Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat May 15, 2021 4:08 am





Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 33 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Suggestions for our May & June 2008 Non-Fiction book 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2955
Location: Randolph Center, VT
Thanks: 482
Thanked: 399 times in 303 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post The Chalice & The Blade
I'd like to recommend almost any book by Riane Eisler. A good beginning point might be The Chalice & The Blade.

http://www.amazon.com/Chalice-Blade-Our ... 819&sr=8-1


Quote:
Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com
Some books are like revelations, they open the spirit to unimaginable possibilities. The Chalice and the Blade is one of those magnificent key books that can transform us and...initiate fundamental changes in the world. With the most passionate eloquence, Riane Eisler proves that the dream of peace is not an impossible utopia. -- Isabelle Allende, author of The House of the Spirits --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

I also like the idea of the book DWill recommended, Embracing your inner fish - I think that was it.



Fri Apr 04, 2008 8:41 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2955
Location: Randolph Center, VT
Thanks: 482
Thanked: 399 times in 303 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post please excuse my public learning
Okay, I figured out how to use the quote box, but not exactly. Somehow my last thought ended up inside the quote box. On top of that, I incorrectly sited the title. Goes to show you my short term memory does not exist!



Fri Apr 04, 2008 8:46 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 35 times in 35 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
Aren't you being a little hard on yourself? ;-)

I certainly didn't achieve this much in my first few postings.


_________________
Ophelia.


Fri Apr 04, 2008 9:48 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6872
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2215
Thanked: 2416 times in 1822 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
I could also support either of the books recommended by JulianTheApostate. The one on pharmacology is more specialized, perhaps, than the usual type of selection, but I happen to be interested in that topic and somewhat connected with it professionally.

The ways of thinking that we have, but which are unknown to us, is always a fascinating topic (this would be the Airely book).
Will



Sat Apr 05, 2008 8:31 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2955
Location: Randolph Center, VT
Thanks: 482
Thanked: 399 times in 303 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post 
I could get behind reading The Cult of Pharmacology. I think it would generate lots of discussion. I actually think we have a great list going. I'd be happy to read just about any of them.



Sat Apr 05, 2008 11:00 am
Profile Email


Post 
Hi Lisamarie -

I've always been a fan of Rebecca West and have read many of her writings over the years. I've never heard of this one - The Gray and the Falcon (something like that) - but would enjoy reading it.

In Cold Blood is always current simply because it is a wonderfully written book.

However, my non-fiction book for this month will be Home, by the lovely Julie Andrews. Good reviews and it will sell well - probably far too popular for this crowd.



Sat Apr 05, 2008 1:41 pm
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post 
I would love to read "Neither Wolf nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder" by Kent Nerburn. I have already read this book unlike almost everyone I know and have it so earmarked it's a mess! It was very spiritually grounding for me and has changed the way I see so many things. I'd love to hear how others feel about it.

Attaching the Review:
From Booklist
Readers looking for another red-man-departs-wise-words-to-white-man-to-lessen-white- man's-guilt will be disappointed by the tone and content of this work. Realists wanting a truthful, fiery, and, ultimately, cleansing dialogue between Indian and white will definitely want it. Nerburn reluctantly agrees to a meeting with Dan, a Lakota elder who asks him to construct a book from a motley collection of notes, diatribes, and political and social commentaries written over seven decades and kept in an old shoe box. Void of the hypocrisy rampant in many books that have whites adopting the ways of "the great spirit," Nerburn exposes the real truth, which whites are unwilling to face: that in "the hunger to own a piece of the earth, we had destroyed the dreams and families of an entire race." Joined by a dog named Fatback, Dan gives Nerburn the ride of his life as they cross the vast Midwest in Dan's Buick. Along the way, Dan alternates between rage and melancholy, and Nerburn between shame and confusion. Nerburn unintentionally touches nerve after nerve and elicits an almost unbearable flood of anguish and despair. The truth revealed in this book will be difficult for most whites to face, but it is painfully necessary if healing is ever to begin. Kevin Roddy --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.



Sat Apr 05, 2008 3:28 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 35 times in 35 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
jcd,

Neither Wolf Nor Dog.
This looks interesting.


http://www.amazon.com/Neither-Wolf-nor-Dog-Forgotten/dp/1577312333/ref=pd_sim_b_title_4


_________________
Ophelia.


Sat Apr 05, 2008 3:54 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Upper Echelon 3rd Class

BookTalk.org Moderator
Book Discussion Leader
Silver Contributor

Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 2368
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Thanks: 128
Thanked: 970 times in 746 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Current events
I suggest Marching Toward Hell - America and Islam After Iraq by Michael Scheuer. The author headed the CIA's Osama bin Laden unit and so knows more about him that just about anyone...

http://www.amazon.com/Marching-Toward-H ... 730&sr=8-2

If that's too much, I second DWill's suggestion for Your Inner Fish: A Journey Into the 3.5 Billion-Year History of the Human Body, by Neil Shubin. I saw an interview with the author and it sounded quite interesting.

This book looks similar to the above, but doesn't go so far back into our ancestry. ;-) Our Inner Ape - A Leading Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are by Frans De Wall.

http://www.amazon.com/Our-Inner-Ape-Fra ... 169&sr=1-1



Sat Apr 05, 2008 5:53 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Upper Echelon 3rd Class

BookTalk.org Moderator
Book Discussion Leader
Silver Contributor

Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 2368
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Thanks: 128
Thanked: 970 times in 746 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
Have we ever done a biography? How about Benjamin Franklin, An American Life by Walter Isaacson. Hey, out of 191 Amazon reviews, 161 are 4 or 5 star...

http://www.amazon.com/Benjamin-Franklin ... 155&sr=1-1



Sat Apr 05, 2008 7:21 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Masters


Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 450
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
Thanks: 5
Thanked: 43 times in 34 posts
Gender: None specified

Post 
lawrenceindestin wrote:
I propose Thomas Sowell's The Vision of the Anointed...

There's no way I'd read a book of Sowell's. Here's the Amazon review of that book:
Quote:
In this broadside against the received wisdom of America's elite liberal intelligentsia, noted conservative Sowell, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, offers some strenuous arguments as well as fuzzy generalizations. Thus, his attacks on the war on poverty, sex education and criminal justice policies forged in the 1960s counter some slippery rhetoric by their defenders, yet his suggestion that these policies exacerbated things is questionable. Sowell deconstructs how statistics can be distorted to prove assumptions (that lack of prenatal care is the cause of black infant mortality) and gleefully skewers "Teflon prophets" such as John Kenneth Galbraith (who said that big companies are immune from the market) and Paul Ehrlich (who said starvation loomed). While "the anointed" favor explanations that exempt individuals from personal responsibility and seek painless solutions, those with the "tragic vision" see policies as trade-offs. Sowell scores his targets for disdaining their opponents, but this book also invokes caricature-these days, many of "the anointed" are less unreconstructed than he assumes. Conservative Book Club and Laissez-Faire Book Club selections.


Regarding The Chalice and the Blade. which Saffron recommended, my understanding is that most historians disagree with the belief in past matriarchal societies.

Anyway, thanks for making those suggestions. Don't let my objections discourage you from suggesting other books in the future



Sun Apr 06, 2008 2:07 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2
Location: IND/NYC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Book Talk for May/June
Hello Everyone,

This is author Michael Corbin. I think that my illustrated art book called, "The Art of Everyday Joe: A Collector's Journal," would make a
fantastic book for discussion. I'm an art collector and I write books about art and life. My books are NOT academic. They're fun, insightful, witty and will make you see contemporary art in a whole new light. You'll want to become an art collector yourself! I'm not kidding. Art is for the "Everyday Joe." That's what my books are all about.

Check it out my website at ...
www.artmaestrogallery.com

Thanks!
Mike



Sun Apr 06, 2008 3:19 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 35 times in 35 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
Quote:
Our Inner Ape - A Leading Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are by Frans De Wall.

http://www.amazon.com/Our-Inner-Ape-Fra ... /ref=pd_bb s_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1207436169&sr=1-1


This theme, suggested by Landroid, interests me a lot.

I am actually reading two books by French ethologist and psychiatrist Boris Cyrulnik, it'd rewarding to study animals to compare them with humans, and hopefully we'll know ourselves better after reading "Our inner Ape".


_________________
Ophelia.


Sun Apr 06, 2008 3:48 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2955
Location: Randolph Center, VT
Thanks: 482
Thanked: 399 times in 303 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post 
JulianTheApostate wrote:

Quote:
Regarding The Chalice and the Blade. which Saffron recommended, my understanding is that most historians disagree with the belief in past matriarchal societies



Riane Eisler is not making an argument for the existence of past matriarchal societies. She is the first to say they never existed. However, most scholars do agree that most if not all cultures prior to the onset of patriarchy, worshiped the Goddess. She is make a case for a new frame work to describe cultures, rather than matriarchy and patriarchy. Her words are dominator and partnership. She believes this frame work is more useful in understanding a cultures distribution of power, division of labor, sex, etc. Her work is based on sound archaeological evidence.



Sun Apr 06, 2008 7:43 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2955
Location: Randolph Center, VT
Thanks: 482
Thanked: 399 times in 303 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post 
Ophelia wrote:

Quote:
This theme, suggested by Landroid, interests me a lot.

I am actually reading two books by French ethologist and psychiatrist Boris Cyrulnik, it'd rewarding to study animals to compare them with humans, and hopefully we'll know ourselves better after reading "Our inner Ape".


I love this idea!



Sun Apr 06, 2008 7:48 pm
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 33 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Community Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Book Discussion Leaders

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
Banned Books
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
Promote your FICTION book
Promote your NON-FICTION book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2021. All rights reserved.

Display Pagerank