Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Tue Apr 20, 2021 12:03 am





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Owner
Diamond Contributor 3

Joined: May 2002
Posts: 16381
Location: Florida
Thanks: 3618
Thanked: 1385 times in 1085 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6



Fri Jan 03, 2014 3:18 pm
Profile Email WWW
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Creative Writing Student


Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 34
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 8 times in 6 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Thank you Chris for choosing my novel. As I said before, I will be glad to answer anyone's questions during the discussion. I hope everyone enjoys the read. It was a fun book to write, and I loved meeting and getting to know the characters as I wrote it.

Chip LoCoco
New Orleans



Sat Jan 04, 2014 9:29 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Owner
Diamond Contributor 3

Joined: May 2002
Posts: 16381
Location: Florida
Thanks: 3618
Thanked: 1385 times in 1085 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Your novel was chosen by just about everyone so I'm really looking forward to the discussion. As the owner of the community I don't often participate in the actual book discussions. My time is unfortunately needed on administrative things. But I did download a copy of Tempesta's Dream and will attempt to contribute as much as my time will allow. It seems Robert Tulip's endorsement of your book is what did it for me and pushed me to pick up a copy.



Sat Jan 04, 2014 11:27 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Doctorate


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 508
Thanks: 48
Thanked: 123 times in 102 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
I finished it, and although the story line was promising, and I did enjoy the discussions of various operatic themes, and anecdotes of composers and singers, I found it rather predictable, and I thought the characters lacked depth


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


Sat Jan 04, 2014 12:40 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6094
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2518
Thanked: 2476 times in 1855 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
heledd wrote:
I finished it, and although the story line was promising, and I did enjoy the discussions of various operatic themes, and anecdotes of composers and singers, I found it rather predictable, and I thought the characters lacked depth


Hi Heledd. I felt this book was written to be turned into an opera about opera. Chip could comment on that.

One of the features of operatic style is the use of dramatic stereotypes, so the characters gain in power what they lack in subtlty or uncertainty. I felt there was a raw intensity in the simple depiction of the characters, especially in the love story with Isabella, and with the passion the teacher shows.

There are some simple big parables in this story, such as that you can achieve your ambition if you have drive and dedication and talent and luck, that true love is more important than social standing, that you should follow your dreams, that everyone needs help from others, and that Italian opera is a truly magnificent art form.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Sat Jan 04, 2014 4:50 pm
Profile Email WWW
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Creative Writing Student


Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 34
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 8 times in 6 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Robert:

I love your comment that the book was written to be turned into an opera about opera. To be honest, that was not on my radar, but I do think you are on to something.

There is no question, at its core, the novel is a tribute to the majesty and beauty of opera. So, in that regard, it does take on a few characteristics of opera, which you summed up very nicely relative to stereotypes.

You also, better than anyone who has reviewed the book, nailed the simple, yet profound meaning behind the story. In today's cynical world, those simple "truths" are laughed at and thought to be "pie in the sky." But I disagree. I am sure that is do to my strong Sicilian heritage. Those aspirations and dreams were the bedrock of every Italian or Sicilian who made the trek on a boat to come to America. And being from a large Sicilian family, and a proud Italian/American, I still believe people strive to believe those simple truths, even though our society does everything it can to tell you it is an unrealistic view of life.

I always thought the story would make a great movie, because of the music. But, like I said above, an opera about opera is an interesting concept.

Chip LoCoco



The following user would like to thank calaf68 for this post:
Robert Tulip
Sun Jan 05, 2014 10:06 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Doctorate


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 508
Thanks: 48
Thanked: 123 times in 102 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
But Robert how can I do that? Opera supplies the drama and depth through music. Books have only words to rely on. I cant read it as if it were an opera, cos its not


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:20 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6094
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2518
Thanked: 2476 times in 1855 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Heledd, if it were about another topic I might agree with you, but with opera the magic and drama rub off onto the story. A libretto is by necessity nowhere near as detailed as a book, and like a movie script a libretto has to serve as a light frame for the visual and sonic impact. What I think Chip has done here is create the imaginative vision and sound of an opera, with the sense of glamour and skill and risk backed up by some of the most sublime music in history, in Verdi and Puccini.

I also think the relationships between the characters here are what really brings the novel to life. They may seem a bit wooden as individuals, but their meeting and interaction creates some powerful emotional moments.

I have had an ambivalent attitude towards opera. It is a somewhat old fashioned art form, with singers having to project their voice in an unnatural way due to the absence of amplification. The introduction of electrical instruments over the last century has made opera into something of a museum piece. I have always loved classical music though, but for me it was instrumental music first, then solo voice, with opera something I never really got, partly because singing in foreign languages is hard to follow even with subtitles.

But something about this story just grabbed me. There is a sense that in Milan opera is a living tradition driven by powerful and passionate individuals. As Chip commented, the themes of this book can seem cliched from a cynical point of view, but that does not really detract from their power and importance.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Mon Jan 06, 2014 4:50 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental


Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 292
Thanks: 13
Thanked: 106 times in 85 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
“Tempesta’s Dream”, Chapters 1-6
I was familiar with the story and the music of “Madama Butterfly” and the fact that the story ends so tragically. The fact that the author uses this in the prologue seemed to me like a foreboding of what’s to come in the book. Since Giovanni lost his father at an early age, could not talk to his mother about his feelings, did not have a girlfriend, and felt that his life was being wasted makes him (in my eyes) a loner, a dreamer, an artist who loves his music. “A singer who sings this music with passion can really touch your heart…”
The description of his meeting with Isabella and the balcony scene, I feel, was written in a somewhat simplistic way and made me smile: “This was love! Amore. He couldn’t take his eyes off of hers. She couldn’t take her eyes off of his…” Not criticizing, just recognizing that perhaps I’m too old and cynical.
The descriptions of Milan and Italian life were interesting. I really identified with Giovanni when he’s told by Toscano that it’s too late for his career and to give up his dream of becoming an operatic singer. That’s pretty much what people told me about writing and publishing my book.
I found the history of Casa di Riposo interesting. I assume that’s a true fact, I did not know that Verdi had established such a place.
That's all, didn't want to be too long-winded...reading on…



The following user would like to thank Crystalline for this post:
Robert Tulip
Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:13 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6094
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2518
Thanked: 2476 times in 1855 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Crystalline, your mention of the tragic end of Madame Butterfly illustrates that this novel is not really as predictable as Heledd suggested. There is a sense in which creative talent is always on the edge, teetering between triumph and disaster, as Kipling put in in If.

I have not seen The Force of Destiny by Verdi, but now looking at the plot summary, I am sure that Chip has seen it, since the first act is much the same as this book. I was prompted to think of this opera title because of the sense of destiny that hovers in this story. I felt a tantalising sense of wonder through the book about whether it would end in triumph or disaster.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:38 pm
Profile Email WWW
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Creative Writing Student


Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 34
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 8 times in 6 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
My comments on the Prologo:

By far, this was the most revised chapter in the entire novel. It originally started as just a narration of Giovanni's life and in particular, his love of opera. His father, Franco, was mentioned, but just how he instilled in his young son a love of opera by reading opera librettos to him and how he provided him with a dream to one day become an opera singer.

For a very long time, the Prologo remained that way, even though I always disliked it. Then, one day, I had a breakthrough, and the idea of beginning the novel as if we are sitting in the room as his father reads to Giovanni from Madama Butterfly. I loved how now we got to see his father and he interact.

What has been interesting are the different reactions from readers who know opera, who immediately know the story the father is relating is Madama Butterfly and those who do not know the story, but only find out when it is said in the novel. For people who do not know the story, they really have no idea where the story is going in the beginning, which I like.

As for why I chose Madama Butterfly - and in particular this scene. For years this scene has blown me away when I have seen it live. When she says he has returned and he loves her, the audience always erupts in applause, even though you know she is doomed. I agree with Robert - LA FORZA DEL DESTINO - The Force of Destiny - (which is a complicated opera plot, but one of the best names in all of opera). I chose Butterfly as I thought for someone who knows nothing about opera, you can easily understand the plot and what the young woman's emotions are. It does provide a sense of forboding over the opera.

Click the link below to listen to the great Maria Callas sing this as the ship enters the Harbor and her hopes are raised that he has come back to her. AMAZZZZZING.
http://youtu.be/c8cqgAGDPkY

Next post will be on the meeting between Isabella and Giovanni and the Casa Verdi.

Chip LoCoco



Tue Jan 07, 2014 6:30 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental


Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 292
Thanks: 13
Thanked: 106 times in 85 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Ahhh - destiny...I believe that one mostly makes his/her own destiny...
I love that you have included a snippet of the music in your reply...beautiful.
I don't think that many readers will appreciate it, but I may be wrong. At any rate, it may be a short introduction to operatic music to those who have never heard it. However, if one does not hear the whole aria, it will be hard to appreciate it from just a snippet. On the other hand, it may motivate them to find it and listen to the whole thing.
Just my opinion, of course. :)



Tue Jan 07, 2014 7:18 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Creative Writing Student


Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 34
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 8 times in 6 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Chapters 1- 4

Angelo's Restaurant does not exist, although I am sure you can find many such places throughout Milan, as many a singer worked singing at Cafe's awaiting their break. The basis for the restaurant was actually Victor Cafe in South Philly, complete with singing waiters and pictures of every conceivable opera singer and composer on the walls. Appropriate for a place like South Philly, as right down the street is the birth home of Mario Lanza. My wife worked in Philly before we were married, so I visited Victor Cafe many times.

Giovanni Tempesta - No matter where the story goes, the story is about his dream. Names in novels always fascinated me and how author's came up with the name. Giovanni Tempesta comes from a nickname that Giuseppe di Stefano, a great tenor from the 50s gave to a friend of my father's to make him an honorary Italian. His name was John Gehl, and di Stefano named him Giovanni (John) Tempesta (Storm/Gale). Thus, Giovanni Tempesta is my tribute to the both of them.

Isabella Monterone - the last name is taken from Rigoletto. Monterone is the father in Rigoletto who curses the Duke for seducing his young daughter setting up the plot of the whole opera.

The love that quickly develops between Giovanni and Isabella is a simplistic love. But it is one that Giovanni has dreamed love would be like. After all, his entire concept of love is the passionate stories of opera and the old Erroll Flynn movies his father would watch on TV.

I do think the balcony scene is a little tongue and cheek, as Giovanni even has to laugh at the fact that he climbed a balcony, just like Romeo. as he surmises. But then, opera takes hold, and he sings that gorgeous aria that closes out the balcony scene in Gounod's Opera, Romeo et Juliette. I am not going to provide music clips for everything, but I do think it makes for a great discussion. Listen as Rolando Villazon sings this aria. This is what Giovanni has going on in his head. This is his version of a romantic life. This is his vision of love. A with a kiss toward the window, he wishes her a goodnight.

http://youtu.be/g5yyiSBfK0U

Stunning right. Jump ahead to the meeting with Alfredo del Monte, which we will see later- this is living your life with background music.



Tue Jan 07, 2014 8:13 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Creative Writing Student


Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 34
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 8 times in 6 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
Chapters 5 - 6

Signor Toscano - Crystalline sums it up best. All of us have been turned down by someone in our life, be it a publisher, agent, job, lover, etc. I was hoping to use this encounter for Giovanni as the one that finally made him realize his dream was finished. Furthermore, I hoped to provide a distinction between Toscano and Alfredo del Monte. When asked by Toscano why Giovanni wants to sing, he responds, "God gave me a gift, my father gave me the passion, and my love gives me the desire. I need to sing. Credo al destino." Toscano laughs at the comment and then tells him not to believe in destiny. Flash forward, when, in Chapter 7, Giovanni tells the same thing to Alfredo, Alfredo does not laugh, but instead remembers that was the same thing he had told his teacher, way back when. It's subtle, but I was just trying to show the reader two different reactions to the same statement.


As always, when one door closes, another opens. Such as right after Toscano's rejection, by luck (OR DESTINY) Giovanni comes across the Piazza and hears Alfredo del Monte singing at the Casa di Riposo.

The Casa di Riposo, or as it is called in Milan, the Casa Verdi, is indeed a real place. The history given is the true history of the place. The Maestro is buried there with his wife. The home, to this day, is endowed with the royalties from all of Verdi's operas.

That's all for now. I have summed up the Prologo and Chapters 1- 6. Feel free to take this discussion anywhere at this point.



Tue Jan 07, 2014 8:44 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6094
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2518
Thanked: 2476 times in 1855 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 1 through 6
calaf68 wrote:
Giovanni Tempesta - No matter where the story goes, the story is about his dream. Names in novels always fascinated me and how author's came up with the name. Giovanni Tempesta comes from a nickname that Giuseppe di Stefano, a great tenor from the 50s gave to a friend of my father's to make him an honorary Italian. His name was John Gehl, and di Stefano named him Giovanni (John) Tempesta (Storm/Gale). Thus, Giovanni Tempesta is my tribute to the both of them.


Thanks Chip for all these additional pieces of background. You might find it annoying, but when I read your explanation of where Giovanni's name came from, John Gale, I immediately thought of John Galt, the hero of Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand. We had a good discussion of that book here last year. The story of John Galt is all about how he achieves his vision. Rand encounters a similar sort of cynicism from people who think that no one can achieve anything through individual initiative.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Wed Jan 08, 2014 12:45 am
Profile Email WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Community Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Book Discussion Leaders

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
Banned Books
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
Promote your FICTION book
Promote your NON-FICTION book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2021. All rights reserved.

Display Pagerank