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Best Way to Get Books? 

How do you typically obtain your books?
Purchase (Online) 50%  50%  [ 2 ]
Purchase (In-Store) 50%  50%  [ 2 ]
Rent (from library) 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Borrow 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 4

Best Way to Get Books? 
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 Best Way to Get Books?
Hi all,

I've just picked up reading as an active hobby of mine! I currently visit the library to obtain my books most of the time, but have found limited availability an inconvenience at times. I was wondering how most of you all obtain your books? What are some of the pros and cons you've noticed through obtaining books via various methods (online, in-store, library, etc.)? Thanks for the insight everyone!



Thu Mar 01, 2018 7:42 pm
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 Re: Best Way to Get Books?
The best way I know to get books is from library book sales. People donate books to their town library which then sells them dirt cheap. There is a website that tells you where and when to find them.

http://www.booksalefinder.com/NJ.html

Rare is the book costing more than $3.00. The best sales, of course, are held in the libraries of ritzy towns I couldn't afford to buy lunch in. But those people are readers and their library book sales can have 10,000 or more books in a wide variety of categories. Hardcover books in perfect dust jackets sell for $2. I don't even look at the 50 cent paperbacks -- there's no point.. You can find first editions, rare books, old books from people's grandparents' libraries they dug out of dusty boxes in the attic. Almost every hardcover is $2 except for the oversize, glossy art books.

Some of these sales go on for 2 or 3 days and the key is to get there early on the first day ahead of the people who sell on Amazon or B&N. I know they're just trying to make a living and I don't care.

The books are donated, not library books, so don't have the ink stamps and plastic covers. You see a library book here and there but not many. I've walked out of these sales with 10 to 20 beautiful hardcover classics, having paid $20 to $40. Library book sales are the closest thing to heaven I've ever seen (except for girls) ;).


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Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:21 am
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
Thanks for the response, and wow! Sounds like a great way to get books for cheap! I’ll definitely have to look into them! Do you ever buy new books? Say, the hot new releases you just have to read now? If so, have you found any way to obtain these that saves on cost at all? I ask because, while I certainly read books that would appear at these library sales, there are also some new releases that really capture my attention and interest...but tend to be somewhat costly at bookstores, even on Amazon most of the time.



Fri Mar 02, 2018 9:24 am
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
There are relatively new releases at these sales. But it doesn't matter to me I have a huge TBR list and I find worthwhile books at every big sale. I don't buy paperbacks at all anymore and bookstore prices for a hardcover? No way. Just try one big sale and you'll be hooked like a meth head. But with books so that would be better. :) I do look for bargains on Amazon if I want a particular book, but in hardcover only.


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Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:32 pm
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
Okay, great to know! Yeah, hardcover prices can get up there. Do you typically find good deals on Amazon? Thanks for all of the insight and advice! I’m excited for more posts to come through I’m curious to learn if anyone else seeks out these library sales and what other methods are being used to obtain books. Always great to get informstion from the source!



Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:35 pm
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
Easiest for me is through e-books. I just need an internet connection. Comes in handy too for travel. But the only thing I don't like is that reading off a screen strains my eyes!



Mon Mar 12, 2018 12:23 am
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
treder wrote:
Easiest for me is through e-books. I just need an internet connection. Comes in handy too for travel. But the only thing I don't like is that reading off a screen strains my eyes!

E-books can certainly be the most convenient option! Is that the primary reason you're drawn to e-books, or is it more so the portability aspect? I agree, however, that the strain on the eyes is certainly a drawback. Just one of the reasons I'm still drawn to print over electronic reading. Do you have an e-book subscription, like Amazon's audible for example? I've always been intrigued by that, or at least the idea of it haha.



Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:19 pm
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
I just voted in your poll. First vote, so as of now it's 100% in-store purchases.

I only buy books from force of habit now. Boxes full of fiction I'll never get to are everywhere, so I don't bother anymore with that stuff. But I keep an eye out for reference books. The other day I picked up a book of the letters of Bruce Chatwin. Never read any of Chatwin's work, but he corresponded with some well-known people, and they're indexed in the back. So that qualifies the book as reference. It's in perfect shape. I paid a buck, and the thing was published by Viking at $35. At those prices it's hard not to continue adding to the reference books.


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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
KindaSkolarly wrote:
I just voted in your poll. First vote, so as of now it's 100% in-store purchases.

I only buy books from force of habit now. Boxes full of fiction I'll never get to are everywhere, so I don't bother anymore with that stuff. But I keep an eye out for reference books. The other day I picked up a book of the letters of Bruce Chatwin. Never read any of Chatwin's work, but he corresponded with some well-known people, and they're indexed in the back. So that qualifies the book as reference. It's in perfect shape. I paid a buck, and the thing was published by Viking at $35. At those prices it's hard not to continue adding to the reference books.


Thanks for voting and being the first vote! And thank you for sharing. Do you purchase any other types of books? Do you find any cost issues in those cases?



Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:01 pm
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
I voted "In Store", but I don't usually purchase in stores such as B&N, etc. I purchase most of my books at thrift "stores" ;) and library sales (They have these every Spring and Fall)! The last day of the library sale in my area, is $1/bag day, so I usually end up bringing home 200-1000 books depending on the selections and materials. I am an avid reader and can read anywhere from 2-6 books a week, so I try to keep a well stocked in-home library. Currently, I believe we have 1,500 books between my husband and I. We just did a purge and donated around 1,000 books at the beginning of the year.

I also utilize my local library as well. It's the best way for me to get my hands on the new releases without paying big bucks for them at the big box stores. I will say this, even though I rarely get to go there and when I do, I rarely buy anything...Barnes and Noble is one of my most favorite places to be!


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Last edited by CharChar84 on Tue Apr 10, 2018 8:44 am, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Apr 10, 2018 8:42 am
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
CharChar84 wrote:
I voted "In Store", but I don't usually purchase in stores such as B&N, etc. I purchase most of my books at thrift "stores" ;) and library sales (They have these every Spring and Fall)! The last day of the library sale in my area, is $1/bag day, so I usually end up bringing home 200-1000 books depending on the selections and materials. I am an avid reader and can read anywhere from 2-6 books a week, so I try to keep a well stocked in-home library. Currently, I believe we have 1,500 books between my husband and I. We just did a purge and donated around 1,000 books at the beginning of the year.

I also utilize my local library as well. It's the best way for me to get my hands on the new releases without paying big bucks for them at the big box stores. I will say this, even though I rarely get to go there and when I do, I rarely buy anything...Barnes and Noble is one of my most favorite places to be!

Wow, awesome, thanks for sharing! You take buying in bulk to the ultimate level :up: ! Do you often re-read books you have amassed in your home library? Yeah, I almost always go to my local library for that exact reason, to save money. B&N is a great place to visit...just to be surrounded by so many great reads makes for an enjoyable few hours! Have you gotten involved in the digital reading movement with ereaders/ebooks at all? I know that they offer many benefits but I haven't yet looked too deeply into them.



Tue Apr 10, 2018 11:09 am
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
My best ways to get books (in my opinion) are :
- Purchasing books online stores
- Local bookstores w/ only new books
- Used book stores
- Library book sales

even though used book stores do have their charm and overall roaming around in a shop filled with old books is a blast, I still cannot find all the books from my reading list there.
Finding books from online stores is not as fun, but I can find and get every single book that I desperately need at least when I am ready to stump up the cash.
I also like library book sales. This is mainly because I live nearby an academic library which has nearly all of the categories that I love to read about. When entering the book sales you never know what treasures you might wander upon.
Although I like library book sales I hate borrowing/renting books. I love to own the books and add them to my growing personal non-fiction library.



Sat Sep 21, 2019 1:10 pm
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
This is an interesting question. Given all the books out there, how do you know what to read? Or to rephrase that, how do you avoid the bad or mediocre books that just waste your time? Well that is what I am going to try to answer. Though I think we need a more fitting set first.

So I've gotten a lot of questions on this particular subject in the past, but I'm just gonna go ahead and read the most recent one for you. I desperately need a video about how to efficiently develop a reading list that saves you from stumbling upon bad books, which may put you off a whole genre. I'd also like to know how to read more books in more diverse categories and how to avoid abandoning the older items on my list for a random book that I just heard of.

Now I do want to be a bit careful with this topic, because when I think back to some of the best books I've ever read, they've been things that I've just randomly picked off the library shelf or was given to by a friend, and I don't want you to avoid those serendipitous occasions. But given the absolute tirade of content that comes out of the publishing houses of the world and the internet, in the interest of helping you triage all the options out there, I want to give you some recommendations for how to find the best books in a particular genre, and avoid wasting your times on the bad ones or the mediocre ones, or the ones that are just kind of padded out for sales value if nothing else.

And the first thing I'm gonna talk about is one of my favorite websites in the world, which is GoodReads.com. I've been on Good Reads for quite a long time, and I found many of my favorite books in Good Reads recommendation lists which I would highly recommend checking out.

For instance, one of my favorite nonfiction books of all time, Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything", was right near the top of one of Good Read's best nonfiction of all time lists, and that's actually where I found it. And GoodReads is useful for other things
besides just its list feature.

If you do see a book on a shelf at Barnes and Noble or some bookstore or a library and you're not sure whether or not to read it, the reviews on GoodReads can be highly detailed and can be very good ways to triage the books you have on your list to figure out what you should prioritize, and a lot of authors actually have very active Good Reads profiles.

In fact, Pat Rothfuss, who wrote "The Name of the Wind", which is one of my top five fiction novels of all time has an incredibly long review history, which I have perused many times in the past, and one day when I was just casually scrolling through it, I saw that he had written a five star review for a fiction book, called "The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland "in a Ship of Her Own Making", so I picked this up, read it, and even though it's kind of a YA novel, I found it to be a really good read.

So in short, GoodReads gives you an extensive database of lists of all different types of genres. I mean I've found cyber punk novels on their lists. I've found hacker history and crime history stuff on their lists, and even save money books so whatever it is, you can probably find a list about it.

It also has a huge user base so there's lots of reviews for most books out there, and you can use the review histories of lots of your favorite authors who are active on the platform to find new books that they liked and which you may like as well.

Now another great way to figure out whether or not a book is worth your time is to read a summary of it, and there are actually several resources on the internet that you can go to to find lots and lots of book summaries.

Thank you for reading please give me credit for this answer and visit my site/


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Last edited by nadeem on Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:25 pm
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Post Re: Best Way to Get Books?
This is an interesting question. Given all the books out there, how do you know what to read? Or to rephrase that, how do you avoid the bad or mediocre books that just waste your time? Well that is what I am going to try to answer. Though I think we need a more fitting set first.

So I've gotten a lot of questions on this particular subject in the past, but I'm just gonna go ahead and read the most recent one for you. I desperately need a video about how to efficiently develop a reading list that saves you from stumbling upon bad books, which may put you off a whole genre. I'd also like to know how to read more books in more diverse categories and how to avoid abandoning the older items on my list for a random book that I just heard of.

Now I do want to be a bit careful with this topic, because when I think back to some of the best books I've ever read, they've been things that I've just randomly picked off the library shelf or was given to by a friend, and I don't want you to avoid those serendipitous occasions. But given the absolute tirade of content that comes out of the publishing houses of the world and the internet, in the interest of helping you triage all the options out there, I want to give you some recommendations for how to find the best books in a particular genre, and avoid wasting your times on the bad ones or the mediocre ones, or the ones that are just kind of padded out for sales value if nothing else.

And the first thing I'm gonna talk about is one of my favorite websites in the world, which is GoodReads.com. I've been on Good Reads for quite a long time, and I found many of my favorite books in Good Reads recommendation lists which I would highly recommend checking out.

For instance, one of my favorite nonfiction books of all time, Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything", was right near the top of one of Good Read's best nonfiction of all time lists, and that's actually where I found it. And GoodReads is useful for other things
besides just its list feature.

If you do see a book on a shelf at Barnes and Noble or some bookstore or a library and you're not sure whether or not to read it, the reviews on GoodReads can be highly detailed and can be very good ways to triage the books you have on your list to figure out what you should prioritize, and a lot of authors actually have very active Good Reads profiles.

In fact, Pat Rothfuss, who wrote "The Name of the Wind", which is one of my top five fiction novels of all time has an incredibly long review history, which I have perused many times in the past, and one day when I was just casually scrolling through it, I saw that he had written a five star review for a fiction book, called "The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland "in a Ship of Her Own Making", so I picked this up, read it, and even though it's kind of a YA novel, I found it to be a really good read.

So in short, GoodReads gives you an extensive database of lists of all different types of genres. I mean I've found cyber punk novels on their lists. I've found hacker history and crime history stuff on their lists, and even save money books so whatever it is, you can probably find a list about it.

It also has a huge user base so there's lots of reviews for most books out there, and you can use the review histories of lots of your favorite authors who are active on the platform to find new books that they liked and which you may like as well.

Now another great way to figure out whether or not a book is worth your time is to read a summary of it, and there are actually several resources on the internet that you can go to to find lots and lots of book summaries.


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Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:35 pm
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