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What is your impression of the religion Islam?

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MadArchitect

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Re: The Islamaniacs are lunatics

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riverc0il: In the youth of our country's history, it was not uncommon for states to have religious restrictions on public office.More than that, as I've recently been reminded, the Constitutional clause prohibiting a national religion did not preclude the initiative of individual states to name an official state religion. This is, in some part, the result of the Reformation's bid to make religious tolerance conform to the territorial imperative of the recently shelved feudalistic social model.I have yet to see any Islamists in the United States suggesting any such thing nor else where that are not states primarily of Islamists.There have been, in some European nations, pushes to adopt Shariah laws as political law in certain regions. But I would say that's almost a political agenda rather than a strictly religious agenda. As for the Middle East proper, the issue is more confused. Dissident Heart: The influence/involvement has been to secure control over the greatest geological prize in modern history: oil.That's certainly been the focus in recent years, but I think it's important as well to remember the strategic geopolitical role that the Middle East has played in the period since, say, Napolean invaded Egypt. The Middle East is the convergence point for three of the six inhabited continents, and is politically important for that as much as for its natural resourcesThe more we scratch the surface on all of this, the more curious I get. I'm hoping that other people will remember this subject when we start voting on next quarter's non-fiction selection, so we can read and discuss this as a group.
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Dissident Heart

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Terror is as Terror does

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Loricat,I was referring to a book titled, The Checkbook and the Cruise Missile: Conversations with Arundhati Roy. The book is a selection of interviews by David Barsamian with Ms. Roy. She is a writer from India who has carefully, perhaps brilliantly, exposed the contemporary terror unleashed upon the former colonies of European and American empires. As the book's title states, State driven terror can take the form of military might as well as economic policies. Thus, when speaking of terrorists we need some basic levels of clarification. Edited by: Dissident Heart at: 8/11/06 1:12 pm
minority mandate

Re: Islam

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Terrorism (which is mostly just another name for 'enemy') aside:If you look at all religions on a spectrum of worldly (Confucianism) to other-worldly (monasticism), Islam appears to weigh in on the otherworldly camp. To the extent that people live for heaven, they disrespect life as we know it. You can see this in the Rapture movement as folks who are going to heaven have little necessity to deal with life in the here and now. This disrespect for life is passive for monks, but quite active for evangelicals and Muslims.
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Dissident Heart

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Eschaton

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minoritymandate: Islam appears to weigh in on the otherworldly camp.To the extent that people live for heaven, they disrespect life as we know it. I suppose it depends upon which Muslim you speak to, and in what context you explore the issue. Islam, as a whole, certainly has a strong eschatological component: history and existence are headed in a particular direction with a certain ending. This direction and ending are in Allah's hands, and understood in largely moral terms of justice and retribution; with an inscrutable element of grace that transcends all human understanding. I think Islam can keep a Muslim profoundly tied to this world and the next: one's place in heaven is largely determined by how one behaves here and now. The Muslim cannot escape the responsibilities and challenges of this world for the pleasures and raptures of the next. It is by engaging the injustices and obligations of this world that the Muslim prepares for life in the world to come. In this sense, faith in Heaven does not devalue life on Earth: but, instead, gives it a meaning and purpose that shapes behaviors and attitudes of the greatest respect and reverence.
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Re: Eschaton

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The tension between wordly and otherwordly philosophies is a theme in A.O. Lovejoy's "The Great Chain of Being". Is that where you encountered the distinction, mandate, or is this a line you've drawn yourself?
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Re: Eschaton

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Several of my newest clients are Muslim and I'm really enjoying getting to know them.
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Dissident Heart

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Eco-Islam

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I'm especially interested in how the world religions interact and intersect with the environmental movement. Islam can and does play an essential role in this interplay of ideas and activism. I think this speaks directly to those critiques that define Islam as inherently or inescapably "otherworldly". Granted, there is a good deal within Islam (and most other religions) that can support an escapist delusion that devalues this world for the promises of the next. But, Islam and the other religions can also support a profoundly this-worldly commitment to the earth and its fragile ecosystems. Below are a few examples of how Islam can, and must, become an integral ally in the environmentalist movements toward sustainable living and ecological sanity.Quote:The earth is mentioned some 453 times in the Qur'an, whereas sky and the heavens are mentioned only about 320 times. Islam does understand the earth to be subservient to humankind but it should not be administered and exploited irresponsibly. There is a strong sense of the goodness and purity of the earth. Clean dust may be used for ablutions before prayer if clean water is not available. The Prophet Muhammad said that: "The earth has been created for me as a mosque and as a means of purification." So there is a sacrality to the earth which is a fit place for human's service of God, whether in formal ceremonies or in daily life. A former United States Secretary of the Interior said stewardship of the environment was not really such an urgent matter in light of the prophesied destruction of the natural order on doomsday. In contrast, the Prophet Muhammad said, "When doomsday comes, if someone has a palm shoot in his hand he should plant it." Islam and Ecology: A Bestowed Trust/ Inviting Balanced Stewardship Frederick M. Denny University of ColoradoQuote:The attempt by Muslims (and those who study them) to discover what the tradition has to say about the global environmental crisis today has only recently begun, and this volume is fortunate to include many of the voices which have been prominent in this endeavor. We will surely hear many more such voices in the years to come. Center for the Study of World Religions: Harvard Divinity School Religions of the World and Ecology Series Islam and Ecology Quote:ABOUT THE ISLAMIC FOUNDATION FOR ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCESOur home planet Earth is undergoing rapid and sustained destruction of its eco-systems.This is giving rise to unacceptable levels of pollution, increasing damage to human habitations and ultimately threatening world-wide population disruption. Muslims comprise at least one fifth of the human community and they can contribute much to the thinking that is vital to re-evaluate the future direction of the human community and save its home for itself and other life forms.From tentative beginnings in the mid 1980's IFEES has established itself as perhaps the only internationally recognised body articulating the Islamic position on these matters and at the same time attempting to give practical manifestation to this. This web site may be seen as evidence of its purpose and intentions.IFEES is a multi-dimensional organisation and its objectives include- Research and the dissemination of information- Producing teaching materials, books and journals- Training on practical and theoretical subjects- The setting up of an experimental centre focusing on land use and organic farming and also the development of alternative technologyIFEES networks world-wide with NGOs, international organisations, academic bodies and grass roots organisations and invites collaboration from organisations and individuals from all persuasions who are also dedicated to the maintenance of the Earth as a healthy habitat for future generations of humankind as well as other living beings. Edited by: Dissident Heart at: 8/21/06 1:33 pm
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Loricat
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Assumptions

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Mandate: You can see this in the Rapture movement as folks who are going to heaven have little necessity to deal with life in the here and now. This disrespect for life is passive for monks, but quite active for evangelicals and Muslims.If I had never lived in a Judeo-Christian society, and I was exposed to someone like GWB for example, I would be able to make sweeping statements about Christians that you make here about all Muslims. People are people...the one thing I can say from my 12 years of teaching English to people from all corners of the world, and living in Asia & South America, is that the only fundamental differences between people are the languages they speak. I had a Korean Buddhist nun friend for a bit while I lived in Korea, and she had a big movie collection. Her friend at a mountain monastery had a passion for watching the "Go" channel on TV (the game with little flat black and white beads on a wooden board). My Muslim friend in Vancouver has a Darth Vader fixation and dyes her hair purple. My Muslim friend in Lebanon enjoys digital photography and long afternoons of drinking coffee with friends. Very little in this world conforms to stereotype. "All beings are the owners of their deeds, the heirs to their deeds." Loricat's Book NookCelebrating the AbsurdEdited by: Loricat at: 8/21/06 1:38 pm
funda62

Re: What is your impression of the religion Islam?

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Quote:Unfavourable to the extent that my impression of christianity or any other -ism is also unfavourable. My DH's entire family is muslim. I lived in Turkey for four years. There are good muslims and bad ones. There are liberal muslims and conservative muslims. Never once was I asked to convert or given a relgious lecture. In that respect at least I think muslims are way better than xians.On a side note I also never feared for my safety. Women are well protected in public in muslim societies. After 9/11 so many people told me how sorry they were and was there anything they could do. They really ached for America and her people. However in the build up to Iraq I watched first hand as all of that love was turned to hatred for Bush et al (not the country as a whole).Funda
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