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Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

#127: Jan. - Mar. 2014 (Fiction)
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Chris OConnor

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Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12
calaf68
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Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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Chapters 7 -8

The meeting of Giovanni and Alfredo in the tomb of Verdi at the Casa di Riposo, I believe, is one of the most important chapters. This is where we learn the history of Alfredo del Monte, and more importantly, his take on the impact that the power of opera, and music in general, can have on a person's life. The development of the relationship between the two is established here. Alfredo takes on the role of Giovanni's deceased father. Giovanni provides companionship to Alfredo and someone who the old man can spew forth his stories of opera.

For now, that relationship will remain that way, until Alfredo finally hears Giovanni sing.

But for now, down in the tomb of Verdi, with the Hostias section of Verdi's Requiem being sung by Beniamino Gigli, Giovanni finds his teacher.
http://youtu.be/AvFFBssQSq0

After that, Giovanni's confidence rises, and he immediately goes to see his love, even though her father had warned him not too.

Chip LoCoco
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Crystalline
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Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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Chapters 7-12
“…but, when one lives with what I call background music, passion can be found…”. How true that is. I always paint while playing music, mostly classical, and I play it loudly. Some of my art can be seen at http://www.VictoriaNorvaisa.com.

I would have liked a more sensuous description/reaction from Giovanni, a Sicilian young man of 25, when Isabella came out on the balcony dressed only in a nightshirt. He noticed her legs and her underwear. But what about her firm, young breasts? (teasing the author just a little :)). I’m not sure that women wear underwear under a nightgown…well, perhaps some do.

I don’t know too much about voice training, but I found it a little strange that listening to others sing day after day and week after week was the proper method. I’m thinking that perhaps it could have been interspersed with some singing since Giovanni wanted to sing so badly, and it shows the stubbornness of an old man to do things his way…no bending here…very typical, but that’s just my reaction. I probably would have walked out on this teacher, but that shows how deeply Giovanni got attached to Alfredo in such a short time. That may have also been his need for a father figure as well as for a teacher.

The visit to Vicopelago reminded me of my visits to Todi and Orvieto in Italy. I knew exactly what the author was talking about and how truly unique and beautiful those hill towns are.

The many details, history, names of operas, arias and singers is a little too much detail for a reader like me, who likes but does not live opera. I’m sure classical music students would really appreciate this book. Market it to music schools and you will sell your million copies.

I also notice a very subtle, but sometimes awkward, sentence structure from time to time. Some of the sentences don’t seem to flow as beautifully as the music the author talks about. That makes me wonder if English was/is the author’s primary language? Again, not a criticism, just merely my opinion :).
That’s all, folks…reading on…
calaf68
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Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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Chapter 9-12

The Convent in Vicopelago does exist. And the story of Puccini's sister as the Mother Superior is true. I agree about the little hill towns of Italy. They are magical, forgotten places that beg to be explored. I would say at this juncture of the book, the storyline has been fully developed. Giovanni is embarked upon his quest with Alfredo and he and Isabella are beginning to learn about each other. The Casa Verdi is starting play a role, with introductions of a few residents who live there.

The book is getting a little more in depth here about singers, conductors, etc. The story about Caruso and his impact on recordings is true. Here is a clip of his famous 1904 recording from L'Elisir. What you have to keep in mind is that when he made these recordings, no one had heard such a thing. The ending of this aria is fantastic. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Miwejo0mgok

And now I must comment: Crystalline asks this: " That makes me wonder if English was/is the author’s primary language? Again, not a criticism, just merely my opinion :)."

Having been born and raised in New Orleans my entire life, you are correct that English is not my first language, as us New Orleanians speak different from the rest of the English speaking world, with phrases such as:

Who Dat
Where y'a at?
Ya'll
How's ya mama?
Mak'n groceries.

I also gave my wife your advice about nightgowns and underwear.

:lol:
Last edited by calaf68 on Fri Jan 10, 2014 2:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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LOL...Ok, Bubba, I'll remember that as I keep reading! Now I'll be listening to Caruso...
..........
Later...
Ok, Pavarotti is still my favorite: he had the voice, the passion, the facial expressions...he could have been a little better looking, more like Placido Domingo :roll: ; but in the end it's the voice that matters.
Yes, I understand that Caruso's recordings are old...
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Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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Interesting pictures, thanks.
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Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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Thanks Robert:

In the pictures of Verdi's Tomb, you can also see the outside of the Casa Verdi.

Also, I just wanted to post this. The aria is "Senza Mamma" from Suor Angelica by Puccini. This is the opera he wrote and then played for the nuns at the Convent. I think this is Puccini at his most melodic and emotional. The singer is Renata Scotto. Here she is singing in the courtyard of the convent when she has just been told about the death of her baby. This is also the story that Giovanni tells Isabella. The aria builds into something majestic and beautiful.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZBTwlPWTzg
Last edited by calaf68 on Fri Jan 10, 2014 9:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tempesta's Dream: Chapters 7 through 12

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Scotto's voice is magnificent. I'm especially enjoying these little snippets of music the author is injecting into our discussion. It makes the book come alive for me.
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