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What causes gravity?

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Chris OConnor

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What causes gravity?

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What causes gravity?Tonight I was talking with my father about this question. My answer was that we really don't know what causes this phenomenon. We can describe or quantify the effects of gravity, but we don't have a clue as to how to define or explain gravity.Gravity is simply something that happens when you have mass. All objects with mass attract other objects with mass.But doesn't light get bent by gravity? Does light have mass? Anyone care to explain this further and without confusing everyone with formulas and lingo?Chris "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." - Nelson Mandella
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Re: What causes gravity?

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I do not know much about it, but I have heard that light indeed has mass. That is all I can offer at this time because, not to be redundant and repeat the same thing over and over and over...but as I said, I dont know much about it.Mr. P. The one thing of which I am positive is that there is much of which to be negative - Mr. P.I came to get down, I came to get down. So get out ya seat and jump around - House of PainHEY! Is that a ball in your court? - Mr. PI came to kick ass and chew Bubble Gum...and I am all out of Bubble Gum - They Live, Roddy Piper
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Interbane

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Re: What causes gravity?

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Honestly, I have a theory that explains gravity and have been trying to contact anyone who can tell me if I'm full of @#$% or if there is a potential that I'm correct. I've emailed 13 different physics professors and have not heard a reply. I can explain the theory here, but it might take a while.Also, I have not studied physics past the high school level. I've read many books by Stephen Hawking, Carl Sagan, Brian Greene and others, but I do not consider them as informative as a college education. That said, I'm sure that my theory is incorrect... possibly for a pretty simple reason that I cannot see. BUT - how will I know if I never try.
booper54

Re: What causes gravity?

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FUCK I HATE MY COMPUTER! I typed out the whole message but it screwed up. Ugghhh....Interbane: If you want to, explain it! I'd like to hear it.mr. p: I'm pretty sure that light does NOT have mass. If it did, according to special relativity, it would have an infinite amount of it because of the equation E=mc^2....Chris: I think this question is one that stumps a lot of the physicists trying to get rid of the paradox between general relativity and quantum theory. I remember reading about string theory and it explained gravity as a particle called a "graviton." But like mr. p, I don't really know much about it either.
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Re: What causes gravity?

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InterbaneI'd love to hear your theory. As long as you're humble and don't claim to know you're correct most open-minded people are pretty receptive to new ideas....I think and hope.Chris "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." - Nelson Mandella
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Interbane

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Re: What causes gravity?

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I must ask a quick question first. Also, I don't have time to translate the whole theory from mind to language right now. That's an interesting way to put it, huh? My fingers thought of that one. Sorry, I went camping all weekend and feel like I'm on drugs, my mind is working wierd.The question:It is said that the faster you travel through space, the slower your speed through time becomes relative to a stationary observer. My question is if your spacial speed needs to be linear. Can it be rotational speed, or reciprocating speed(back and forth)? If so, there are only two other obvious questions to be asked before my theory passes my pre-release scrutiny.
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Chris OConnor

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Re: What causes gravity?

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I would think that it refers to speed in relation to a light source, but what do I know. Seems like you are thinking about some sort of vibrational frequency.Chris "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." - Nelson Mandella
booper54

Re: What causes gravity?

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Quote:It is said that the faster you travel through space, the slower your speed through time becomes relative to a stationary observer. My question is if your spacial speed needs to be linear. Can it be rotational speed, or reciprocating speed(back and forth)? If so, there are only two other obvious questions to be asked before my theory passes my pre-release scrutiny.Aaahhh! I just finished a relativity book and I know it explained this specifically, but I don't remember how. However I do remember the author (Einstein) used an example that a rod placed on the edge of a rotating circular plane would be shorter the faster it went with respect to a different reference system. I'm fairly certain that this is the same effect it has when it's moving in a straight line, which means the answer to your question is yes, it can be rotating speed in the same way it is linear speed. Edited by: booper54 at: 10/18/04 1:25 am
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Re: What causes gravity?

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Ahh, good good. It's possible you're wrong, but let's pretend you're right. Next question.Some scenarios are presented in theoretical physics that say after X amount of time moving very near the speed of light, person Y will be younger than his brother, person Z. This is because the faster you travel through space, the slower you travel through time. Kinda like a hypothetical velocity scale. More space speed, less time speed. To keep that idea symmetrical, I've heard that we are traveling at the speed of light through time relative to someone who is right next to us, unmoving. So when you are sitting next to your wife, you are both moving at the speed of light 'through time,' since neither of you are traveling at all through space.My question is this - to keep symmetry, should it not also work that if time were to slow way down, your spacial speed would need to increase to keep the balance, just as it is vice versa? This question is probably the most important one, and I cannot see an answer to it anywhere. Let me explain to you my uneducated reasoning for thinking the answer is yes. Spacial speed consists of speed through 3 dimensions. If you are traveling straight through one of those dimensions and shift 90 degrees to travel straight down another, that takes energy. Believe it or not, that change of direction is also called acceleration, just as an increase in linear speed is acceleration. When you travel at a 45 degree angle to 2 of the dimensions, your true linear speed may be 50 miles an hour. If you measured your speed on the axis of one of those 2 dimensions that you are at an angle to, you might be traveling just 33 miles an hour down that dimension. Mathematically, your speed is somehow split between the two dimensions.To envision my scenario with light, all you have to do is throw in the 4th dimension, time. The faster you travel through the time dimension, the slower you travel through one of the space dimensions - until you are standing still relative to your observer. Conversely, the slower you travel through the time dimension, the faster you must travel through one of the space dimensions to compensate. "If a pocket of space that is stationary relative to you suddenly experiences a slowness of time, you would start moving in a linear direction - most likely toward the pocket." - me Edited by: Interbane at: 10/18/04 10:32 am
booper54

Re: What causes gravity?

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That's an interesting theory, but I think you are wrong. The reason time moves slower the faster you go (with respect to a reference system) is because of the Second Postulate of Special Relativity which states something like "Light in a vacuum moves at the same speed in all reference systems." So time moves slower only because it has to in order to keep all reference systems valid.
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