Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sun Nov 29, 2020 9:37 pm





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 269 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18  Next
Trump Watch 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I Should Be Bronzed


Joined: May 2011
Posts: 1663
Thanks: 1902
Thanked: 859 times in 690 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Trump Watch
Umair Haque wrote:
they are going to have to come face to face with what authoritarianism really is: an indifference to any kind of civilised values of dignity, care, concern, humanity. That is what they risk becoming in their paralysis.

I thought this was an insightful and rousing discussion, but I also want to take issue with some parts of it. Starting with the fact that the principle opposed to those civilised values is much more complex than simply authoritarianism as if that is chosen for its own sake. No one I know gives away all that he or she has, just because of caring and concern. There are opposing considerations of prudence, management and simple selfish preoccupation. And if you think about it, fascism is an institutional version of these. The trains run on time. People are expected to conform and uphold the solidarity of the group vs other groups. Some normative version of social values is promoted for all to accept. The venerable film of the classroom experiment in fascism "The Wave" demonstrated how it holds the promise of effectiveness. The students did their homework, by God.
Quote:
It recently emerged that the Postal Service had a plan to send facemasks to every American. That is precisely the kind of thing that would and should have happened in a sane and rational country. And it was the Trump Administration that stopped this plan dead in its tracks.

Now, the Post Office’s plan was to send five reusable facemasks to Americans. Doesn’t sound like a lot. But it could have been built on, as emergent plans in emergencies often are. America could have found itself in a situation like this: the Postal Service sent Americans facemasks every week, and the government mandating wearing them, in any public place.
That alone, epidemiologists suggest, would have massively reduced the incidence of Covid. Dropping deaths, probably, from the 200,000 they’re at to half that — and that’s in a conservative scenario.
I have not heard of this. My understanding was that facemasks were in short supply - too short to provide them to all. Whenever it was that Trump failed to distribute them, they would have been available in stores by then, and not in shortage at the hospitals. So we are really talking about the failure to mandate.

Quote:
Remember, pandemics spread exponentially. That is why if you nip them in the bud, before exponential growth accelerates — that is your best chance of stopping them. It is why some nations have been spectacularly successful — South Korea, Vietnam, New Zealand — and some, like America, have had the world’s worst outcomes.
Yes, understanding science is critical to making democracy function effectively. I tried to get a group of high schoolers to understand the difference between exponential and linear growth, but the curriculum made us move on before the point could sink in for most. This is, of course, a sin and a crime. If I had known the pandemic was coming I would have slowed down and done extra processing despite the curriculum.

Fascism's disdain for science is well known. But this is a good time to stop and think what is going on. People's need for singular authority, concentrated into purest form as support for some megalomaniac who can only desire more power, shoves aside whatever other priorities might appear to conflict. It happens in religion, it happens in politics. When reason itself takes a back seat to the apparent priorities of the group, then the train is going to derail. QAnon Nation is but a step away.

Quote:
To this day, America has no Covid policy or strategy. That is why the death toll is simply skyrocketing every single day, reaching astonishing numbers. It took just 10 days for America to go from 190,000 deaths to 200,000 — deaths have stabilised at about 1,000 per day. 1,000 people a day are needlessly dying from coronavirus in America. Really think about how many people that is.
So what we know now is that there wasn’t a national-level strategy for Coronavirus for a reason: not because Trump was incompetent, stupid, misinformed, or foolish. But for a reason that almost impossible to fully process, even if you say you believe it. Because Trump knew — but didn’t care.
I think this is oversimplified. Trump's role was certainly catastrophic. But a big reason why America has no Covid strategy is that it is a big nation with a lot of centrifugal forces pulling people in different directions, so that federalist decentralization has become built in to the ideologies and power structures. And it might be worth noting that this system is exactly the one imposed by the US on West Germany after WWII as a protection against fascism.
The states have strategies. There are public health officials and tripwires for various levels of openings and closings. Granted it is far more decentralized than would be optimal for good policy, but as we speak, no state has failed to fail, so to speak. Just as Europe's policies might have been more effective if they were all centralized, coordinated and more uniform, so the US failure to coordinate has weaknesses but is also natural and not so obviously at great fault.

Quote:
The only kinds of societies in which such awful failings are tolerated are authoritarian states, really. And in that sense, America is a pre-authoritarian state. Americans seem to have shrugged and given up on all this. They don’t seem to understand — or even care to understand — the unbelievable scale and depth of Trump’s failure on Covid.
The reasons for that are both complex and straightforward. America is still a racist and classist country, and Covid hit the poor and minorities hardest. America is also the home of the Darwinian logic of self-reliance — the strong should survive, and the weak perish, and so Americans have had a cultural tendency not to care about Covid the way that nearly every other country on earth has.
Here is, I think, the heart of Haque's argument and the most important issue to think through. Haque conspicuously left out the group most heavily afflicted by Covid and the one that is most often mentioned by people who are arguing that Covid is not that terrible, namely the old. Yes, America is still invested in the logic of self-reliance, but that is not all about racism and the expendability of the working class. It is also about, well, self-reliance. If the old cannot keep up, then too bad. If the poor cannot afford quality health care, then let them get master's degrees, like they are supposed to.

This is not, fundamentally, about authoritarianism. But it is about failure to exercise care for others. America does not just have a history of using the poor for the benefit of the rich, it also has a history of vast and unprecedented opportunity. Land for anyone, to put it in the simplest possible terms. We have recently been asked to consider the collateral damage on Native Americans and African-Americans, and that is nothing to sneeze at. It has infected our ability to look with objectivity on straightforward policy choices that other countries have no trouble with. But at the core, Americans are heavily invested in the myth that anyone can make it with determination and grit. We really have to work on accommodating the competing principles that often get shoved aside by this myth, but it is also a good baby to keep as we throw out the bathwater.

Quote:
Plenty of leaders have gotten away with terrible things. Stalin, Mao, Saddam — the list is endless. But thanks to its misplaced feeling of exceptionalism, Americans think of themselves as above such nations. They look down their noses at such countries. But the truth is they have become one. A place where an authoritarian’s negligence results in mass death — and terrorized, traumatized, timid, fearful people cannot hold him accountable for it, and so he simply gets away with it. Just like Russians, Chinese, Iraqis, Americans cannot really fully process the scale of the horror — a kind of denial and wilful ignorance kicks in, even among the good people. They become a silent majority this way — because who can really sit down and think the thought: “hundred of thousands of people died just because of one man’s maliciousness?” It’s too terrible to bear.
And yet it must be borne, if a nation is to rouse itself from the slumber of apathy. In this way, Americans have become arrogant people. They think they could never become a place where mass death happened, just because an authoritarian led them to it — that only happened in those other dirty, poor countries. But unfortunately, they are now a country like that. Two hundred thousand Americans are dead. A thousand die a day. That’s another hundred thousand by the end of the year. All because — we now know — of Donald Trump’s malicious indifference. No ground should be given on this score. Democracy dies with the tolerance and silent acceptance of abuses of power this grave, this vast, this unbelievable.
One man's slumber of apathy is another man's focus on the things they can realistically manage. I agree with Haque's conclusion that we screwed up royally on Covid. But I believe it because of the facts that we got wrong, and the elevation of symbolism above pragmatism. Not because the alternative principle of caring for others must be elevated to determinative status.

I am all for caring - I think the disdain for the lives of the old was and is barbaric. I think it is shocking, and more than a little fascist, how the right wing has blithely ignored the lives of their fellow citizens on the excuse that "it mainly kills old people." But I am also deeply suspicious of ideologies that say we must bear any burden for the alleviation of anyone's suffering. My priority would be on preventing either principle - individual liberty vs. social support - from dictating policy in disregard for the facts.



The following user would like to thank Harry Marks for this post:
DWill
Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:48 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I Should Be Bronzed


Joined: May 2011
Posts: 1663
Thanks: 1902
Thanked: 859 times in 690 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Trump Watch
Trump's Administration, and the evil Barr, have done another good thing, worth saluting.

By going after Google for exclusive contracts and other means of leveraging its search dominance to gain more dominance, the Administration has put some teeth back into anti-trust enforcement, and restored some balance to the power that comes from network advantages. Let Facebook look to its policies as well. I never thought I would be glad for anything WalMart did, but their development of on-line shopping is almost the only realistic check on Amazon's growing power in retail.



Tue Oct 20, 2020 9:24 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I Should Be Bronzed


Joined: May 2011
Posts: 1663
Thanks: 1902
Thanked: 859 times in 690 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Trump Watch
Jinx.

Like most superstition, it's a variety of acausal significance, as Jung would have it. Meaning nobody in their right mind believes that a simple prediction, especially if based on the polls, could cause a karmic backlash that causes the election to tilt differently than it would have. But the hint of a possible mysterious source of influence is a warning to our unreason, a warning against arrogance. Against thinking that, because you know something about how things work, you can go on with your privilege and ignore those who might be run over by the steamroller you think you are riding.

So it's worth thinking a little in advance about who we should not run over if the Democratic Party wins.

First, we should not indulge in the same "because we can" grasping that has been so offensive from the Republicans. If our guy is caught in a crime (even perjury about sex) let him take the consequences. Let the course of justice follow impartial norms, rather than quietly knifing the uncooperative and freeing the henchmen. Rule of law is not to be trifled with. I'm going to go so far as to say that the Supreme Court should be let alone, or reformed on non-partisan lines.

Gerrymandering could well be dismantled, but on a non-partisan basis. We already have a rule that equal protection under the law requires that Congressional districts be roughly equal in size. The same principle can be extended to say it must be balanced, subject to equal populations, by income and education or at least put in coherent units of common economic interest. Assigning the job of balance to non-partisan commissions would be good.

There's a limit to avoiding taking advantage of opportunities for power, but it should be defensive rather than acquisitive. (By which I mean, a reasonable degree of procedural fairness is more important than forcing what we see as equitable outcomes, because everybody wants equity for their own case, but we are remarkably good at ignoring it for others.) We do not need to pack the court even over a reversal of Roe v Wade, but if the Supreme Court goes so far as to declare abortion to be murder, then self-defense requires that the court be at least given a composition reflecting the principles of the population as a whole. Reversing Roe v. Wade would devolve the issue to the people, but imposing limits on what the majority can legislate requires that the underlying rationale be one that the bulk of the population can agree to accept.

Likewise, there is talk of rolling back the law on Interstate Commerce to the situation before the 1930s when the Supreme Court held that New Deal programs were unconstitutional by virtue of being Federal. A constitutional amendment might be the best solution, but packing the court to save Social Security, Medicare and even Obamacare should not be ruled out.

Second, we need to learn to respect traditional values. Even if we don't agree with them, or we don't agree on how to implement them, a measure of mutual respect and even empathy can go a long way toward creating solutions that honor them. There is always a question of where to draw the line - some would say laws against mixed race marriage are just about "traditional values". But I am sure we can draw it much more respectfully than we have been. My general rule is to give everyone the same level of respect that I would give my boss, or other person who has power over me. I fear I broke that rule with KindaSkolarly on more than one occasion, but I tried mightily to frame things in terms of particular behaviors and not to characterize him as a person.

That means not insulting women who stay home to be homemakers (or men who do) or people who are into guns. It means a clear system of immigration control until such time as a clear majority of the population rejects that, and not accepting insults and dehumanization of those opposing immigration any more than we would of those seeking to immigrate.

And finally, the educated classes need to look out for those who are marginalized by economic trends. Serious thought needs to be given to developing employment for those who are not academically or technologically inclined. Incentives, like the Earned Income Tax Credit, are important and so are training opportunities to upgrade vital skills that might go neglected by the marketplace. Software to make services more efficient can be fostered by the government and not turned over free of obligations to corporations. (I list specific examples to illustrate the general area of priority rather than to raise these specific items as requirements.)

Instead of rejecting superstition as a simple violation of rationality, we need to learn to listen to it, and understand what it is telling us about our deep motivations and allegiances. Don't give it the last word, but think about why it is there, in a teleological framework rather than an explanatory framework. In other words, think about what values and feelings it represents and communicates, rather than stopping with an evaluation of its explanatory correctness.



The following user would like to thank Harry Marks for this post:
geo, Taylor
Sat Oct 31, 2020 4:17 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Beyond Genius

Silver Contributor

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 864
Location: Florida
Thanks: 368
Thanked: 523 times in 397 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Trump Watch
In less than 4 days the world will have witnessed what America thinks about current politics.

The removal of PSfB will be cheered on by people all over the world. But those cheers aren’t guaranteed to happen. We still have to vote PSfB out. No guarantee of that either. Metaphorically it’s perfect because in life there’s no reason to expect guaranteed outcomes.

Polling as it is, is just a series of what if’s. Biden-Harris could win by a slim margin or a blowout. The exact same can be written for PSfB.

So Harry is describing the possibility of ‘if’s’ .

I’m to old to fear the “if’s’ threat. I’m also inclined to think that ‘if’ Biden-Harris wins, that ‘if’ the Democratic Party wins a congressional majority there will be much work to be done just unfucking the bureaucratic degradation wrought by the Libertarian practices of the current regime. I’m also inclined to think that the Social Security’s secure act 2100 will be a top priority. Covid 19 will certainly be a time killer as well.(its more than just a public health concern). Health Care will be a hotly debated issue and will also be time consuming. DAKA will have its time of debate, reintroduction into the Paris Climate Accord will be the gateway for the U.S. back into a shared leadership role in the myriad issues that have been demeaned by PSfB’s America First austerity.

Packing the Supreme Court is for Biden a nonstarter. The implied alteration of the court is sufficient for the maintenance of the balance of power, checks and balances. The courts conservative majority may be a threat on the surface but it could also mean that cases presented to this new court will require an improved argumentative logic. I don’t at this time fear for Roe v. Wade as I don’t think that there will be a consensus among the public to re-litigate. My caveat is the ‘if’s’ . If Biden-Harris wins that consensus will wither. If PSfB is re-elected Roe v. Wade will be overturned.

Character matters, I think presenting a consistent character along with a correct moral character is what makes a difference. Presenting a barrage of conspiratorial claptrap is an example of constancy but correct moral reasoning is the core essential. A person is their character, when separated some portion of that person is a charade.

To be ‘into something’ like guns for example, is no guarantee against mockery. I grant that mockery may become a cruelty but is it not a truism that sometimes we must be cruel to be kind. I sometimes ‘kid’ in a mocking way but I also do it out of love. It’s a ‘way’ that some people have used to communicate an idea, mockery is not always ideal so it is not the only arrow in the quiver.

I think that the ‘if come’ of a Biden-Harris regime will have its hands full just in dealing with surface level issues. I think that for them they’ll have approximately two years to handle the surface issues in a way that does have a broad consensus and a majority support, 2022 will be here before we know it, there will be the need to maintain the ‘if’s’ of that Democratic majority. Beyond that, there is 2024. In those final two years It will be Biden-Harris’s job to prepare the U.S. for the potential of the first female president, the first who also happens to be nonwhite.

Not a big deal for some people but for others it may be a big deal. I wonder of the ‘if’s’ to come?.



The following user would like to thank Taylor for this post:
DWill, geo, Harry Marks
Sun Nov 01, 2020 10:18 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6016
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2440
Thanked: 2382 times in 1796 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Trump Watch
Here is a rather refreshing article from today's Murdoch press in Australia commenting on the US election

Quote:
Time for America to tip Trump into history’s bin
TROY BRAMSTON
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/commen ... c9253afb86

11:00PM NOVEMBER 2, 2020
1307 COMMENTS
Donald Trump is the worst president in US history. Tonight (AEDT), Americans have an opportunity to terminate his chaotic, dysfunctional, divisive, dangerous and degraded administration. While Trump might yet achieve another remarkable election victory, the odds are against him. Americans, we can hope, are wise enough to recognise it is time to bring the curtain down on The Trump Show.

Trump has debased the office of president, divided rather than united the country, and diminished the standing of the US overseas. He has lied thousands of times, deliberately downplayed the threat of COVID-19, withheld aid to Ukraine unless Kiev investigated Joe Biden’s family, and used the presidency to enrich his businesses. He deserved to be impeached.

Nobody should excuse Trump’s unhinged rhetoric or deranged tweets as merely a sideshow. This behaviour should not be normalised. Words matter. Trump boasted about sexually assaulting women with his “grab ’em by the pussy” remark. He called dead American soldiers “losers” and “suckers”. He accused Barack Obama of being “corrupt” and said he should be “locked up”. All this is indefensible.

It underscores Trump’s authoritarian instincts. He admires totalitarians such as Kim Jong-un, Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping. He undermines institutions and alliances. He calls the media “the enemy of the people”. He declares the election “rigged”. He supports voter suppression and intimidation tactics. He talks about not accepting the election result and governing beyond the two-term constitutional limit.

There has never been a more chaotic White House. Trump has cycled through more cabinet members and staff than any other president. He is totally inept at running the executive government. It is telling that almost all of those who were fired or quit have turned on Trump and said he is not up to the job. Trump’s defenders once argued that even if you disliked Trump, you could trust the people around him. Well, their verdict has been damning.

Trump has no plan for a second term. The Republican National Convention did not adopt a new platform this year. Trump has almost destroyed the Grand Old Party of Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald Reagan and the Bushes. It has become a cult of personality. It is a party of grievances, cultural anxiety and economic insecurity. It has become a haven for white supremacists, xenophobes, protectionists, isolationists and conspiracy theorists.

It is revealing that George W. Bush has not endorsed Trump. Mitt Romney, who courageously voted for impeachment, did not vote for Trump. John McCain’s widow, Cindy, endorsed Biden. In 2016, George H.W. Bush voted for Hillary Clinton. Many Republican governors, congressmen and women, and cabinet members have endorsed Biden. They are sick of the narcissism, malice, dishonesty, ignorance and incompetence.

Like almost any presidential candidate, Biden has flaws. He would be the oldest president. He is not as sharp as he was. But he is lean and fit, and his debate performances showed no cognitive decline. This argument that Biden’s gaffes or stumbles — largely due to his stutter — disqualify him is absurd given Trump’s crazy rantings. And the suggestion Biden has profited from his son’s questionable business dealings has been debunked by The Wall Street Journal.

Biden’s central appeal is to restore normality to the presidency. He campaigns on rebuilding respect for the US abroad and rebuilding traditional alliances. He promises to bring Americans together. He feels compelled to say he will abide by the law and the constitution. He is experienced. He is a moderate centrist who can work across the political divide. He has united Democrats and built a broad coalition of voter support. Biden is a man of compassion, decency and integrity. He is a safe choice for president.

The biggest election issue is COVID-19. Trump’s handling of the pandemic has been the worst of any comparable advanced economy. He said the virus was contained and would go away quickly, then delayed acting, and when he did finally act, his response was catastrophic. He attacked lockdowns, lampooned mask-wearing and ridiculed social distancing. He embraced unproven medical treatments, suggested injecting bleach and endorsed ­advice from dubious medical ­sources.

Most voters believe Trump would not have become infected with the virus if he had taken it more seriously. He has endangered the lives of many Americans. White House gatherings have become superspreader events. A study by Stanford University estimated that 30,000 people have become infected and 700 have died as a result of just 18 Trump rallies. There is no other conclusion: Trump’s rallies are killing people.

Trump is well behind Biden and the odds are he is headed for defeat. None of this should come as a surprise given his utterly disastrous presidency. He has never been a popular president. Most Americans think the country is on the wrong track. Back in February, I wrote that Trump was vulnerable and his re-election was far from assured. Yet Trump would be the first president in almost 30 years not to be re-elected.

Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush are the only presidents since 1932 to win an election and serve a full term but not be re-elected. But Carter and Bush were both decent men and esteem for them has only risen since they left the White House. In sharp contrast, Trump is loathed by most Americans, he has violated presidential norms and conventions, and his policy failures are manifest.

Franklin D. Roosevelt — the greatest president of the 20th century — said the presidency was “pre-eminently a place of moral leadership”.

Trump is not the first president to fail this test but his collective failures dwarf all others. The choice for Americans is clear. They should elect Biden and send Trump to the dustbin of history. It’s the first step towards making America great again.

TROY BRAMSTON, SENIOR WRITER
Troy Bramston is a senior writer and columnist with The Australian and a contributor to Sky News. He is the author or editor of nine books, including Robert Menzies: The Art of Politics, Paul Keating: The Bi...


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Last edited by Robert Tulip on Tue Nov 03, 2020 12:36 am, edited 1 time in total.



The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
DWill, Harry Marks, Interbane
Tue Nov 03, 2020 12:10 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6755
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2083
Thanked: 2330 times in 1759 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Trump Watch
Waiting with bated breath. Some of us have likened the 2016 shock and aftereffects to PTSD. That's exaggerated, but still the memory of that morning after remains a painful one. You don't need to have enormous faith in Biden or the Democrats to believe that they give the country a better chance to deal with its pressing problems. Trump gives us no chance at all, only regression.



The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
Harry Marks
Tue Nov 03, 2020 12:49 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

BookTalk.org Moderator
Platinum Contributor

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 4588
Location: NC
Thanks: 2041
Thanked: 2091 times in 1557 posts
Gender: Male

Post Re: Trump Watch
DWill wrote:
Waiting with bated breath.


I'm starting to breathe a little easier now. Biden still leads in Arizona, and now also in Pennsylvania and Georgia. Though the race is very close in these states, it certainly appears that Biden is in a much better position than Trump.

I watched Trump's press conference from the White House last night, wherein he alleges massive voter fraud, and basically tries to throw democracy under the bus to save face, just as he did in 2016. The news media has to constantly remind viewers that these assertions are baseless. Even the FoxNews anchors were saying that there has to be evidence before the courts can take such allegations seriously. Trump's statements last night were appalling and pathetic. What seems apparent to me now is that Trump actually believes the narrative of voter fraud. How else could he could be losing? And herein is the problem with narcissistic personality disorder. But there is a basic flaw in Trump's logic. On the one hand, he praises the gains made in the House, and the fact that Republicans will hold on to the Senate, but somehow his own apparent loss is not possible without massive voter fraud. And, yet, these gains are on the same ballots that he is trying to contest. He wants his cake and to eat it too!


_________________
-Geo
Question everything


The following user would like to thank geo for this post:
DWill, Harry Marks, Robert Tulip
Fri Nov 06, 2020 11:34 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Beyond Genius

Silver Contributor

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 864
Location: Florida
Thanks: 368
Thanked: 523 times in 397 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Trump Watch
My vow :-D . I promise that as soon as Biden-Harris get the official victory count, I will stop referring to dear leader as PSfB :shock: That is.. as soon as he is escorted out of the White House :clap2:.



Fri Nov 06, 2020 9:31 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6016
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2440
Thanked: 2382 times in 1796 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Trump Watch
geo wrote:
I watched Trump's press conference from the White House last night, wherein he alleges massive voter fraud, and basically tries to throw democracy under the bus to save face, just as he did in 2016. The news media has to constantly remind viewers that these assertions are baseless. Even the FoxNews anchors were saying that there has to be evidence before the courts can take such allegations seriously. Trump's statements last night were appalling and pathetic. What seems apparent to me now is that Trump actually believes the narrative of voter fraud. How else could he could be losing? And herein is the problem with narcissistic personality disorder. But there is a basic flaw in Trump's logic. On the one hand, he praises the gains made in the House, and the fact that Republicans will hold on to the Senate, but somehow his own apparent loss is not possible without massive voter fraud. And, yet, these gains are on the same ballots that he is trying to contest. He wants his cake and to eat it too!

Reminds me of this

Adolph Hitler wrote:
I die with a joyful heart in my knowledge of the immeasurable deeds and achievements of our soldiers at the front, of our women at home, of our peasants and workers and of the contribution, unique in history, of our youth which bears my name… (It’s my) wish that they should therefore not give up the struggle under any circumstances, but carry it on wherever they may be against the enemies of the fatherland… https://thewire.in/history/hubris-delusion-adolf-hitler


_________________
http://rtulip.net


The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
geo, Harry Marks
Fri Nov 06, 2020 9:52 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

BookTalk.org Moderator
Platinum Contributor

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 4588
Location: NC
Thanks: 2041
Thanked: 2091 times in 1557 posts
Gender: Male

Post Re: Trump Watch
Taylor wrote:
My vow :-D . I promise that as soon as Biden-Harris get the official victory count, I will stop referring to dear leader as PSfB :shock: That is.. as soon as he is escorted out of the White House :clap2:.

I've always been too embarrassed to ask. What does PSfB mean?


_________________
-Geo
Question everything


Sat Nov 07, 2020 11:38 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
One more post ought to do it.

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3260
Location: Cheshire, England
Thanks: 329
Thanked: 683 times in 524 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United Kingdom (uk)

Post Re: Trump Watch
Well done!! Hurrah!! For you’.


_________________
Only those become weary of angling who bring nothing to it but the idea of catching fish.

He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad....

Rafael Sabatini


The following user would like to thank Penelope for this post:
geo, Harry Marks, Taylor
Sat Nov 07, 2020 12:01 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Beyond Genius

Silver Contributor

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 864
Location: Florida
Thanks: 368
Thanked: 523 times in 397 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Trump Watch
geo wrote:
Taylor wrote:
My vow :-D . I promise that as soon as Biden-Harris get the official victory count, I will stop referring to dear leader as PSfB :shock: That is.. as soon as he is escorted out of the White House :clap2:.

I've always been too embarrassed to ask. What does PSfB mean?


@ Geo: Thanks for asking :mrgreen:

I’m almost to embarrassed to admit :wink:

President Shit for Brains = PSfB

I stopped writing it in full because I didn’t want to upset people by overly foul language.

I do try to be upmost in civility, poetics, originality of thought But these past four plus years had put me out of sorts.

I’m thinking that I can get some sense of peace of mind now that the people of this country have put PSfB out to pasture.
I have hope for this country again. :)



The following user would like to thank Taylor for this post:
DWill, geo, Harry Marks
Sat Nov 07, 2020 12:10 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 6016
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2440
Thanked: 2382 times in 1796 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Trump Watch
Adolph Hitler wrote:
I die with a joyful heart in my knowledge of the immeasurable deeds and achievements of our soldiers at the front, of our women at home, of our peasants and workers and of the contribution, unique in history, of our youth which bears my name… (It’s my) wish that they should therefore not give up the struggle under any circumstances, but carry it on wherever they may be against the enemies of the fatherland… https://thewire.in/history/hubris-delusion-adolf-hitler


Caught on film: rare archival footage: https://www.facebook.com/katcon86/video ... 0730060092

:clap:


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Sun Nov 08, 2020 3:36 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6755
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2083
Thanked: 2330 times in 1759 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Trump Watch
Penelope wrote:
Well done!! Hurrah!! For you’.

Thank you, Penelope! The euphoria will fade, but we'll enjoy it as long as possible. A great weight has been lifted.



The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
Harry Marks
Sun Nov 08, 2020 5:53 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor
Book Discussion Leader

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6755
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 2083
Thanked: 2330 times in 1759 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Trump Watch
It was nice of Penelope to send her congrats from the UK. We'll soon be rid of perhaps the only truly malevolent president ever to occupy the WH. But there is still some embarrassment in the reality of 71 million Americans voting for a man who doesn't know what our country is about and will go very far to subvert that country. That we now have a patriot waiting in the wings does merit a big sigh of relief.

Why won't Trump fold his hand and prepare to vacate the office? He's many things, but not stupid enough to miss the writing on the wall in bold, Sharpie strokes. He lost. The best explanation I've seen is that he simply needs more time--time to run a final scam on the public. Fundraising letters have been going out, imploring his supporters to fund the election challenges that could keep their hero in office. The small print on these letters reveal the scam: All of the smaller donations ("smaller" meaning less than $8,000) will go to the RNC to be used for purposes such as funding the Republican Senate candidates in Georgia, and to Trump's leadership PAC, Save America, a slush fund for him to use any way he wants, including but not limited to advancing his return as a candidate in 2024.

That last, scary, possibility underscores the importance of not letting up on holding Trump to account for crimes he may have committed during or before his term.

https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-usa- ... NKBN27R30B



The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
geo
Thu Nov 12, 2020 8:41 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 269 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.Evaluations: 1, 5.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Community Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Book Discussion Leaders

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
Banned Books
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Coming Soon!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
Promote your FICTION book
Promote your NON-FICTION book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2019. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank