• In total there is 1 user online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest (based on users active over the past 60 minutes)
    Most users ever online was 906 on Thu Jul 07, 2022 7:52 pm

Meditations: Notebooks 5 - 8

#182: May - Jul. 2022
Post Reply
User avatar
Chris OConnor

1A - OWNER
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame
Posts: 16792
Joined: Sun May 05, 2002 2:43 pm
20
Location: Florida
Has thanked: 3362 times
Been thanked: 1270 times
Gender:
Contact:
United States of America

Meditations: Notebooks 5 - 8

Meditations
Notebooks 5 - 8


Please use this thread to discuss the above referenced notebooks of Meditations by Marcus Aurelius.
User avatar
LevV

1F - BRONZE CONTRIBUTOR
Sophomore
Posts: 261
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 8:45 pm
12
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Has thanked: 110 times
Been thanked: 193 times
Canada

Re: Meditations: Notebooks 5 - 8

I see more than ever how brief comments and summaries can never do justice to the words and tone as written by Marcus Aurelius – with some quality differences in the various translations. There is a reason why thousands have been reading “Meditations” for hundreds of years. But, the power in these reflections only becomes apparent when reading and rereading his words as they flowed from his pen.

Book 5 is probably my favorite.
“When you have trouble getting up, say to yourself: I awake to do the work of a man; why then should I grieve for having to do the things for which I was sent into the world? Was I born to remain warmly in bed under my covers? But it is so pleasant. Were you not born for pleasure, then? Was it not for action, for work?”
“On the occasion of every act ask yourself . . . Will I regret it?”
“Why were you born? For pleasure? See if that answer will stand up to questioning.”

A person’s most important work is “being human,” experiencing things and practicing virtues in response. Even when you encounter obstacles, as in dealing with difficult people, you can adapt to them, work around them, and turn obstacles into opportunities to make you a better person.

In Book 6 Marcus reflects on Nature as inhabited by the divine logos. It governs everything and keeps everything in harmony. Life may seem random, but that’s no cause for anxiety. No matter what, everything follows the law of the logos, and in the meantime, one’s job remains the same: have a goal and live in harmony with nature as one pursues that goal.

In Book 7 he comments on the individual as part of a larger whole and the importance of getting along well with others. Marcus stresses that we’re all human, we’ll soon die, and we can afford to show each other compassion. In any case, another person’s actions can’t stop you from practicing virtues. Your well-being is in your own hands.

In Book 8 Marcus advises to stay humble, you are still working on a philosophical life. Don’t complain or blame others. Just focus on building your own life out of the materials you’ve been given, one action at a time, and keeping your attention fixed on the present. Posthumous fame is a pointless goal.
User avatar
Robert Tulip

3B - MOD & BOOK & SILVER
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame
Posts: 6388
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 9:16 pm
17
Location: Canberra
Has thanked: 2618 times
Been thanked: 2584 times
Contact:
Australia

Re: Meditations: Notebooks 5 - 8

Here is a beautiful and profound quote from Book Seven
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Medi ... nus/Book_7
9. All things are woven together and the common bond is sacred, and scarcely one thing is foreign to another, for they have been arranged together in their places and together make the same ordered Universe. For there is one Universe out of all, one God through all, one substance and one law, one common Reason of all intelligent creatures and one truth.
User avatar
Robert Tulip

3B - MOD & BOOK & SILVER
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame
Posts: 6388
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 9:16 pm
17
Location: Canberra
Has thanked: 2618 times
Been thanked: 2584 times
Contact:
Australia

Re: Meditations: Notebooks 5 - 8

The quote above from Marcus Aurelius provides an important logical foundation for Stoic philosophy in the principle that we have one self-consistent universe. This has a number of implications.

1. We cannot create our own reality that conflicts with the actual reality of the universe.
2. A statement of fact cannot be true and false.
3. Whenever two people disagree about matters of fact, one is right and the other is wrong.
4. Sound ethical principles cohere with factual evidence.
5. The material connection of all things operates through natural causality.
6. The same scientific laws operate consistently throughout the universe.
7. The "one God through all" is not the personal intentional being of popular mythology.
Post Reply