Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Tue Oct 27, 2020 4:51 pm





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5994
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2421
Thanked: 2356 times in 1782 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2701/270 ... m#2HCH0002

I'm not going to paste the entirety of chapter two here, short as it is, as you can easily read it for yourself by clicking on the hyperlink that I have helpfully provided.

In this chapter, the slow pregnant journey from city to sea arrives at New Bedford in Connecticut, all worldly possessions conveniently stuffed in an old carpet bag. Not one concerned to yield to the impatient reader, Melville makes sure to set the scene well and proper, providing an imaginative thought portrait of this rather hellish place of puritan blubber cutters and adventurers in the wild east.

The legend of the first whalers whose harpoons were cobblestones helps us to start imagining how these killing fields steadily refined their efficiency and effectiveness. Just as the whales themselves were firstly bears who wandered to sea some fifty million years ago*, so the Red Men of Nantucket provided the evolutionary creation story for the scientific carnage of the nineteenth century. Happily HM was unacquainted with the apogee of progress in the explosive harpoons and factory ships of the century between his and ours when old blue almost saw his final end.

H.M. wrote:
It was a very dubious-looking, nay, a very dark and dismal night, bitingly cold and cheerless. I knew no one in the place. With anxious grapnels I had sounded my pocket,


Like Saint Paul on the storm-tossed Mediterranean mentioned in Acts 27:14, Melville tells us the Spouter Inn stands a palsied lean-to, its proprietor Peter Coffin providing the perfect resort for Ishmael. Poor Lazarus Osiris has nothing to eat but the aurora borealis and beggars can't be choosers. Leave the rich to drink the tepid tears of orphans! Ishmael is done with blubbering now, we are going a-whaling.



* or perhaps hippos - see How the whale learned to swim - A real Just So Story

Image


_________________
http://rtulip.net


The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
Saffron, Suzanne
Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:12 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Book General

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 2517
Location: New Jersey
Thanks: 557
Thanked: 448 times in 357 posts
Gender: Female

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Thank you Robert for including the"real just so srory". Whales were once wolf like. That would make sense. They are social creatures and make lovely haunting sounds. You mentioned you were reading a book on whale songs. Maybe there will be an appropriate chapter where you can introduce us to a passage or two.



Thu Mar 01, 2012 1:15 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6729
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2062
Thanked: 2310 times in 1744 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Robert Tulip wrote:
In this chapter, the slow pregnant journey from city to sea arrives at New Bedford in Connecticut, all worldly possessions conveniently stuffed in an old carpet bag.

Not to be a scold, Robert, since you know more about America than I know about Australia, but New Bedford isn't in my native state of Connecticut, but rather Massachusetts.



Thu Mar 01, 2012 1:48 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5994
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2421
Thanked: 2356 times in 1782 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
DWill wrote:
New Bedford isn't in my native state of Connecticut


ouchiwawa. Thank you. Well at least Connecticut would be a connecting path, he pleads aimlessly? If I can share some personal history, in 1977 my father taught English at Yale University for a year, and we lived as a family in Hamden for 8 months. It is a beautiful part of the world. We drove to Mystic, and I confess in the weakness of my memory I had mixed up Mystic with New Bedford, so I gratefully stand corrected. The cup of clam chowder I had for lunch in Mystic has grown in the recollection into one of the most fantabulous pieces of sustenance a human being could dream of.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Thu Mar 01, 2012 3:16 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6729
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2062
Thanked: 2310 times in 1744 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Robert Tulip wrote:
DWill wrote:
New Bedford isn't in my native state of Connecticut


ouchiwawa. Thank you. Well at least Connecticut would be a connecting path, he pleads aimlessly? If I can share some personal history, in 1977 my father taught English at Yale University for a year, and we lived as a family in Hamden for 8 months. It is a beautiful part of the world. We drove to Mystic, and I confess in the weakness of my memory I had mixed up Mystic with New Bedford, so I gratefully stand corrected. The cup of clam chowder I had for lunch in Mystic has grown in the recollection into one of the most fantabulous pieces of sustenance a human being could dream of.

Maybe the clam chowder would be for you like Proust's madeleine cake, if you were to have it again. My family lived on Long Island Sound, in Guilford, where my father was a veterinarian. I went to Hopkins Grammar School in New haven for a year in eighth grade, before we moved inland to Storrs, where Dad got a job teaching at UConn. I took several school field trips to Mystic Seaport and can still recall especially the smells of the place.



Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:56 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5994
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2421
Thanked: 2356 times in 1782 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
DWill wrote:
Proust's madeleine cake


In Search of Lost Time certainly rivals Moby Dick or The Whale for the magnificence of the ordinary. The closest I came to an encounter with Proust, apart from the legendary Summarizing Proust Competition, was Alain De Botton's Proust book.* We might consider how Melville can change your life as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madeleine_(cake)

Marcel Proust wrote:
No sooner had the warm liquid mixed with the crumbs touched my palate than a shudder ran through me and I stopped, intent upon the extraordinary thing that was happening to me. An exquisite pleasure had invaded my senses, something isolated, detached, with no suggestion of its origin. And at once the vicissitudes of life had become indifferent to me, its disasters innocuous, its brevity illusory – this new sensation having had on me the effect which love has of filling me with a precious essence; or rather this essence was not in me it was me. ... Whence did it come? What did it mean? How could I seize and apprehend it? ... And suddenly the memory revealed itself. The taste was that of the little piece of madeleine which on Sunday mornings at Combray (because on those mornings I did not go out before mass), when I went to say good morning to her in her bedroom, my aunt Léonie used to give me, dipping it first in her own cup of tea or tisane. The sight of the little madeleine had recalled nothing to my mind before I tasted it. And all from my cup of tea.


http://www.alaindebotton.com/literature.asp

Alain de Botton wrote:
The starting point of How Proust can change your Life is that a great novel can be nothing less than life-transforming. This is an unusual claim: our education system, while stressing that novels are highly worthwhile, rarely investigates why this is so. How Proust can change your Life takes Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time as the basis for a sustained investigation into the power and significance of literature. Proust’s novel, almost a byword for obscurity and irrelevance, emerges as an invaluable source of insight into the workings of love, society, art and the meaning of existence. The book reveals Proust’s thoughts on how to revive a relationship, choose a good doctor, enjoy a holiday, make friends and respond to insult. A vivid portrait of the eccentric yet deeply sympathetic author is built up out of extracts from his letters, essays and fiction and is combined with a commentary on the power of literature to change our lives. A self-help book like few others.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Fri Mar 02, 2012 3:53 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5994
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2421
Thanked: 2356 times in 1782 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
someone somewhere wrote:
Not to be a scold Robert

Well guess what? Jumping ahead to Chapter 16, Melville says the Pequod Indians, source of the name of Captain Ahab's famous vessel, were from Massachussets. As any school boy knows, the Pequod Indians were from Connecticut!!!
Herman the Geographer and keen historian wrote:
PEQUOD, you will no doubt remember, was the name of a celebrated tribe of Massachusetts Indians; now extinct as the ancient Medes

And yet, proving my case that greater minds than me have confused these states ...
wikipedia wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pequot Pequot people (pronounced /ˈpiːˌkwɑːt/)[1] are a tribe of Native Americans who, in the 17th century, inhabited much of what is now Connecticut.

Let us hope the Pequod fares better than the Medes


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Last edited by Robert Tulip on Sat Mar 03, 2012 5:04 am, edited 1 time in total.



The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
Chris OConnor
Sat Mar 03, 2012 5:01 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Intern


Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 155
Location: British Columbia
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 16 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: Canada (ca)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
DWill wrote:
Not to be a scold, Robert, since you know more about America than I know about Australia, but New Bedford isn't in my native state of Connecticut, but rather Massachusetts.


Oh good. Prior to coming onto this site I wanted to know exactly where we were and Googled New Bedford.



Sat Mar 03, 2012 8:18 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Intern


Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 155
Location: British Columbia
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 16 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: Canada (ca)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Robert Tulip wrote:
someone somewhere wrote:
Not to be a scold Robert

Well guess what? Jumping ahead to Chapter 16, Melville says the Pequod Indians, source of the name of Captain Ahab's famous vessel, were from Massachussets. As any school boy knows, the Pequod Indians were from Connecticut!!!


:lol: Okay we know its over there somewhere. The furthest east I have ever been is Winnipeg Manitoba. I find those tiny eastern states a cluster of confusion.



Sat Mar 03, 2012 8:27 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Intern


Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 155
Location: British Columbia
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 16 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: Canada (ca)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
At the end of chapter 2 I really didn't know what all the ranting was about with Lazarus, Euroclydon, Dives and Moluccas. Over my head.

I did like the name of that one Inn he thought he was going into. Turns out it was a church called The Trap.



Sat Mar 03, 2012 8:44 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Owner
Diamond Contributor 3

Joined: May 2002
Posts: 16315
Location: Florida
Thanks: 3581
Thanked: 1374 times in 1077 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
I too am confused about the references to "Lazarus, Euroclydon, Dives and Moluccas."

Can someone explain?



Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:11 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6729
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2062
Thanked: 2310 times in 1744 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Damifino wrote:
Robert Tulip wrote:
someone somewhere wrote:
Not to be a scold Robert

Well guess what? Jumping ahead to Chapter 16, Melville says the Pequod Indians, source of the name of Captain Ahab's famous vessel, were from Massachussets. As any school boy knows, the Pequod Indians were from Connecticut!!!


:lol: Okay we know its over there somewhere. The furthest east I have ever been is Winnipeg Manitoba. I find those tiny eastern states a cluster of confusion.

And to this day I am confused! No wonder.



Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:24 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6729
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2062
Thanked: 2310 times in 1744 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Chris OConnor wrote:
I too am confused about the references to "Lazarus, Euroclydon, Dives and Moluccas."

Can someone explain?

HM's wit and erudition goes a bit past me, I'm afraid. I can look up the Lazarus and Dives parable and understand that this poor guy is the beggar Lazurus (not the man who rose from the dead) and someone else is being compared to the rich man known as Dives, who ignored Lazurus and wound up in hell with a "redder," or quite hot, scarf around his neck. And that's about as far as I get with this allegory.

Euroclydon is apparently just a mythic name for a strong wind. It nearly capsized Paul's boat in the NT. I assume that Ishmael quotes himself as the authority on this, since he says he owns the only copy extant.



Sat Mar 03, 2012 10:47 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5994
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2421
Thanked: 2356 times in 1782 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Damifino wrote:
I really didn't know what all the ranting was about with Lazarus, Euroclydon, Dives and Molucca


Here is the text in question, and my interpretation. These references are Biblical. You can ignore them as asides, but they do add to the story in a context where American society was rather seized by Christian heritage.
HM wrote:
Coffin?—Spouter?—Rather ominous in that particular connexion, thought I. But it is a common name in Nantucket, they say, and I suppose this Peter here is an emigrant from there. As the light looked so dim, and the place, for the time, looked quiet enough, and the dilapidated little wooden house itself looked as if it might have been carted here from the ruins of some burnt district, and as the swinging sign had a poverty-stricken sort of creak to it, I thought that here was the very spot for cheap lodgings, and the best of pea coffee. It was a queer sort of place—a gable-ended old house, one side palsied as it were, and leaning over sadly. It stood on a sharp bleak corner, where that tempestuous wind Euroclydon kept up a worse howling than ever it did about poor Paul's tossed craft.
This description of his lodgings as a sort of spasticated hovel aims to set the scene for the harsh roughness of whaling.

Euroclydon, as I mentioned above, is a Biblical reference from Acts 27:14, translated as the "Northeaster" in this version: "The Storm: 13 When a gentle south wind began to blow, they saw their opportunity; so they weighed anchor and sailed along the shore of Crete. 14 Before very long, a wind of hurricane force, called the Northeaster, swept down from the island. 15 The ship was caught by the storm and could not head into the wind; so we gave way to it and were driven along. 16 As we passed to the lee of a small island called Cauda, we were hardly able to make the lifeboat secure, 17 so the men hoisted it aboard. Then they passed ropes under the ship itself to hold it together. Because they were afraid they would run aground on the sandbars of Syrtis, they lowered the sea anchor[b] and let the ship be driven along. 18 We took such a violent battering from the storm that the next day they began to throw the cargo overboard. 19 On the third day, they threw the ship’s tackle overboard with their own hands. 20 When neither sun nor stars appeared for many days and the storm continued raging, we finally gave up all hope of being saved. 21 After they had gone a long time without food, Paul stood up before them and said: “Men, you should have taken my advice not to sail from Crete; then you would have spared yourselves this damage and loss. 22 But now I urge you to keep up your courage, because not one of you will be lost; only the ship will be destroyed. 23 Last night an angel of the God to whom I belong and whom I serve stood beside me 24 and said, ‘Do not be afraid, Paul. You must stand trial before Caesar; and God has graciously given you the lives of all who sail with you.’ 25 So keep up your courage, men, for I have faith in God that it will happen just as he told me. 26 Nevertheless, we must run aground on some island.”

Melville assumes familiarity with the Bible. And the Bible itself, in the New Testament, was written with assumed familiarity with the Old Testament. Here, as Melville will return to soon, the Euroclydon wind makes us think of the prophet Jonah who, the story relates, spent three days and three nights in the belly of a whale (or large fish). Saint Paul seems to do better than Jonah because Paul is travelling to do the will of God, whereas Jonah travelled to escape from God's specific instruction. Anyway, this Euroclydon gives us the image that the Spouter Inn is like a storm tossed whaling ship.

Quote:
Euroclydon, nevertheless, is a mighty pleasant zephyr to any one in-doors, with his feet on the hob quietly toasting for bed. "In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon," says an old writer—of whose works I possess the only copy extant—"it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier."
My hunch is that Melville is just making up his claim to have the only surviving copy of an ancient book of wisdom, this being a rather standard trope, much exploited by religious charlatans such as the Mormons, whom Melville is laughing at. It is one of those homely Ben Franklin style pieces of spun wisdom that are just platitudes - 'better warm before a fire than shivering in a howling gale'. And yet, Melville seems here to also have a dig at Saint Paul, who said that now we see Christ through a glass darkly but in the second coming he will appear face to face. Melville observes that a glass window is much to be appreciated in the observation of gales.
Quote:
True enough, thought I, as this passage occurred to my mind—old black-letter, thou reasonest well.
A dig at Biblical fundamentalists who regard the written text as inerrantly correct in every respect. There is a faint air of the ridiculous in imagining Franklin's almanac as contradicting the message of Saint Paul, if that be the idea just below the surface of this innocuous writing.
Quote:
Yes, these eyes are windows, and this body of mine is the house. What a pity they didn't stop up the chinks and the crannies though, and thrust in a little lint here and there. But it's too late to make any improvements now. The universe is finished; the copestone is on, and the chips were carted off a million years ago.
Now Melville's sermonizing against Christianity is getting into gear, with his observation that Paul's description of the body as the temple of the holy spirit shows that God made some mysterious mistakes as a designer, and in fact finished his work well before the literal story of Adam and Eve. Interesting that before Darwin's Origin of Species was even written this evolutionary debate was already in the air.
Quote:
Poor Lazarus there, chattering his teeth against the curbstone for his pillow, and shaking off his tatters with his shiverings, he might plug up both ears with rags, and put a corn-cob into his mouth, and yet that would not keep out the tempestuous Euroclydon. Euroclydon! says old Dives, in his red silken wrapper—(he had a redder one afterwards) pooh, pooh! What a fine frosty night; how Orion glitters; what northern lights! Let them talk of their oriental summer climes of everlasting conservatories; give me the privilege of making my own summer with my own coals.
The well known Bible story of Dives and Lazarus is told only at Luke 16. It says the poor go to heaven and the rich go to hell, so serves as an important proto-Marxist consolation for the envious resentment of those who lack material goods in this life. Dives sits before the warm fire inside where he makes his own coal summer while Lazarus shivers like the little match girl starving and freezing in the snow. Dives will be even warmer when Satan roasts him for all eternity :twisted: :P :mrgreen:
Quote:
But what thinks Lazarus? Can he warm his blue hands by holding them up to the grand northern lights? Would not Lazarus rather be in Sumatra than here? Would he not far rather lay him down lengthwise along the line of the equator; yea, ye gods! go down to the fiery pit itself, in order to keep out this frost? Now, that Lazarus should lie stranded there on the curbstone before the door of Dives, this is more wonderful than that an iceberg should be moored to one of the Moluccas. Yet Dives himself, he too lives like a Czar in an ice palace made of frozen sighs, and being a president of a temperance society, he only drinks the tepid tears of orphans.
This constant inversion of Bible stories opens the question of whether people are happier in the warm climates of Indonesia (Sumatra and the Moluccas are whaling destinations), or in the freezing north. The image of Dives the rich Christian is a sort of Calvinist Quaker oppressor, indifferent to human suffering (and may it be said, whale suffering). Traditionally of course, Dives was a Roman pagan, while Lazarus was the pious poor Christian Egyptian, whose name had mutated from the old fertility god Osiris. Now Melville sees everything topsy turvy, the first are last and the last first, and Dives has converted to the One True Faith so he can subsist on orphan tears rather than alcohol. The futility of religion is illustrated by the idea that poor people can warm themselves by the light of the aurora borealis. This whole cryptic rant questions the hypocritical morality of established religion, but it seems, in such obscure Cervantean language that Melville will need fear no inquisition.

Dives and Lazarus from the Book of Hours
Image
Lazarus and Dives. The parable of Lazarus and Dives was an appropriate story to illustrate the Office of the Dead because it emphasized one's damnation or salvation after death. In the miniature, the rich man Dives feasts while a leper called Lazarus holds a clapper to warn of his approach. Dives refuses to give Lazarus even the scraps from the table. The second part of the story is depicted in the background. Lazarus and Dives are dead, and while Lazarus is taken to heaven, Dives burns in the flames of hell.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Sat Mar 03, 2012 11:40 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Doctorate


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 508
Thanks: 48
Thanked: 123 times in 102 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 2. The Carpet-Bag
Thanks Robert, very illuminating. Damifino - am shamed to say I often just skip passages I don't understand.


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:14 pm
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Community Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Book Discussion Leaders

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
Banned Books
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
Promote your FICTION book
Promote your NON-FICTION book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2019. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank