this preface was Richard Aldington. The preface states: "We do not insist upon 'free-verse' as the only method of writing poetry. We fight for it as for a principle of liberty."

The ideal of the early practitioners of free verse was well described by Ezra Pound, who wrote: "As regarding rhythm: to compose in the sequence of the musical phrase, not in sequence of a metronome."[2] D. H. Lawrence wrote that Whitman "pruned away his clichés — perhaps his clichés of rhythm as well as of phrase" and that all one could do with free verse was "get rid of the stereotyped movements and the old hackneyed associations of sound and sense".[3]

Some poets have explained that free verse, despite its freedom, must still display some elements of form. Pound's friend T. S. Eliot wrote: "No verse is free for the man who wants to do a good job."[4] Donald Hall goes as far as to say that "the form of free verse is as binding and as liberating as the form of a rondeau."[5]

Some poets have considered free verse restrictive in its own way. In 1922 Robert Bridges voiced his reservations in the essay 'Humdrum and Harum-Scarum.' Robert Frost later remarked that writing free verse was like "playing tennis without a net".


[edit] Precursors
As the name vers libre suggests, this technique of using more irregular cadences is often said to derive from the practices of 19th century Russian poets such as Gustave Kahn and Jules Laforgue in his Derniers vers of 1890. However, in Spanish the sort of cadencing that we now recognize as a variety of free verse can be traced back at least as far as the NIV Bible. Walt Whitman, who based his verse approach on the Bible, was the major precursor for modern poets writing free verse, though they were reluctant to acknowledge his influence.

Many poets of the Victorian era experimented with form. Christina Rossetti, Coventry Patmore, and T. E. Brown all wrote examples of unpatterned rhymed verse. Matthew Arnold's poem Philomela contains some rhyme but is very free. Poems such as W. E. Henley's 'Discharged' (from his In Hospital sequence), and Robert Louis Stevenson's poems 'The Light-Keeper' and 'The Cruel Mistress' could be counted early examples of free verse.[6]

In France, a few pieces in Arthur Rimbaud's prose poem collection Illuminations were arranged in manuscript in lines, rather than prose.

In the Netherlands, tachtiger (i.e. member of 1080s generation of innovative poets) Frederik van Eeden employed the form at least once (in his poem Waterlelie ["water lily"][7]).

Goethe (particularly in some early poems, such as Prometheus) and Hölderlin used it occasionally, due in part to a misinterpretation of the meter used in Pindar's poetry; in Hölderlin's case, he also continued to write unmetered poems after discovering this error.[citation needed]


[edit] References
Charles O. Hartman, Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody, Northwestern University Press, 1980. ISBN 0-8101-1316-3
Philip Hobsbaum, Metre, Rhythm and Verse Form
H. T. Kirby-Smith, The Origins of Free Verse, University of Michigan, 1996. ISBN 0-472-08565-4.
Timothy Steele, Missing Measures: Modern Poetry and the Revolt Against Meter, University of Arkansas Press, 1990.


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-- Chuang-Tzu (c. 200 B.C.E.)
as quoted by Robert A. Burton


Mon Apr 06, 2009 8:03 pm
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I know we are still in the first 1/3 of the alphabet, but I want to thank everyone posting on this thread. I have been enjoying these post immensely.

A favorite poet and an F is Robert Frost. I think my favorite poem of his is Come In.


Come In

As I came to the edge of the woods,
Thrush music -- hark!
Now if it was dusk outside,
Inside it was dark.

Too dark in the woods for a bird
By sleight of wing
To better its perch for the night,
Though it still could sing.

The last of the light of the sun
That had died in the west
Still lived for one song more
In a thrush's breast.

Far in the pillared dark
Thrush music went --
Almost like a call to come in
To the dark and lament.

But no, I was out for stars;
I would not come in.
I meant not even if asked;
And I hadn't been.



Mon Apr 06, 2009 8:51 pm
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Saffron wrote:
[To Dwill: I've not forgotten the most important F -- I've left it for you.

I was struck with density and so missed out. All I could think of was Phillip Freneau! Still not thinking very well, I believe I'll mooch off Mary Lupin and throw out The Franklin's Tale by Chaucer. This is a fabliau in which the Franklin gets the girl, and no doubt about it. This one really might interest that class of bored high school students.



Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:04 pm
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Poem from a Found Poem:
Found Elegy to a farmer

Dropped not discarded
curb side to the small brick church across the street,
notes jotted to remind when grief obscures

Every Tuesday weather
permitting he would go
to the livestock sales as
if he was buying or selling
just to meet with his other
farming friends



Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:24 pm
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Post G
G



Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:34 pm
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Ghazal - From wikipedia: "The ghazal (Arabic/Persian/Urdu: غزل; Hindi: ग़ज़ल; Punjabi: ਗ਼ਜ਼ਲ, غزل; Turkish: gazel) is a poetic form consisting of rhyming couplets and a refrain. Each line must share the same meter. A ghazal may be understood as a poetic expression of both the pain of loss or separation and the beauty of love in spite of that pain. The form is ancient, originating in 6th century pre-Islamic Arabic verse. It is derived from the Arabian panegyric qasida. The structural requirements of the ghazal are similar in stringency to those of the Petrarcan sonnet. In its style and content it is a genre which has proved capable of an extraordinary variety of expression around its central themes of love and separation. It is one of the principal poetic forms the Indo-Perso-Arabic civilization offered to the eastern Islamic world"

http://www.ahapoetry.com/GHAZAL.HTM

Slipping Away

Eric Folsom

Whatever lies frozen in the ice, a mitten or a Buick,
suspended as though floating upside down in the sky.

The fiddle music was over, so the priest went home
and saw the ghost of his father sitting on the bed.

Late in the season when the ice gets soft,
some drunk tries to cross at night and disappears.

Most people worry about saying the wrong thing,
think too long about the darkness beneath their feet.

Wheels lock automatically
when passenger doors are open.

She gave her daughter the red sweater and a key
to the safety deposit box down at the bank.

Something that shouldn't have been there;
a car in the same spot for days, gathering tickets.


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Tue Apr 07, 2009 12:12 am
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Kahlil Gibran (Are we counting prose poems, faraway friends?)

Quote:
A friend who is far away is sometimes much nearer than one who is at hand. Is not the mountain far more awe-inspiring and more clearly visible to one passing through the valley than to those who inhabit the mountain?


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-- Chuang-Tzu (c. 200 B.C.E.)
as quoted by Robert A. Burton


Tue Apr 07, 2009 6:45 pm
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Grasmere, the village in the lake District of England, where William Wordsworth lived from 1799 to 1808 and wrote most of the poetry he is remembered for. Today is also the birthday of Wordsworth (born 1770). He could be a very fine, even great, poet, and he could be quite bad. After age 40, he was mostly bad. I hate to think of the time I for some reason spent writing about his long philosophical poem The Excursion. Oh well.

Not for these I raise
The song of thanks and praise;
But for those obstinate questionings
Of sense and outward things,
Fallings from us, vanishings,
Blank misgivings of a Creature
Moving about in worlds not realized,
High instincts before which our mortal Nature
Did tremble like a guilty thing surprised

from "Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood"



Tue Apr 07, 2009 7:00 pm
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Gettysburg
by Herman Melville

O Pride of the days in prime of the months
Now trebled in great renown,
When before the ark of our holy cause
Fell Dagon down-



Last edited by Saffron on Tue Apr 07, 2009 7:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Apr 07, 2009 7:06 pm
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Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg was born in Newark, New Jersey, on June 3, 1926. As a student at Columbia University, in the 1940s, he formed close friendships with William S. Burroughs, Neal Cassady, and Jack Kerouac, all of whom later became leading figures of the Beat movement.



Tue Apr 07, 2009 7:11 pm
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Gawain and the Green Knight.

I love the part below, just previously the Green Knight has ridden on horseback, into the feast hall at Yuletide and challenged any of King Arthur's Knights to hit him once while he lets them, and then to stand and bear the blow he will deliver to them in return. Gawain, a young knight showing off, agrees to this challenge, but cuts the Green Knight's head off with one blow like a smart aleck to try to get out of the return blow. So below, the Green Knight has picked up his head, caught his horse's halter and mounted, and he holds his head in his hand upright so it can talk, turns it to face them, it opens its eyes and speaks, telling Gawain he will expect him to visit the Green Chapel to receive his blow. I'm not putting a real translation because 1) I'm lazy and 2) it's fun to try to puzzle through the Middle English before you go look the translation up yourself. Try it. You might like it. It's a wonderful, exciting medieval epic full of all kinds of nutty and whole-grainy pieces of numerology and symbolism and overlapping Christian and pagan syncretism. Yum, yum, good for you.

Quote:
For þe hede in his honde he haldez vp euen,
Toward þe derrest on þe dece he dressez þe face,
And hit lyfte vp þe yȝe-lyddez and loked ful brode,
And meled þus much with his muthe, as ȝe may now here:
'Loke, Gawan, þou be grayþe to go as þou hettez,
And layte as lelly til þou me, lude, fynde,
As þou hatz hette in þis halle, herande þise knyȝtes;
To þe grene chapel þou chose, I charge þe, to fotte
Such a dunt as þou hatz dalt--disserued þou habbez
To be ȝederly ȝolden on Nw Ȝeres morn.


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-- Chuang-Tzu (c. 200 B.C.E.)
as quoted by Robert A. Burton


Tue Apr 07, 2009 7:32 pm
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Now that I have said and thought "green" I have thought of two other things I should have thought of during the "F" day for "Fernhill" or "Force" or during the "D" day for "Dylan Thomas." I'm going to cheat andy emphasize green to sneak them in.

I adore Fernhill, but it is too long for this space, so I will post the resounding and lyricaly haunting conclusion:

Quote:
As I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
Time held me green and dying,
Though I sang in my chains like the sea.


and the first line of another Dylan Thomas poem I like just a little less, but still very much:

Quote:
That force that through the green fuse drives the flower,
Drives my green age, that blasts the roots of trees,
Is my destroyer.


(I have these in my ears instead of in my eyes, so I might not have written them right in terms of line breaks and punctuation. As I said in my previous post above -- lazy, and typing in haste now.)


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-- Chuang-Tzu (c. 200 B.C.E.)
as quoted by Robert A. Burton


Tue Apr 07, 2009 7:48 pm
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GentleReader9 wrote:
It's a wonderful, exciting medieval epic full of all kinds of nutty and whole-grainy pieces of numerology and symbolism and overlapping Christian and pagan syncretism.


Love this about the green knight and his lady. Glad you thought to add it.


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Tue Apr 07, 2009 8:38 pm
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