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The Hot 100 
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Post Re: The Hot 100
I liked the Lake of Innisfree very much. I have a personal fantasy about such a place. Even though I live a relatively quiet and strife free life, still the isolation, quietude and especially ". . . small cabin . . . of clay and wattles made" is so appealing.

I agree with Penelope that the two (although not meant to be compared) seem jarring in the same post.

Froglipz, "Papa's waltz" while to me seems to have sort of bizarre frenetic appeal, to my husband just seem dismal. Maybe because he had a father who drank. I guess we can't divorce who we are. . . not only intellectually and emotionally but our experiences; from our response to artistic expression.



Mon Feb 14, 2011 11:13 am
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Post Re: The Hot 100
DWill wrote:
86. "The Lake Isle of Innisfree," by W. B. Yeats.


I wish I could remember or find the explanation I heard or read a few years ago, of the unique way Yeats read his poetry aloud. It is a sing song kind of chant. Does this ring any bells for anyone out there? DWill?
You can hear for yourself. Here is Yeats reading The Lake Isle of Innisfree.
http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15529

It is hard to give it 3 dings, but 2 is not quite enough.



Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:16 pm
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One more post ought to do it.

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Post Re: The Hot 100
Quote:
Saffron wrote:

It is hard to give it 3 dings, but 2 is not quite enough.


Give it 2 and seven eighths.....because this is one of the loveliest lines:

Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee;
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.


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Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:24 pm
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Post Re: The Hot 100
Penelope wrote:
Quote:
Saffron wrote:

It is hard to give it 3 dings, but 2 is not quite enough.


Give it 2 and seven eighths.....because this is one of the loveliest lines:

Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee;
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

Bingo! These are my favorite lines and definately worth the 2+ dings.



Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:39 pm
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Post Re: The Hot 100
Saffron wrote:
DWill wrote:
86. "The Lake Isle of Innisfree," by W. B. Yeats.


I wish I could remember or find the explanation I heard or read a few years ago, of the unique way Yeats read his poetry aloud. It is a sing song kind of chant. Does this ring any bells for anyone out there? DWill?
You can hear for yourself. Here is Yeats reading The Lake Isle of Innisfree.
http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15529

It is hard to give it 3 dings, but 2 is not quite enough.

I don't want to sound disrespectful, but was W. B. on his deathbed when he read that? That gives a new meaning to "gravelly voice"!



Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:50 pm
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Post Re: The Hot 100
DWill wrote:
Saffron wrote:
DWill wrote:
86. "The Lake Isle of Innisfree," by W. B. Yeats.


I wish I could remember or find the explanation I heard or read a few years ago, of the unique way Yeats read his poetry aloud. It is a sing song kind of chant. Does this ring any bells for anyone out there? DWill?
You can hear for yourself. Here is Yeats reading The Lake Isle of Innisfree.
http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15529

It is hard to give it 3 dings, but 2 is not quite enough.

I don't want to sound disrespectful, but was W. B. on his deathbed when he read that? That gives a new meaning to "gravelly voice"!


He was near the end of his life. There is an interesting history to this recording. I will try hard to remember what I know or more like refind somewhere on the web. It is the rythym of his voice while reading that I remember hearing was intentional. In fact, while looking for something to back me up, I did find a passage from the following book that describes Yeats instructing some one on how to read his poetry for a BBC production.

The last minstrels: Yeats and the revival of the bardic arts By Ronald Schuchard

I just found what I wss looking for, but first here is a link to a complete recording of Yeats reading the poem with his introduction.
http://www.poetryarchive.org/poetryarch ... oemId=1689
Yeats recorded this for the BBC in 1932, about 7 years before he died.

I fist came across this recording in a CD/book collection of poets reading their own work. In Their Own Words: A Century of Recorded Poetry.



Mon Feb 14, 2011 3:21 pm
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Post Re: The Hot 100
84. "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. We haven't been in the habit of posting long poems, and this one takes up 23 pages of Harmon's anthology. But does anyone want to read it? I would kind of like to read it again. This was the centerpiece of Wordsworth's and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads of 1798. It's not difficult. There was an 1887 edition illustrated with Gustav Dore prints that is a treat to read. You can see the pictures at http://www.artsycraftsy.com/dore_mariner.html. Maybe we'll just mull it over and have another poem on Wednesday if nobody has a chance to read about the old sailor.



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Post Re: The Hot 100
DWill wrote:
84. "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. We haven't been in the habit of posting long poems, and this one takes up 23 pages of Harmon's anthology. But does anyone want to read it? I would kind of like to read it again. This was the centerpiece of Wordsworth's and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads of 1798. It's not difficult. There was an 1887 edition illustrated with Gustav Dore prints that is a treat to read. You can see the pictures at http://www.artsycraftsy.com/dore_mariner.html. Maybe we'll just mull it over and have another poem on Wednesday if nobody has a chance to read about the old sailor.

Maybe you could, or anyone for that matter, could post choice morsels.



Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:25 pm
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Post Re: The Hot 100
There is a "squashed" version on the 'net, but I didn't find it helpful. This poem reads faster than 23 pages of prose would, so it's really not that imposing. I find that the simple ballad meter and rhyme gets bit wearing, though.



Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:59 pm
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Post Re: The Hot 100
Whew! I did it, the Ancient Mariner's tale...and my favorite lines, of course the sweet finish:
Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.

He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.

And the whole thing needs a grand 'Amen!' But not being much for fantasy I can't say it was a favorite. The Lake of Innisfree was enchanting, more my speed (and length!)...


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Mon Feb 14, 2011 11:46 pm
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Post Re: The Hot 100
The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere
This long poem by Coleridge is one of the greats. I’ve read it again now, available at http://www.online-literature.com/coleridge/646/ and would like to highlight some themes. It tells the story of how a ‘greybeard loon’ stops a wedding guest to tell him of his travels to the southern ocean. Please now, read the poem yourself, because I will summarise it.
The mariner kills an albatross and brings a foul curse upon the ship. This is the source of the famous image of an albatross hanging about the neck of a cursed person. He alone of all the crew, like Ulysses, returns to his homeland, after adventures with death and beauty, finding redemption in atonement to nature. What appeals to me is that the poem, written in 1797, presents the imagination of an Englishman inspired by Captain James Cook, who claimed Australia for Britain. The colonial adventurers and explorers in the age of discovery symbolised man’s imperial conquest of nature, but the albatross symbolises the mysterious danger of the friendly unknown, able to wreak havoc when crossed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rime_o ... Background says Cook’s astronomer was Coleridge’s tutor, hence the vivid and realistic imagery.
Now to the text

Quote:
“`By thy long grey beard and glittering eye, Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?”

Reminds me of Merlin, or Gandalf. Coleridge had an eye for magic, and the glittering eye tells of unknown secrets.

Quote:
"There was a ship," quoth he. `Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!' Eftsoons his hand dropped he. He holds him with his glittering eye - The Wedding-Guest stood still, And listens like a three years' child: The Mariner hath his will.

Coleridge is drawing us into the spell of the lunatic, perhaps against our better judgment.

Quote:
The sun came up upon the left, Out of the sea came he! And he shone bright, and on the right Went down into the sea. Higher and higher every day, Till over the mast at noon -".

What this means is that the journey starts in the northern hemisphere, where the sun rises on the left, and heads south to the tropics. Later, when the sun rises on the right, we are in the southern hemisphere. This sense of planetary dimension was quite new in Coleridge’s day, Cook being the first to have reached the Southern Ocean. Most people now are still disoriented by the idea that in the other hemisphere the sun appears to travel in the opposite direction.

Quote:
The ship drove fast, loud roared the blast, And southward aye we fled. And now there came both mist and snow, And it grew wondrous cold: And ice, mast-high, came floating by, As green as emerald.

Imagine Coleridge at the knee of Cook’s astronomer, hearing strange tales of emerald icebergs. This derring-do reminds of the discovery of strange animals and cultures from the far flung reaches of the globe.

Quote:
At length did cross an Albatross, Thorough the fog it came; As it had been a Christian soul, We hailed it in God's name.

An animal with soul, rather heretical, but expressive of the wonder of exploration.

Quote:
In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud, It perched for vespers nine;

The bird joins the ship for nine days
Quote:
"With my crossbow I shot the Albatross."

But the Mariner kills it.

Quote:
"The sun now rose upon the right: Out of the sea came he,

In the southern hemisphere
Quote:
And I had done a hellish thing, And it would work 'em woe: For all averred, I had killed the bird That made the breeze to blow.

A magical suggestion, the mystery of nature wreaks its vengeance on the arrogant
Quote:
Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean. Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink..

Such famous lines. It reminds that you can drink sea water a hundred miles off the coast of the Amazon River, such is its mighty size carrying one third of the world’s river flow.
Quote:
Instead of the cross, the Albatross About my neck was hung."

The famous image
Quote:
How fast she nears and nears! Are those her sails that glance in the sun, Like restless gossameres? Are those her ribs through which the sun Did peer, as through a grate? And is that Woman all her crew? Is that a Death? and are there two? Is Death that Woman's mate?

The ghost ship
Quote:
Four times fifty living men, (And I heard nor sigh nor groan) With heavy thump, a lifeless lump, They dropped down one by one. The souls did from their bodies fly, - They fled to bliss or woe! And every soul it passed me by, Like the whizz of my crossbow!"

His shipmates all die.
Quote:
I fear thee and thy glittering eye, And thy skinny hand, so brown.' - "Fear not, fear not, thou Wedding-Guest! This body dropped not down.

Fearing the mariner is a ghost, the wedding guest is assured the bard is among the living.
Quote:
Beyond the shadow of the ship I watched the water-snakes: ... O happy living things! no tongue Their beauty might declare: A spring of love gushed from my heart, And I blessed them unaware: Sure my kind saint took pity on me, And I blessed them unaware. The selfsame moment I could pray; And from my neck so free The Albatross fell off, and sank
Like lead into the sea."

Blessing the snakes, atoning to nature, lifts the curse.

Quote:
The loud wind never reached the ship, Yet now the ship moved on!


The empty vessel leaves the doldrums with its lone loon aboard among the corpses.
Quote:
The dead men gave a groan. They groaned, they stirred, they all uprose, Nor spake, nor moved their eyes; It had been strange, even in a dream, To have seen those dead men rise. The helmsman steered, the ship moved on; Yet never a breeze up blew; The mariners all 'gan work the ropes, Where they were wont to do; They raised their limbs like lifeless tools - We were a ghastly crew.

Zombie ship

Quote:
still the sails made on A pleasant noise till noon, A noise like of a hidden brook In the leafy month of June, That to the sleeping woods all night Singeth a quiet tune.

Lovely

Quote:
Under the keel nine fathom deep, From the land of mist and snow, The spirit slid: and it was he That made the ship to go.

The cursed albatross spirit remains with him as the spectral motive power.
Quote:
The spirit who bideth by himself In the land of mist and snow, He loved the bird that loved the man Who shot him with his bow.'

This image is of Gaia, earth goddess and lover of nature, with power of revenge on those who breach her trust.

Quote:
Oh! dream of joy! is this indeed The lighthouse top I see? Is this the hill? is this the kirk?
Is this mine own country?

Ulysses reaches Ithaca
Quote:
straight a sound was heard. Under the water it rumbled on, Still louder and more dread: It reached the ship, it split the bay; The ship went down like lead. Stunned by that loud and dreadful sound, Which sky and ocean smote, Like one that hath been seven days drowned My body lay afloat; But swift as dreams, myself I found Within the Pilot's boat.

The ship sinks and the mariner is rescued.
Quote:
Farewell, farewell! but this I tell To thee, thou Wedding-Guest! He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all."

The moral of the story is to love nature.



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Post Re: The Hot 100
Tremendous, Robert, many thanks. He tells us to love nature because, since God loves all creatures whom he made, so should we. He mingles pantheism with his unorthodox Christianity, and it works. Coleridge's role in the collaboration with Wordsworth was to mine supernatural subjects in order to show the common emotions of humans, while Wordsworth's was to show that the deepest poetry lay in common life and speech.

By the way, for all heavy metal fans, Iron Maiden did a 10-minute song based on "The Rime."



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Post Re: The Hot 100
DWill wrote:
Iron Maiden did a 10-minute song based on "The Rime."

Song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7zk4as9kzA&NR=1
Lyrics: http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/ ... d10027a2b3



Last edited by Robert Tulip on Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:41 am, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:37 am
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Post Re: The Hot 100
I am so inspired by the discussion of The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere, that I feel compelled to read it start to finish. What better way can there be to spend a day home sick from work, than reading in bed.



Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:54 am
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One more post ought to do it.

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Post Re: The Hot 100
Saffron: I do hope you are feeling better by now. :kiss:

I have read the Ancient Mariner this evening - and then I read Robert's Study Guide.

I don't think I'd pass an exam if this were the syllabus but I think I appreciate it more than I did.

Thanks Robert.

It reminds me of some of my more eccentric clients at the shop:

Next time one of them comes in and says they want a book about a boat trip - they don't know the title or the author - but they tell me the whole story and then say it had a blue dustwrapper.....do I think we have a copy, I will reply,

`Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!' :lol:


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