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Trump is not a joke 
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
Even Rush Limbaugh denounces Trump.

Hence, the falsity of Trump being the "new face of the republicans"

Only a far left lib would utter such a generalized falsehood out of spite for the right.


http://www.salon.com/2016/05/10/rush_li ... socialflow



Tue May 10, 2016 3:56 pm
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions ... story.html

Robert Kagan writes a monthly foreign affairs column for The Washington Post, and is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Kagan served in the State Department from 1984 to 1988.

Robert Kagan wrote:
This is how fascism comes to America, not with jackboots and salutes (although there have been salutes, and a whiff of violence) but with a television huckster, a phony billionaire, a textbook egomaniac “tapping into” popular resentments and insecurities, and with an entire national political party — out of ambition or blind party loyalty, or simply out of fear — falling into line behind him.


Kagan’s article helps to illustrate that the USA is on a slide to a fascist military dictatorship. Even if Trump fails to win against Clinton in 2016, he has shown that such a candidacy is possible and emotionally addictive. Donald Trump will be permanently campaigning for the 2020 Presidential election, distracting the political process much as Adolph Hitler did in Germany in the lead up to the 1933 Nazi Revolution. Hitler’s failed 1923 Munich Beer Hall Putsch led to him being given a spacious jail cell where he wrote Mein Kampf, while the people watched in paralysed fascination like a mouse before a snake. The inability of a democratic liberal polity to respond effectively is exploited by the dictator without scruple.

I am a strong admirer of the USA, in its cultural and economic vitality and values, but at the same time I have long thought that the USA had much in common with Nazi Germany. The ‘animal spirits’ of German technology and emotion have been central to American power and society. America’s links to Germany go back to the close run thing of the American vote on use of German language in 1794. The Republican Party has an emotional fascist strand of delighting in raw power going back to Big Stick Teddy. The Democrats are not immune either, going back as far as Andrew Jackson’s role in the Trail of Tears and the whole slavery story.

American failure to enter the world wars until 1917 and 1941 showed strong sympathy for Germany despite its aggressive behaviour. The idea that Hitler was somehow outside the boundaries of humanity, a monster rather than a man, as indicated by the evil trauma of the Holocaust, has almost created an inability to learn the lessons from the war. However, the cultural relationship was so important that it was put into the mythic form of the Superman story, modelled on the clash between Superman representing the USA and Lex Luthor representing Germany. Nixon and Kissinger’s prosecution of the Vietnam War involved a sort of ‘lebensraum’ attitude to western frontier expansion, although the power of democratic liberal political scrutiny prevented a crude repeat of Hitler’s attitude towards the Slavs. When Ronald Reagan faced down the Soviet Union over missiles in Germany in the 1980s, there was widespread fear of a possible nuclear war provoked by American containment of Russia. There is a spiritual current of German fascism running through American politics, what Nietzsche called the blond beast, occasionally bursting into view and at other times kept hidden.

The military and prison industrial complexes dominate the American economy and create systemic political distortions and pathological cultural failures. Both these massive institutional complexes severely undermine productivity and policy in the name of machismo. When machismo becomes the basis of policy, you are on a reckless path of denial and danger, creating the opening for a demagogue who will unleash animal spirits. The media culture of placing popularity above truth has led to a delusional fantasy mentality dominating American public life. Like in Ancient Rome, the old institutions of the republic do not serve the emerging political needs of an empire. American politics is bursting at the seams, looking to escape its democratic constraints. The imperial scale of modern America means that the capture of the state by an emperor could produce a phase shift, shutting down democracy.

In my slightly crazy reading of history, comparing America to Ancient Rome, one theme that I have explored in some detail is the Biblical story of the beast of the apocalypse. Traditionally associated with Rome, I see this myth from Revelation 13 as having quite strong lessons for the USA. For example, marks of the beast include the role of the United States Dollar as the global reserve currency, the power to make the whole world watch in wonder, and the underlying ability to rely on deceit and fantasy and violence. The challenge, in terms of global cultural evolution, is whether any external influence can shift America from leading the whole world in a mad plunge towards doom and war and instead create a new political and social and cultural paradigm. I don’t see how a domestic conversation in the USA alone would be enough to turn around the current dangerous trajectory.

Quote:
By Robert Kagan
Opinions
May 18

The Republican Party’s attempt to treat Donald Trump as a normal political candidate would be laughable were it not so perilous to the republic. If only he would mouth the party’s “conservative” principles, all would be well.

But of course the entire Trump phenomenon has nothing to do with policy or ideology. It has nothing to do with the Republican Party, either, except in its historic role as incubator of this singular threat to our democracy. Trump has transcended the party that produced him. His growing army of supporters no longer cares about the party. Because it did not immediately and fully embrace Trump, because a dwindling number of its political and intellectual leaders still resist him, the party is regarded with suspicion and even hostility by his followers. Their allegiance is to him and him alone.

And the source of allegiance? We’re supposed to believe that Trump’s support stems from economic stagnation or dislocation. Maybe some of it does. But what Trump offers his followers are not economic remedies — his proposals change daily. What he offers is an attitude, an aura of crude strength and machismo, a boasting disrespect for the niceties of the democratic culture that he claims, and his followers believe, has produced national weakness and incompetence. His incoherent and contradictory utterances have one thing in common: They provoke and play on feelings of resentment and disdain, intermingled with bits of fear, hatred and anger. His public discourse consists of attacking or ridiculing a wide range of “others” — Muslims, Hispanics, women, Chinese, Mexicans, Europeans, Arabs, immigrants, refugees — whom he depicts either as threats or as objects of derision. His program, such as it is, consists chiefly of promises to get tough with foreigners and people of nonwhite complexion. He will deport them, bar them, get them to knuckle under, make them pay up or make them shut up.

That this tough-guy, get-mad-and-get-even approach has gained him an increasingly large and enthusiastic following has probably surprised Trump as much as anyone else. Trump himself is simply and quite literally an egomaniac. But the phenomenon he has created and now leads has become something larger than him, and something far more dangerous.

Republican politicians marvel at how he has “tapped into” a hitherto unknown swath of the voting public. But what he has tapped into is what the founders most feared when they established the democratic republic: the popular passions unleashed, the “mobocracy.” Conservatives have been warning for decades about government suffocating liberty. But here is the other threat to liberty that Alexis de Tocqueville and the ancient philosophers warned about: that the people in a democracy, excited, angry and unconstrained, might run roughshod over even the institutions created to preserve their freedoms. As Alexander Hamilton watched the French Revolution unfold, he feared in America what he saw play out in France — that the unleashing of popular passions would lead not to greater democracy but to the arrival of a tyrant, riding to power on the shoulders of the people.

This phenomenon has arisen in other democratic and quasi-democratic countries over the past century, and it has generally been called “fascism.” Fascist movements, too, had no coherent ideology, no clear set of prescriptions for what ailed society. “National socialism” was a bundle of contradictions, united chiefly by what, and who, it opposed; fascism in Italy was anti-liberal, anti-democratic, anti-Marxist, anti-capitalist and anti-clerical. Successful fascism was not about policies but about the strongman, the leader (Il Duce, Der Führer), in whom could be entrusted the fate of the nation. Whatever the problem, he could fix it. Whatever the threat, internal or external, he could vanquish it, and it was unnecessary for him to explain how. Today, there is Putinism, which also has nothing to do with belief or policy but is about the tough man who single-handedly defends his people against all threats, foreign and domestic.

To understand how such movements take over a democracy, one only has to watch the Republican Party today. These movements play on all the fears, vanities, ambitions and insecurities that make up the human psyche. In democracies, at least for politicians, the only thing that matters is what the voters say they want — vox populi vox Dei. A mass political movement is thus a powerful and, to those who would oppose it, frightening weapon. When controlled and directed by a single leader, it can be aimed at whomever the leader chooses. If someone criticizes or opposes the leader, it doesn’t matter how popular or admired that person has been. He might be a famous war hero, but if the leader derides and ridicules his heroism, the followers laugh and jeer. He might be the highest-ranking elected guardian of the party’s most cherished principles. But if he hesitates to support the leader, he faces political death.

In such an environment, every political figure confronts a stark choice: Get right with the leader and his mass following or get run over. The human race in such circumstances breaks down into predictable categories — and democratic politicians are the most predictable. There are those whose ambition leads them to jump on the bandwagon. They praise the leader’s incoherent speeches as the beginning of wisdom, hoping he will reward them with a plum post in the new order. There are those who merely hope to survive. Their consciences won’t let them curry favor so shamelessly, so they mumble their pledges of support, like the victims in Stalin’s show trials, perhaps not realizing that the leader and his followers will get them in the end anyway.

A great number will simply kid themselves, refusing to admit that something very different from the usual politics is afoot. Let the storm pass, they insist, and then we can pick up the pieces, rebuild and get back to normal. Meanwhile, don’t alienate the leader’s mass following. After all, they are voters and will need to be brought back into the fold. As for Trump himself, let’s shape him, advise him, steer him in the right direction and, not incidentally, save our political skins.

What these people do not or will not see is that, once in power, Trump will owe them and their party nothing. He will have ridden to power despite the party, catapulted into the White House by a mass following devoted only to him. By then that following will have grown dramatically. Today, less than 5 percent of eligible voters have voted for Trump. But if he wins the election, his legions will likely comprise a majority of the nation. Imagine the power he would wield then. In addition to all that comes from being the leader of a mass following, he would also have the immense powers of the American presidency at his command: the Justice Department, the FBI, the intelligence services, the military. Who would dare to oppose him then? Certainly not a Republican Party that lay down before him even when he was comparatively weak. And is a man like Trump, with infinitely greater power in his hands, likely to become more humble, more judicious, more generous, less vengeful than he is today, than he has been his whole life? Does vast power un-corrupt?

This is how fascism comes to America, not with jackboots and salutes (although there have been salutes, and a whiff of violence) but with a television huckster, a phony billionaire, a textbook egomaniac “tapping into” popular resentments and insecurities, and with an entire national political party — out of ambition or blind party loyalty, or simply out of fear — falling into line behind him.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions ... story.html


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Sun May 22, 2016 9:35 pm
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
This seems an overwrought reaction, by Kagan and you, Robert, though it's articulate as always. The one hope I have that you both are wrong is what has happened already to Trump's major pronouncements, now that he has all but secured the nomination. He can't run in the general election on his pledge to have Mexico build a wall, deport 11 million Hispanics, bar Muslims from entering the country, self-fund his campaign, etc., so now we see him and his spokesmen falling away from these macho boasts. Details about his backpedaling have been all over the print media. This is the "evolution" of Trump toward statesmanship, a reality TV script that Trump hopes will expand his appeal while not alienating the base that gave him the nomination. It will require skillful manipulation, but he might be up to it. If by some strange circumstance he does become president, it's very unlikely that he then would have the political power to pivot back to his original positions, even if he had true conviction about them, which he doesn't. He only knew they would play well in 2015 and the first months of 2016.



Mon May 23, 2016 6:58 am
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
It is disturbing . We have a a blonde millionaire too who pretends to be a buffoon. Who is campaigning for us to leave the EU...,, even though he doesn't care either way really...it will make no difference to him. But our PM is campaigning to stay in...,so Boris Johnson , also member of the odious Bullingdon Club At Eton, is going the opposite way to the PM in a bid for leadership. Humph....I only feel
Disgruntled ....We'll get what we bloody well deserve whatever....


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Mon May 23, 2016 9:12 am
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
Penelope wrote:
It is disturbing . We have a a blonde millionaire too who pretends to be a buffoon. Who is campaigning for us to leave the EU...,, even though he doesn't care either way really...it will make no difference to him. But our PM is campaigning to stay in...,so Boris Johnson , also member of the odious Bullingdon Club At Eton, is going the opposite way to the PM in a bid for leadership. Humph....I only feel
Disgruntled ....We'll get what we bloody well deserve whatever....



What's wrong with him being blonde? I don't get it.



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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
I'm reading Assholes--A Theory of Donald Trump by Aaron James--a Harvard Ph.D. and professor and chair of philosophy at the University of California. Irvine. Professor James defines an asshole as "the guy (they are mainly men) who systematically allows himself advantages in social relationships out of an entrenched (and mistaken) sense of entitlement that immunizes him against the complaints of other people."

I've met many Americans who are nationalistic assholes along the lines of, "Well, who gives a shit what the rest of the world thinks of us. Fuck them! They're just jealous." There may be some truth to this in that it must be nice to be an asshole and consistently get away with it to the point where you engender envy and/or admiration even if it is grudging. In fact, to an asshole, grudging respect is the best kind.

An asshole differs from a jerk in that a jerk knows he is a jerk and often apologizes for it: "Forgive me for interrupting..." or "Sorry for what I said last night." We are all jerks from time to time because we know it. I've interrupted people knowing I was being rude, for example. And we can all be assholes too. But the true asshole doesn't apologize because he doesn't see himself as doing anything wrong. He talks over you because you forced him to by talking and since his opinion is more important that yours, he felt entitled to trample over your words and take over the conversation. Some assholes even consider this ability to be "natural born leadership."

I once knew a guy who told a room full of people that no matter what the situation, he has to be the boss. He stated that he has been that way since he was a little kid. "I have to be the one in charge," he said, and was given applause by the others in the room!! I thought, "But what if you're not qualified and someone else is and they resent you being in charge in a situation of which you know nothing?" I realize that assholes are assholes often because those around them defer to them.

Why do we defer to them? Often because they have a trait the rest of us don't: he's stronger than the rest of us or he's more athletic or he's better looking or better educated...or he's wealthy. Any of these traits or combination of them add to one thing--a winner. They'll succeed where we fail because they are natural winners. As winners, they are embued with a sense of entitlement--they feel they are the best--not just better--the best.

What about Ted Cruz? Is he an asshole? James says yes but he demonstrates a different form of assholism. Where Trump is anti-intellectual, Cruz is highly educated and polished. Where Trump is scrappy, Cruz is oily smooth. Where Trump is uncouth and rude, Cruz is obsequious and beguiling. Where Trump speaks and has no real idea of what he's saying or why, Cruz knows very well what he is saying and why. Cruz is the type of asshole rejected by the same people who find Trump's assholism so appealing. Trump you could grab a beer with, let him talk, and have a few laughs (at his expense, he's too obtuse to notice); Cruz will let you talk while he drinks and when you're good and tipsy he will suddenly ask you your IQ in deadpan (and, yes, he actually did that to law school class mate). Trump will say he's patriotic and mean it even though he clearly hasn't really given the idea any thought; Cruz has given it a great deal of thought and so says he is patriotic because he knows it's expected of him. You get the idea.

Before we talk anymore about political assholes, let's examine the word itself--asshole. Why do we call certain people an asshole? What all assholes have in common is that they are deeply bothersome people, supremely annoying. They don't just get on your nerves, they get on your last nerve. Dealing with them makes you want to scream. Their memory is a foul pollution of the mind. So we name this person after a part of the body from which oozes the foulest of filth, a part so unsavory that we hide it in public and referring to it is taboo because it is so dirty. So we reserve this word for only the worst type of person that we might have to deal with on a daily basis (psychopaths, rapists, murderers, etc. don't count but are a whole different animal and of no interest to us).


Trump is an assclown (i.e. a showman who loves to be the center of attention but doesn't understand how his audience sees him), and a bullshitter (i.e. someone who speaks with no regard for the truth because the truth has nothing to do with why he is saying it). Trump doesn't tell you he's going to ban Muslims from entering the country because he's trying to deceive you. He believes what he is saying. Most politicians don't say such things because they don't want to sound intolerant but, moreover, most of them have some idea of what an extremely difficult route they would be choosing, that it would end up a doomed venture and even if they achieved it they would have expended a great deal of political capital for a pitifully small gain. Trump's reason for talking about it has nothing to do with whether it is achievable; his reason for talking about it is to show his audience who he is. He is telling them, "This is the kind of guy I am." It is simply an en extension of his "Hey, everybody, look at me!" assclown nature. Unlike "establishment politicians," Trumpspeak is crude, unrefined and thrown about loosely and carelessly--obliviously so--and hence appears to his fans that he is "telling it like it is." If his fans got any inkling from him that he was just bullshitting them, they'd desert him in an instant. It is Trump's ability to bullshit by buying into his own bullshit while he's saying it that hooks them. The caveat is that he may not buy his own bullshit on that topic tomorrow or even remember he said it. And when he says, " I don't remember saying that," he means that too.

Were Trump viewed as an establishment politician, he could never have gotten away with the "thousands cheering in New Jersey on 9/11" remark. Trump did two things establishment politicians don't do--he made the accusation in the first place and refused to back down on it even though it was clearly and patently false. The hallmarks for a real bullshitter.

But we're not done yet. His bullshitter crown comes down to him not through his hazy recall of facts and his steadfast refusals to own being wrong about them but because Trump has mastered the art of the insult. Call him out and by morning Twitter will be crackling with Trump's insults and everybody laughing over them. The unofficial rule of the GOP is that he with the best insults wins. None of the other candidates proved any sort of a match for Trump's barbs which he wielded masterfully to the point that he may have permanently ruined some of their chances for future office (e.g. "Little Marco" "Lyin' Ted"). Rubio came back with the "small hands" thing which would have worked for Trump but cannot work for him because it seemed below his dignity. Even rubio expressed regret at having resorted to it which shows the chasm of difference between him and Trump. Trump has no dignity and can resort to such childishness with impunity. Such is the sack of weirdness that is the Republican Party. Trump is the last man standing simply because he had the insults that stuck and stung the deepest. The establishment candidates were unable to shrug off the insults as hard as they tried. Trump hurled them with the same careless whimsy that he tossed around his non-facts but they found their targets and stuck. The more the other candidates tried to ignore them, the more ridiculous they looked--like trying to give a serious speech with your face covered with pie. And the rest of the party began to fall in line because not to do so risks the same scathing insults unleashed upon their heads in the next morning's Twitter feeds--insults they might end up wearing for the rest of their careers as Little Marco and Lyin' Ted will surely wear theirs.

What drives Trump is his need to be seen as superior to others. He's oblivious to how others see him but he wants to be seen as superior. That's why the "small hands" fiasco worked on Trump so that he couldn't shrug it off. This idea that people would not see him as perfect was too much to bear. '

We could go on but get the book. It's not very big, an easy read. James also gives the pros and cons of having a President Trump. You'll have to decide which is a better case.



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Mon May 23, 2016 9:45 pm
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
FYI for those interested in a shorter read, The Atlantic cover story in the June issue is "The Mind of Donald Trump." I haven't had a chance to read it yet. It's online.



Tue May 24, 2016 6:32 am
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
Is Ok to be blonde, ant. But the in Ancient Greek theatre it was the symbol of BIMBO. However, I am not liking these two blokes, Trump and Johnson... And it ain't just because my hair is silver. Xxxx


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Tue May 24, 2016 11:40 am
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
Penelope wrote:
Is Ok to be blonde, ant. But the in Ancient Greek theatre it was the symbol of BIMBO. However, I am not liking these two blokes, Trump and Johnson... And it ain't just because my hair is silver. Xxxx


Hi Penelope. I thought maybe you were referring to my mention above of the "blond beast" by Nietzsche.


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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/20-of- ... 2016-06-21

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/arc ... ad/488003/


Trump campaign nearly broke but 20% of it's revenue goes to Trump-owned businesses and to the Trump family. Trump has fired his campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski at the behest of his (Trump's) family. He has raised very little money as of late and yet is jetting off to Scotland to tend to a failing golf course there instead of staying here and working on his campaign. For 2 seconds, he tried to be a party unifier by reading from not one but TWO teleprompters. The result was that it was clear he did not write the speech and had not even vetted it. He would read a line, raise his eyebrows and say, "Well, it's about time!" And he was totally oblivious to how that looked.

His attempts at being a party unifier ended after a gunman mowed down 49 people at an Orlando nightclub when Trump stated afterward that the gunman's parents should never have been allowed to immigrate and that Obama is sympathetic to Muslim extremists. The gunman was obviously not a Muslim extremist since he expressed support for several radical groups that are opposed to each other. He instead appeared to be man confused about his own sexuality and couldn't cope with it.

Trump stated that, if need be, he would self-fund his campaign--an odd thing to say since he is already charging his own campaign for his various companies' services. Then there's this:

http://www.newyorker.com/news/john-cass ... -you-think

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/T ... 57741.html

Trump is in deep shit over Trump University. First off, it not only was NOT a university, it broke the law calling itself such before the plug was pulled on it in 2011. The pitch was classic bait & switch--promise one thing but deliver another. In this case, Trump promised to make people rich by teaching them his secrets of deal-making in real estate and instead just took their money. The teaching materials were not written by Trump or even reviewed by him but were purchased by some company that specializes in writing motivational speaker bullshit used by scammers all over the country. "Faculty" were taught how to scam attendees by selling the most expensive programs and seminars including $35,000 for an "elite membership." Statements made were blatantly false, e.g. Trump handpicked all the instructors when he didn't pick any of them or that he attended the seminars himself when he did not attend any.

Trump faces racketeering charges and goes on trial November 28 and didn't help his chances by dragging in the judge's Mexican heritage. Clinton's email problems pale in comparison. While she could face jail time theoretically, it would be highly unlikely even if found guilty. The likelihood that she seriously compromised national security is small, very much smaller still that she committed espionage, and so probably will not be charged at all. The republicans keep saying the scandal will destroy her campaign but have thus not provided any evidence of this occurring which indicates that there probably is not as much to it as they would like the public to believe. Trump, however, is a different story. If found guilty, how could he not do jail time having committed fraud?

Still, he has unwavering support. How? How could anyone attack Clinton's email scandal and ignore Trump's defrauding ordinary Americans of tens of thousands of dollars? How do they ignore the shoddy, questionable campaign he is running? How do they ignore the crazy, racist statements that he can't stop from blabbering at every available opportunity? His statement that he could shoot someone in broad daylight and not lose his supporters was no exaggeration or idle boasting. He appears to be right.



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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
I've stopped trying to predict "peak Trump." The most glaring fact in this campaign is the extraordinary unattractiveness of Hillary Clinton to the voters. Her negatives have to be the only reason that a reckless and clueless oligarch like Trump can still be running neck and neck with her in polling.



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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
Polls are worthless. If they were worth anything, Romney would have been president in 2012. It wasn't even close and I feel the same thing will happen here. The Trump campaign is clearly in big trouble with funding. for somebody who is supposed to be so popular. While Clinton certainly has her own faults and I'm not crazy about her myself, I think a lot of the criticisms of her is a bunch of sexist bullshit. Really, is she any worse then any male candidates in this race or any male politicians in any race? She's getting criticized a lot more for doing the same shit that male candidates rarely get media scrutiny for. The same thing happened to Obama and we KNOW why that happened.



Sat Jun 25, 2016 11:52 am
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
DB Roy wrote:
Polls are worthless. If they were worth anything, Romney would have been president in 2012. It wasn't even close...

No. The polls had Obama winning. But Fox News and others were convinced the polls were wrong. The polls were claiming young voters would come out as strongly as they did in 2008. Fox News and others did not believe that was physically possible so they discounted the numbers. They woke up on election day firmly believing Romney would win. But young voters did show up in large numbers as the polls stated and the result was shocking to them, but not most people - or at least not to followers of fivethirtyeight.com.



Sat Jun 25, 2016 3:50 pm
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
DB Roy wrote:
Polls are worthless. If they were worth anything, Romney would have been president in 2012. It wasn't even close and I feel the same thing will happen here. The Trump campaign is clearly in big trouble with funding. for somebody who is supposed to be so popular. While Clinton certainly has her own faults and I'm not crazy about her myself, I think a lot of the criticisms of her is a bunch of sexist bullshit. Really, is she any worse then any male candidates in this race or any male politicians in any race? She's getting criticized a lot more for doing the same shit that male candidates rarely get media scrutiny for. The same thing happened to Obama and we KNOW why that happened.

That's an exaggeration about polls being worthless. Polls closest to the election showed Obama with the win; Romney's camp believed the polls were skewed. If polls in October show that HRC and DT are running close, we'll probably have a close election, at least in terms of the popular vote. Electoral margins can be wide even when the popular vote is close. Correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't you saying, as I think I was, that DT would not be able to get the nomination? It's not a done deal, but just about. If DT continues to rewrite the rules, will it matter so much that Hillary has all the money? I wasn't giving my own opinion of Clinton, just observing that a candidate with any standing would have to have an easy time against Trump. But she unfortunately is about as "inside" as a candidate could be, is not by any stretch a skillful politician, and has a long public record which makes it easy to attack her.



Sat Jun 25, 2016 7:41 pm
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Post Re: Trump is not a joke
We're quite a ways from that yet. When it comes time for people to pull that lever, most of the people saying they'll vote for Trump right now will think the better of it and go for the candidate who is least likely to cause a disaster. I know a guy right now who lost all his retirement 401 money and is pissed about it and saying he'll vote for Trump but I know he won't in the end. He's mad and he wants change which is not likely to happen under Clinton but do we really want the kind of change Trump may bring ? And the worst part is the not knowing. He hasn't shown us any real plan about anything other than he's going to build a wall and create a Muslim database. This is the kind of stuff voters start to think about when they enter the voting booth. The electoral vote will be hugely in favor of Clinton.

If Trump can rewrite the rules to the point where no money is needed to run for president,--well, just forget it--ain't gonna happen.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't you saying, as I think I was, that DT would not be able to get the nomination? It's not a done deal, but just about.


Yes, that was me and I still do not fully believe he'll get it. The dissent within the party may still force a contested convention. The rich fatcats who own the GOP have been strangely silent but are certainly not tearing open their purses for Trump. I wouldn't be surprised if they are up to something. The only faith I have left in the GOP is that they are still the same sneaky, underhanded, back-stabbing assholes that they've always been and I don't expect them to take this sitting down. Trump knows it which is why he has promised riots if he doesn't get the nomination. So we'll just have to see but I don't see this ending quietly. They know he's going to lose. And the only thing that could be worse is that he wins. I think the Trump University scandal is enough to take the nomination away. You can't have a guy running for president who charged with racketeering.



Sat Jun 25, 2016 11:53 pm
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