Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat May 15, 2021 12:44 pm





Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 23 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion! 
Author Message
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Intelligent


Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 557
Location: Connecticut
Thanks: 77
Thanked: 89 times in 80 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
Chris, some good suggestions so far. I'd still like to see something from the history or political science genres. Can you add one or two from the last poll we did a couple of months ago?



The following user would like to thank lindad_amato for this post:
Chris OConnor
Tue Feb 21, 2012 8:01 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I dumpster dive for books!

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor 2

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 1788
Thanks: 154
Thanked: 744 times in 556 posts
Gender: Male

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
This looks like an interesting one, a lot of independent chapters. In addition to the examples below, check out the table of contents on Amazon

This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/006210 ... d_i=507846

Quote:
What scientific concept would improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit? This is the question John Brockman, publisher of Edge.org, posed to the world’s most influential thinkers. Their visionary answers flow from the frontiers of psychology, philosophy, economics, physics, sociology, and more. Surprising and enlightening, these insights will revolutionize the way you think about yourself and the world.

Daniel Kahneman on the “focusing illusion” • Jonah Lehrer on controlling attention • Richard Dawkins on experimentation • Aubrey De Grey on conquering our fear of the unknown • Martin Seligman on the ingredients of well-being • Nicholas Carr on managing “cognitive load” • Steven Pinker on win-win negotiating • Daniel C. Dennett on benefiting from cycles • Jaron Lanier on resisting delusion • Frank Wilczek on the brain’s hidden layers • Clay Shirky on the “80/20 rule” • Daniel Goleman on understanding our connection to the natural world • V. S. Ramachandran on paradigm shifts • Matt Ridley on tapping collective intelligence • John McWhorter on path dependence • Lisa Randall on effective theorizing • Brian Eno on “ecological vision” • Richard Thaler on rooting out false concepts • J. Craig Venter on the multiple possible origins of life • Helen Fisher on temperament • Sam Harris on the flow of thought • Lawrence Krauss on living with uncertainty



The following user would like to thank Dexter for this post:
Chris OConnor
Tue Feb 21, 2012 8:32 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pop up Book Fanatic


Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 14
Location: Maui Hawaii
Thanks: 4
Thanked: 3 times in 3 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
I found David McCullough's Johnstown Flood a fascinating book. It comes in hardcover, paperback, audio, kindle editions. Amazon gives the book 4.5 stars from 123 customers. The Amazon link is amazon.com/Johnstown-Flood-ebook/dp/B00 ... B000QTD642. Amazon writeup on books says...

Amazon.com Review
The history of civil engineering may sound boring, but in David McCullough's hands it is, well, riveting. His award-winning histories of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Panama Canal were preceded by this account of the disastrous dam failure that drowned Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 1889. Written while the last survivors of the flood were still alive, McCullough's narrative weaves the stories of the town, the wealthy men who owned the dam, and the forces of nature into a seamless whole. His account is unforgettable: "The wave kept on coming straight toward him, heading for the very heart of the city. Stores, houses, trees, everything was going down in front of it, and the closer it came, the bigger it seemed to grow.... The height of the wall of water was at least thirty-six feet at the center.... The drowning and devastation of the city took just about ten minutes." A powerful, definitive book, and a tribute to the thousands who died in America's worst inland flood. --Mary Ellen Curtin

Review
John Leonard The New York Times We have no better social historian.

And the customer review by "BeachReader", voted by 193 or 202 people as helpful says...

McCullough relates the history of the South Fork property on which the dam and lake were located, including the purchase of this property by rich men from Pittsburgh, among them Carnegie, Frick, Mellon, and Horne. They formed the South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club, a mountain resort, and built a clubhouse for use by members. Sixteen members also built large "cottages" around the 350-acre lake that had been formed by the earthen dam which was first built between 1840 and 1850. When these men bought the property in 1879, the dam had been totally neglected so "repairs" were made. Unfortunately, no engineer had anything to do with these repairs, which consisted mostly of throwing junk, branches, rocks, and hay against the dam. During this time, the outlet pipes at the bottom of the dam were removed and sold as scrap. Other ingredients in this recipe for disaster were the pipes that were put in near the dam to prevent fish from leaving the lake. These would also, it was found later, allow debris to build up and cause water to spill over the dam more easily.

The inevitable occurred in 1889, on Memorial Day, when a huge storm caused the lake to rise above the dam. With no outlet pipes to lower the level of the water, the water poured over the top, at the center. The dam soon gave way, allowing the contents of the huge lake to rush 15 miles down the mountain, destroying everything in its path, including the town of Johnstown.

When McCullough describes this wall of water descending the mountain and the destruction that occurred, the picture he painted was beyond belief. The torrent of water brought with it livestock, houses, trains, tracks, machinery, barbed wire and everything else that was in its path.

In the face of such complete chaos and horror, level heads prevailed. The day after the flood, townspeople held a meeting at which it was decided that a "dictator" was needed. Arthur Moxham was subsequently chosen and he immediately set up several committees to take care of removing dead animals and wreckage, setting up morgues and temporary hospitals, deputizing a police force (which cut out tin stars from cans found in the debris), handling finances, and obtaining supplies.

At 4 PM this same day (Saturday), emergency supplies, 80 volunteers, and 30 police left Pittsburgh on a 20-car train after wagons had been sent out throughout the city to collect supplies for Johnstown.

The next day, burials started. One out of three bodies was never identified--over 600 unknowns.

During this time, more trains arrived--one 11-car train from Pittsburgh contained nothing but coffins and 50 undertakers; another from the governor of Ohio was filled with tents. There were 27,000 people in the valley who had absolutely nothing, and providing for their physical needs was of paramount importance. Contributions, not including goods, eventually totaled $3.7 million, with only about $70,000 donated by the rich industrialits who owned the resort.

The National Guard was called in to try and keep order since thousands of people had come to help, and also to gawk. On Wednesday, Clara Barton arrived with her newly formed American Red Cross and 50 doctors and nurses. She was 67 and a bundle of energy and organization. Within days, she had organized hospital tents, hotels with hot and cold running water, and kitchens. She rarely slept and never left for five months!

Over 2200 people died in the Johnstown Flood and no responsibility was ever assumed by the members of the South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club, and none of the lawsuits against the club was ever won in the courts.

This was an incredible account of a horrific event in our nation's history.


_________________
Sue Salisbury
Maui Hawaii


The following user would like to thank Sue Salisbury for this post:
Chris OConnor
Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:55 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Owner
Diamond Contributor 3

Joined: May 2002
Posts: 16400
Location: Florida
Thanks: 3632
Thanked: 1391 times in 1091 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
Sure, lindad_amato, I'll add the most popular books from the last poll to the new poll.



The following user would like to thank Chris OConnor for this post:
lindad_amato
Wed Feb 22, 2012 1:50 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 3
Location: East Coast
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
Hello! <is confused> Did ya guys pick a book for March? Twas hoping to join in this month.


_________________
The story - from Rumplestiltskin to War and Peace - is one of the basic tools invented by the human mind, for the purpose of gaining understanding. There have been great societies that did not use the wheel, but there have been no societies that did not tell stories. - -Ursula K. LeGuin


Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:32 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6113
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2532
Thanked: 2489 times in 1867 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our March & April Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
I like these ones and would read and discuss them.
Chris OConnor wrote:
The Atheist's Guide to Reality: Enjoying Life without Illusions
Alex Rosenberg (Author)

Book Description
Publication Date: October 3, 2011

Quote:
A book for nonbelievers who embrace the reality-driven life.
We can't avoid the persistent questions about the meaning of life-and the nature of reality. Philosopher Alex Rosenberg maintains that science is the only thing that can really answer them—all of them. His bracing and ultimately upbeat book takes physics seriously as the complete description of reality and accepts all its consequences. He shows how physics makes Darwinian natural selection the only way life can emerge, and how that deprives nature of purpose, and human action of meaning, while it exposes conscious illusions such as free will and the self. The science that makes us nonbelievers provides the insight into the real difference between right and wrong, the nature of the mind, even the direction of human history. The Atheist's Guide to Reality draws powerful implications for the ethical and political issues that roil contemporary life. The result is nice nihilism, a surprisingly sanguine perspective atheists can happily embrace.

Chris OConnor wrote:
Here is a suggestion that would definitely get us talking and probably debating.

The World America Made

Book Description

What would the world look like if America were to reduce its role as a global leader in order to focus all its energies on solving its problems at home? And is America really in decline? Robert Kagan, New York Times best-selling author and one of the country’s most influential strategic thinkers, paints a vivid, alarming picture of what the world might look like if the United States were truly to let its influence wane.

Although Kagan asserts that much of the current pessimism is misplaced, he warns that if America were indeed to commit “preemptive superpower suicide,” the world would see the return of war among rising nations as they jostle for power; the retreat of democracy around the world as Vladimir Putin’s Russia and authoritarian China acquire more clout; and the weakening of the global free-market economy, which the United States created and has supported for more than sixty years. We’ve seen this before—in the breakdown of the Roman Empire and the collapse of the European order in World War I.

Potent, incisive, and engaging, The World America Made is a reminder that the American world order is worth preserving, and America dare not decline.

About the Author
Robert Kagan is senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a columnist for The Washington Post. He is also the author of The Return of History and the End of Dreams, Dangerous Nation, Of Paradise and Power, and A Twilight Struggle. Kagan served in the U.S. State Department from 1984 to 1988. He lives in Virginia with his wife and two children.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Thu Feb 23, 2012 11:35 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Doctorate


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 508
Thanks: 48
Thanked: 123 times in 102 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
Well I really enjoyed Barbara Rogoff's - The Cultural Nature of Human Development - not sure if its highbrow enough for here - cos I also liked the pictures
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cultural-Nature ... 404&sr=1-1
Product Description
The Cultural Nature of Human Development presents an account of human development that looks at both the differences and similarities among cultures. Beyond demonstrating that 'culture matters', Rogoff focuses on how culture matters in human development - what patterns help make sense of the cultural aspects of human development? Rogoff integrates research and theory from several disciplines, including cross-cultural psychology, sociocultural research, linguistic and psychological anthropology, and history. The volume examines multiple aspects of development, including childrearing, gender differences, interdependence and autonomy, developmental transitions, maternal attachment, parental discipline, and cognition and culture.


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


The following user would like to thank heledd for this post:
Alizerin
Thu Feb 23, 2012 2:51 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 3
Location: East Coast
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Suggestions needed for our APRIL & MAY Non-Fiction Book Discussion!
I like the idea of the one above based on human nature. But I'm looking forward to reading along with any one of them. I need a structured avenue to busy my mind :)


_________________
The story - from Rumplestiltskin to War and Peace - is one of the basic tools invented by the human mind, for the purpose of gaining understanding. There have been great societies that did not use the wheel, but there have been no societies that did not tell stories. - -Ursula K. LeGuin


Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:48 pm
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 23 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Community Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Book Discussion Leaders

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
Banned Books
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
Promote your FICTION book
Promote your NON-FICTION book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2021. All rights reserved.

Display Pagerank