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Poems for All Hallow's Eve 
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Post Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Just read this in Ciardi's book and it gave me an idea to start this thread. Love how the POV shifts in this poem. At the end, we're with the Listeners as the Traveller leaves the house.

The Listeners

BY WALTER DE LA MARE

‘Is there anybody there?’ said the Traveller,
Knocking on the moonlit door;
And his horse in the silence champed the grasses
Of the forest’s ferny floor:
And a bird flew up out of the turret,
Above the Traveller’s head:
And he smote upon the door again a second time;
‘Is there anybody there?’ he said.
But no one descended to the Traveller;
No head from the leaf-fringed sill
Leaned over and looked into his grey eyes,
Where he stood perplexed and still.
But only a host of phantom listeners
That dwelt in the lone house then
Stood listening in the quiet of the moonlight
To that voice from the world of men:
Stood thronging the faint moonbeams on the dark stair,
That goes down to the empty hall,
Hearkening in an air stirred and shaken
By the lonely Traveller’s call.
And he felt in his heart their strangeness,
Their stillness answering his cry,
While his horse moved, cropping the dark turf,
’Neath the starred and leafy sky;
For he suddenly smote on the door, even
Louder, and lifted his head:—
‘Tell them I came, and no one answered,
That I kept my word,’ he said.
Never the least stir made the listeners,
Though every word he spake
Fell echoing through the shadowiness of the still house
From the one man left awake:
Ay, they heard his foot upon the stirrup,
And the sound of iron on stone,
And how the silence surged softly backward,
When the plunging hoofs were gone.


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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
This is recopied from a post by Oblivion on Feb. 1, 2011 on the Top 500 Poems: 100-1

Matt Buckley (11/22/2009 9:06:00 AM)

The traveller has come to fulfil a duty. He had left something and promised to come back to it. It seems that a great time has passed. The air is still and the hall is empty (a hall that was probably filled some time ago with activity) What ever he left behind, he could now not summon. The sleeping group, could not be stirred. He has had communication with the listeners in the past - when the promise was made. The listeners are now sleeping and won't wake.

The traveller is actually searching for a lost unbridled imagination, for creativity. It is now gone, and he heads back to the logic-driven reality. One of Walter's main obsessions was with the ingenuity and vision of the child, and how over time, this is lost. In the traveller's journey to revisit or recover this way of existince, he can't stir it. He leaves and re-assures his soul that he tried ('tell them I came, and no one answered') . We often say that the soul has windows: note how the traveller peers into the window and sees nothing; no one is there to greet. Why the 'throng' no-longer responds 'perplexes' him. The listeners (the unbridled imagination) are present, but lie sleeping; discarded and left behind. There is a deathly feel, but it not the death of physical beings, these beings are not 'from the world of men'.



Fri Oct 28, 2011 8:56 pm
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Interesting interpretation. I can see it as that, an attempt to reconnect with a younger version of one's self. We are so idealistic and enthusiastic when we're young. As we age, it's hard not to become cynical. Not that I'm aging or anything.


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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Lovely, thanks for sharing.



Fri Oct 28, 2011 10:54 pm
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Here is the Halloween-themed poem I posted on the John Ciardi thread.

The Bat by Theodore Roethke •

By day the bat is cousin to the mouse.
He likes the attic of an aging house.

His fingers make a hat about his head.
His pulse beat is so slow we think him dead.

He loops in crazy figures half the night
Among the trees that face the corner light.

But when he brushes up against a screen,
We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:

For something is amiss or out of place
When mice with wings can wear a human face.



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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Hallow-E'en, 1914

by Winifred M. Letts

"Why do you wait at your door, woman,
Alone in the night?"
"I am waiting for one who will come, stranger,
To show him a light.
He will see me afar on the road
And be glad at the sight."

"Have you no fear in your heart, woman,
To stand there alone?
There is comfort for you and kindly content
Beside the hearthstone."
But she answered, "No rest can I have
Till I welcome my own."

"Is it far he must travel to-night,
This man of your heart?"
"Strange lands that I know not and pitiless seas
Have kept us apart,
And he travels this night to his home
Without guide, without chart."

"And has he companions to cheer him?"
"Aye, many," she said.
"The candles are lighted, the hearthstones are swept,
The fires glow red.
We shall welcome them out of the night—
Our home-coming dead."


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Sat Oct 29, 2011 10:23 am
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
The Sleeper
by Edgar Allen Poe

At midnight, in the month of June,
I stand beneath the mystic moon.
An opiate vapor, dewy, dim,
Exhales from out her golden rim,
And, softly dripping, drop by drop,
Upon the quiet mountain top,
Steals drowsily and musically
Into the universal valley.
The rosemary nods upon the grave;
The lily lolls upon the wave;
Wrapping the fog about its breast,
The ruin molders into rest;
Looking like Lethe, see! the lake
A conscious slumber seems to take,
And would not, for the world, awake.
All Beauty sleeps!- and lo! where lies
Irene, with her Destinies!

O, lady bright! can it be right-
This window open to the night?
The wanton airs, from the tree-top,
Laughingly through the lattice drop-
The bodiless airs, a wizard rout,
Flit through thy chamber in and out,
And wave the curtain canopy
So fitfully- so fearfully-
Above the closed and fringed lid
'Neath which thy slumb'ring soul lies hid,
That, o'er the floor and down the wall,
Like ghosts the shadows rise and fall!
Oh, lady dear, hast thou no fear?
Why and what art thou dreaming here?
Sure thou art come O'er far-off seas,
A wonder to these garden trees!
Strange is thy pallor! strange thy dress,
Strange, above all, thy length of tress,
And this all solemn silentness!

The lady sleeps! Oh, may her sleep,
Which is enduring, so be deep!
Heaven have her in its sacred keep!
This chamber changed for one more holy,
This bed for one more melancholy,
I pray to God that she may lie
For ever with unopened eye,
While the pale sheeted ghosts go by!

My love, she sleeps! Oh, may her sleep
As it is lasting, so be deep!
Soft may the worms about her creep!
Far in the forest, dim and old,
For her may some tall vault unfold-
Some vault that oft has flung its black
And winged panels fluttering back,
Triumphant, o'er the crested palls,
Of her grand family funerals-
Some sepulchre, remote, alone,
Against whose portal she hath thrown,
In childhood, many an idle stone-
Some tomb from out whose sounding door
She ne'er shall force an echo more,
Thrilling to think, poor child of sin!
It was the dead who groaned within.



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Sat Oct 29, 2011 4:19 pm
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
This is an awesome thread!

We can safely keep it going through Christmas too, since that is a time traditionally reserved for ghostly things.


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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
I agree Geo, with a slight variation. The creepiest time of year is from Halloween to Winter Solstice, Dec 21. I'm convinced this is when the wickedest of spirits abound, the pagan spirits, and when all human fears are manifest and so its prime time for spooky poems .... I like Edgar Allen Poe because his poems are effortlessly scary ...



Last edited by giselle on Sat Oct 29, 2011 11:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.



Sat Oct 29, 2011 11:44 pm
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
giselle wrote:
I like Edgar Allen Poe because his poems are effortlessly scary ...


I totally agree, Giselle :) I absolutely adore Poe, but I guess you can tell than already by my signature...

Do you guys know this amazing poem titled "The Highwayman" by Alfred Noyes? Highly recommended.
The full text can be found here: http://www.potw.org/archive/potw85.html
And the gorgeous adaptation by Loreena McKennitt : http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=PL&hl=p ... 2CFM4ev-g8


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From the same source I have not taken my sorrow
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And all I loved - I loved alone"

E.A.Poe


Sun Oct 30, 2011 4:47 am
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Aqueda_Veronica wrote:
Do you guys know this amazing poem titled "The Highwayman" by Alfred Noyes? Highly recommended.


Thanks Aqueda-Veronica, here is the second last verse from The Highwayman, I think its the scariest verse of the poem. Also this poem is interesting in that there are the earlier events and the aftermath, the mythology, I think this makes it scarier ... this verse is the first of the myth. It has his famous line 'riding, riding' riding' ... on and on forever it says .... And I inserted a bit more Edgar Allen Poe in honour of Halloween, the last four verses of The Raven, where the raven is fully in charge, "still is sitting, still is sitting":

The Highwayman (excerpt):

And still of a winter's night, they say, when the wind is in the trees,
When the moon is a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
When the road is a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
A highwayman comes riding—
Riding—riding—
A highwayman comes riding, up to the old inn-door.

The Raven (excerpt):

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! -
Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted -
On this home by horror haunted - tell me truly, I implore -
Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore -
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore -
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!' I shrieked upstarting -
`Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken! - quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted - nevermore!



Mon Oct 31, 2011 4:42 pm
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Aqueda_Veronica wrote:
giselle wrote:
I like Edgar Allen Poe because his poems are effortlessly scary ...


I totally agree, Giselle :) I absolutely adore Poe, but I guess you can tell than already by my signature...

Do you guys know this amazing poem titled "The Highwayman" by Alfred Noyes? Highly recommended.
The full text can be found here: http://www.potw.org/archive/potw85.html
And the gorgeous adaptation by Loreena McKennitt : http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=PL&hl=p ... 2CFM4ev-g8


By the way, I really liked the Noyes poem. The youtube video won't play though. It says something about not being licensed in North America or something like that.


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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
On Wanting to Tell [ ] about a Girl Eating Fish Eyes
By Mary Szybist

—how her loose curls float
above each silver fish as she leans in
to pluck its eyes—


You died just hours ago.
Not suddenly, no. You'd been dying so long
nothing looked like itself: from your window,
fishermen swirled sequins;
fishnets entangled the moon.


Now the dark rain
looks like dark rain. Only the wine
shimmers with candlelight. I refill the glasses
and we raise a toast to you
as so and so's daughter—elfin, jittery as a sparrow—
slides into another lap
to eat another pair of slippery eyes
with her soft fingers, fingers rosier each time,
for being chewed a little.


If only I could go to you, revive you.
You must be a little alive still.
I'd like to put this girl in your lap.
She's almost feverishly warm and she weighs
hardly anything. I want to show you how
she relishes each eye, to show you
her greed for them.


She is placing one on her tongue,
bright as a polished coin—


What do they taste like? I ask.
Twisting in my lap, she leans back
sleepily. They taste like eyes, she says.



Tue Nov 01, 2011 1:30 pm
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
There's something gross about eating eyes ... and kind of disturbing .. eyes being window of the soul and all that ... even fish eyes.



Tue Nov 01, 2011 4:52 pm
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Post Re: Poems for All Hallow's Eve
Bob Dylan's poem here has an apocalyptic tone to it. Listening to the song is better of course.

The Man in the Long Black Coat

Crickets are chirpin', the water is high,
There's a soft cotton dress on the line hangin' dry,
Window wide open, African trees
Bent over backwards from a hurricane breeze.
Not a word of goodbye, note even a note,
She gone with the man
In the long black coat.

Somebody seen him hanging around
At the old dance hall on the outskirts of town,
He looked into her eyes when she stopped to ask
If he wanted to dance, he had a face like a mask.
Somebody said from the Bible he'd quote
There was dust on the man
In the long black coat.

Preacher was a talkin' there's a sermon he gave,
He said every man's conscience is vile and depraved,
You cannot depend on it to be your guide
When it's you who must keep it satisfied.
It ain't easy to swallow, it sticks in the throat,
She gave her heart to the man
In the long black coat.

There are no mistakes in life some people say
It is true sometimes you can see it that way.
But people don't live or die, people just float.
She went with the man
In the long black coat.

There's smoke on the water, it's been there since June,
Tree trunks uprooted, 'neath the high crescent moon
Feel the pulse and vibration and the rumbling force
Somebody is out there beating the dead horse.
She never said nothing there was nothing she wrote,
She gone with the man
In the long black coat.


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Wed Nov 02, 2011 11:41 am
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