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The Coup against Donald Trump 
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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Clearing out bookmarks. These relate to the Spygate coup against Trump:

VIDEO: Jeanine Pirro’s Opening Statement: Predicts Obama’s Downfall as They All Turn Against Him
investmentwatchblog.com/video-jeanine-p ... ainst-him/

Joe di Genova: Barack Obama Knew James Comey Was Going to Blackmail the incoming President
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VT2kR9O ... e=youtu.be

FBI texts: Obama 'wants to know everything we're doing'
nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/fbi- ... ng-n845531

Trump Coup Biggest Violation of Constitution in History – Former CIA Officer
President Trump says the Deep State tried and failed to remove him from office in a coup. Former CIA Officer and whistleblower Kevin Shipp says the attempted coup on Trump was a global conspiracy. Shipp explains, “Yes, this is a coup. This is the most shocking violation of the Constitution and criminal activity in the history, not just of America, but of a western government. Much of this rises to the level of treason. People need to understand how shocking this is. It was a clear conspiracy. There will be arrests and indictments without question. . . . This was a coup. It was a conspiracy. It was criminal activity. These people need to be indicted, charged and need to be put in prison, and if they’re not, then our Constitution is nothing more than a sham. This was a coup against a duly elected President, and people need to understand how serious this is.”
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/51507.htm

The Russiagate Hoax and Uranium One
It was obvious the whole Russiagate thing was a complete Hoax a few days after Crowdstrike issued their ridiculous report in July 2016, which contained no evidence whatsoever of any hacking, except for some 4 year old Ukrainian malmare, freely available on the net, which anyone could have put on the DNC server (including Crowdstrike themselves as a False Flag / Red Herring).
investmentwatchblog.com/the-russiagate- ... anium-one/

We now understand some of the mechanics of what happened in the Intelligence services' coup against Trump. Under Obama the US intelligence community became politicized. Obama fired conservatives and replaced them with leftists, fired nationalists and replaced them with globalists. Because of their anti-American convictions, the heads of the intelligence agencies tried to prevent Trump (a nationalist) from gaining the White House, and then once he was there they tried to remove him by blatantly lying about him being a Russian spy.

It looks as if many people will go to jail because of the coup, and Obama could be impeached (yes, even FORMER presidents are subject to impeachment). Wouldn't that be the cherry on the double helping of crow, for OBAMA to be impeached rather than TRUMP? Hardee har har.


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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Are you trying to claim the mantle of the late Harold Camping, shifting over to the political realm?



Mon May 20, 2019 4:28 pm
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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Drunk on the coup-laid again. Too late for an intervention.
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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Robert Tulip wrote:
A key theme here is political attitudes toward cultural relativism, the idea that all cultures are equal, something only supported on the left as part of political correctness. For cultural relativism, the existence of the state of Israel is obnoxious due to Israel's rejection of equality between Jews and Arabs for existential security reasons. Conservatives tend to see Israel as a beacon of modernity in a backward region of the world, while leftists focus on the assumption of cultural equality, against which Israel's security policies are unacceptable, with progressives often tending to ignore the widespread overt Arab anti-Semitism.
I don't think cultural relativism usually asserts that all cultures are equal. Rather the idea is to oppose the pervasive process by which the "winners" write the history and the interpretations and the justifications. Power doesn't determine truth. Cultural relativism, to my understanding, was and is centrally aimed at assessing behavior within a cultural context, and it may or may not apologize for behavior we would rate as unacceptable in our own culture.

Is it wrong for calligraphy quality to help determine whether a scholar should be given a role in power? Is it wrong for Asians to be excluded from opportunities in the economy of America? Is it wrong for resources to be legally assigned as property of whoever first seizes them, rather than in the interest of the general public? Cultural factors can help us make sense of such actions, and we can decide whether we agree with the cultural choices, or indeed whether we approve of the practices, independently of understanding them. What would be fairly shortsided is to impose disapproval of foreign practices simply because they disagree with ours. Some deeper reason is required.

Robert Tulip wrote:
The problem here is that people find it impolite to discuss cultural differences. This situation then means that false assumptions fester, while efforts to address festering problems cannot gain political traction. For example Arab illiteracy seems to have roots in Islamic culture, but the taboo on cultural criticism means this major problem is little understood or discussed.
I think you exaggerate the taboo. Among specialists I would be very surprised if anything of significance remains little understood or discussed. Among the general public, such discussions are likely to be largely about emotional expression rather than about gaining understanding.

Robert Tulip wrote:
The result is that an evidence-based theory of change cannot be widely discussed, there is wide ignorance of facts, and when people look at the Middle East they jump to the simplistic conclusion of blaming Israel. Together with the growth of simplistic socialism, the result is that anti-Semitic prejudice now finds a natural home on the political left, as seen by the discomfort of Mr Corbyn in straddling the fence of contradictions that this all produces for British Labour.
I think it is only natural to hold the more powerful side in a conflict to a higher standard. "Because we can" is not a valid moral reason for behaving unjustly, but it is quite common for human groups to take that mistaken option, justifying themselves emotionally rather than morally. There is no question that Israel created an ethnic cleansing campaign at its birth, the Nakba. Nor that propagandists created an alternative version in which the village massacres were fictions created by Arab radio and the exodus of Arab Palestinians was entirely voluntary out of ginned-up fear. There is no question that Israel continues to dominate the water resources of the area and allocate them to Jewish farms. There is no question that Israel excludes land sales by Jews to Arabs, preventing the same kind of gradual change in the land status that was effected by Zionists in the first part of the 20th century, or that illegal settlements continue, and continue to be authorized and enforced by Israel on the West Bank.

Some of that is excused by desperation. But the claim that it is all necessitated by defensive needs has long since passed into lack of credibility, functioning as a rhetorical talking point like the original claims that the ethnic cleansing was an Arab fabrication. These talking points have now come to include branding anyone who is critical of Israeli "security" policy as anti-Semitic. I think it is often fair to label such criticism "one-sided", but to then evoke anti-Semitism is not nearly as credible. The criticism should be addressed directly, and if it is one-sided, explain why that is a reasonable conclusion. But unless the criticism of policy can be associated with antipathy toward jews and Judaism, regardless of the policy issues at stake, then it will rightly be seen as just rhetorical overstatement.

I have seen maps of "Judea and Samaria" that include parts of Jordan (across the Jordan river from the West Bank), Lebanon and Syria. This is the land that extremists believe they are entitled to. And that people like Netanyahu's father believe Israel must take possession of to be secure. Needless to say this means depriving the Arabs in these lands of the right to vote, if not ousting them outright. Just as there are Arab extremists, who get a lot of attention from the pro-Israel commentators, so there are Israeli extremists (which a lot of Israelis know first-hand) who include the assassin of Yitzhak Rabin. We should be doing all we legally can, for the sake of Israelis, to separate these extremists from power. And their enablers, who label any criticism of policies that enable these extremists as anti-Semitic, should be refuted thoroughly.

Robert Tulip wrote:
That is not to ignore the problem of right wing extremism, only to note that neo-Nazism is a tiny problem by comparison to broad cultural trends that should be analysed at the level of mass opinion. My impression is that the current cultural and political trends are pushing Jews more into alliance with conservative politics, even though 71% of American Jewish voters supported Clinton in 2016.
One could as easily claim that current cultural and political trends are pushing Gentiles into resisting AIPAC and all other lobbying groups that are pro-Israel. It really depends on how far-sighted or paranoid each group behaves. Claiming that defensiveness is forced, and even more that deceptive rhetoric is forced, puts up a high bar of evidence to be satisfied. But then, that is the ace that extremists keep in the hole - the more they provoke, the more the equally short-sighted response gives them credibility. So far American Jews have been, in my opinion, exceedingly patient and far-sighted. Others see the matter differently, I expect.



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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
I don't think it's a good idea to go to Wikipedia for information; it's as likely to tell you that Genghis Khan was the father of Emily Dickinson as anything else. Usually best to go to primary sources.



Wed May 22, 2019 12:32 pm
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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
vizitelly wrote:
I don't think it's a good idea to go to Wikipedia for information; it's as likely to tell you that Genghis Khan was the father of Emily Dickinson as anything else. Usually best to go to primary sources.

Sorry vizitelly, but your suggestion to avoid Wikipedia is extremely bad advice. Wikipedia is a clearing house for public knowledge and is generally reliable and useful as a first port of call, shifting the paradigm on access to information. There is good reason why Wikipedia is so often at the top of google searches. For example, I have just looked at the entry on cultural relativism and found it very informative. False statements, let alone your absurd example, are usually immediately deleted. Sometimes unsourced or dubious statements are allowed to stand, but generally with a note indicating their status. People who whinge about Wikipedia often want to promote fringe ideas that are not accepted in mainstream scholarship.


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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
I was referring to the use of primary sources; previously, when discussing Palestine and Israel post-WW2, the best place to start looking is the writings, and subsequent commentaries on, of Husanyi.



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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Harry Marks wrote:
I don't think cultural relativism usually asserts that all cultures are equal.
Apologies, my definition was too truncated and derisive. The relativist view, that any culture can only be assessed on its own terms, is not logically coherent. It means there are no universal objective criteria to assess cultural values. This rejection of objectivity implies there is no way to assess inequality between cultural values. So the equality of all cultures is a perverse implication of cultural relativism, not an explicit doctrine.
Harry Marks wrote:
Rather the idea is to oppose the pervasive process by which the "winners" write the history and the interpretations and the justifications.
Such opposition to triumphal history is justified, but what I was getting at was that the opposition to empire must be careful to maintain a balanced view. Some aspects of Trump’s approach may be insane, but the cultural relativist reaction tends to downplay Western values and exaggerate the merits of non-Western cultures. Such a push towards a cultural relativist position is likely to prove an electoral negative in the USA, although it may be advocated by some intellectuals.
Harry Marks wrote:
Robert Tulip wrote:
The problem here is that people find it impolite to discuss cultural differences. This situation then means that false assumptions fester, while efforts to address festering problems cannot gain political traction. For example Arab illiteracy seems to have roots in Islamic culture, but the taboo on cultural criticism means this major problem is little understood or discussed.
I think you exaggerate the taboo. Among specialists I would be very surprised if anything of significance remains little understood or discussed. Among the general public, such discussions are likely to be largely about emotional expression rather than about gaining understanding.
Many academic specialists in cultural studies have emotional political commitments to their subject matter that make objectivity difficult.
Harry Marks wrote:
it is only natural to hold the more powerful side in a conflict to a higher standard.
Moving now to the Israel situation, your comment is fair in principle, except that the standard too many supporters of Palestine promote also needs to be raised from a focus on resentment and bitterness, camouflaging the problems of corruption and incompetence in the Palestinian Authority. Trump’s support for Israel reflects exasperation at the failure of the Palestinians to seek a realistic partnership with Israel.
Harry Marks wrote:
"Because we can" is not a valid moral reason for behaving unjustly, but it is quite common for human groups to take that mistaken option, justifying themselves emotionally rather than morally. There is no question that Israel created an ethnic cleansing campaign at its birth, the Nakba. Nor that propagandists created an alternative version in which the village massacres were fictions created by Arab radio and the exodus of Arab Palestinians was entirely voluntary out of ginned-up fear. There is no question that Israel continues to dominate the water resources of the area and allocate them to Jewish farms. There is no question that Israel excludes land sales by Jews to Arabs, preventing the same kind of gradual change in the land status that was effected by Zionists in the first part of the 20th century, or that illegal settlements continue, and continue to be authorized and enforced by Israel on the West Bank.
All true, but there is something very autocratic about Arab culture, with elections in Palestine postponed indefinitely. It makes trust in a negotiating partner hard to find. It is unspeakably sad that UNRWA supports intergenerational refugee status based on a forlorn political hope of right of return, when no Jews seek right of return for their assets seized after they fled Arab countries.
Harry Marks wrote:
Some of that is excused by desperation. But the claim that it is all necessitated by defensive needs has long since passed into lack of credibility, functioning as a rhetorical talking point like the original claims that the ethnic cleansing was an Arab fabrication. These talking points have now come to include branding anyone who is critical of Israeli "security" policy as anti-Semitic. I think it is often fair to label such criticism "one-sided", but to then evoke anti-Semitism is not nearly as credible. The criticism should be addressed directly, and if it is one-sided, explain why that is a reasonable conclusion. But unless the criticism of policy can be associated with antipathy toward jews and Judaism, regardless of the policy issues at stake, then it will rightly be seen as just rhetorical overstatement.
To liken Israel’s security situation to extremist propaganda and rhetoric is profoundly unrealistic. Broad Arab hatred towards Israel necessitates a hard line. Israel has the capacity to drag the Middle East into the modern world, if Islamists can somehow be inspired to abandon their anti-Semitism. Christianity has an important role with its theology of forgiveness and reconciliation.
Harry Marks wrote:
I have seen maps of "Judea and Samaria" that include parts of Jordan (across the Jordan river from the West Bank), Lebanon and Syria. This is the land that extremists believe they are entitled to. And that people like Netanyahu's father believe Israel must take possession of to be secure. Needless to say this means depriving the Arabs in these lands of the right to vote, if not ousting them outright. Just as there are Arab extremists, who get a lot of attention from the pro-Israel commentators, so there are Israeli extremists (which a lot of Israelis know first-hand) who include the assassin of Yitzhak Rabin. We should be doing all we legally can, for the sake of Israelis, to separate these extremists from power. And their enablers, who label any criticism of policies that enable these extremists as anti-Semitic, should be refuted thoroughly.
Once again you are presenting a complex situation in an overly simple way. Netanyahu’s father was a distinguished Professor of History at Cornell. Yes, he supported the ‘iron wall’ Jabotinsky line that remains influential in Likud, and yes the Israeli right dreams of recreating a Davidic kingdom. I remain of the view though that this extremism has arisen as a reaction against the extremism of anti-Semitism, first in the Holocaust and then in Arab hatred towards Israel.
Harry Marks wrote:
One could as easily claim that current cultural and political trends are pushing Gentiles into resisting AIPAC and all other lobbying groups that are pro-Israel. It really depends on how far-sighted or paranoid each group behaves. Claiming that defensiveness is forced, and even more that deceptive rhetoric is forced, puts up a high bar of evidence to be satisfied. But then, that is the ace that extremists keep in the hole - the more they provoke, the more the equally short-sighted response gives them credibility. So far American Jews have been, in my opinion, exceedingly patient and far-sighted. Others see the matter differently, I expect.
It will be interesting to see the extent to which Zionist over-reach undermines Western support for Israel. Your description of the ‘ace in the hole’ looks a bit fanciful, like Trump believing that his lies increase his support by undermining the concept of public truth. Such a hand can only go so far before the house of cards collapses as the ace turns out to be a two of spades. So I do think the future for Israel absolutely requires dialogue rather than intransigence, reconciliation rather than extremism. Unfortunately Trump seems incapable of seeing that security logic. The Wall Street Journal had an excellent article on May 24 covering these themes, arguing that Israel is formidable in diplomatic, economic and military terms, and can best serve its interests as a friend to Palestinians.


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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Any discussion about the Middle East and how to resolve or prevent conflict is, ultimately, a circular discussion because the Western powers still take an imperialist viewpoint : from Syria through to Morocco anybody could be forgiven for thinking that the impetus for intervention is still to pursue the C19th aim of containing Russia by denying her a warm water port. This, in the age of space exploration and the internet; America's answer - militarise space (from Reagan to Trump) or block the Eastern half of the planet from internet access (Huawei and God knows what else).
As long as USA and its Western allies use the Middle East as a buffer zone against what they still clearly think of as a potential Russian invasion (presumably to spread Communism - maybe, just to make it even more terrifying, it will be the Chinese) then there is no interest in trying to bring peace to the Middle East. This is why it is, at present, an intractable problem. A good start, though, would to be to understand that political ideologies are ideas and cannot be contained. If anybody asks why the richest nations in the world (The West) still suffer from poverty in all its forms, the answer is that their govts are spending the tax receipts in the Middle East.



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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
vizitelly wrote:
I was referring to the use of primary sources; previously, when discussing Palestine and Israel post-WW2, the best place to start looking is the writings, and subsequent commentaries on, of Husanyi.

I'm on the fence on the Wiki question. On the one hand I have heard they are as reliable as a typical encyclopedia, where experts are paid to get it right. On the other hand, my first-hand experience indicates that nothing commercial is to be trusted on Wikipedia (who has time to check the claims of a private school or Jiffy Lube about what it claims on Wikipedia? And for that matter, who has time to monitor to see that a competitor or a disgruntled student hasn't posted something specious?) and politically controversial topics are subject to wild and crazy rewrites. Once a difference of opinion gets involved, the process seems to sorth things out reasonably well.



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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Robert Tulip wrote:
Harry Marks wrote:
I don't think cultural relativism usually asserts that all cultures are equal.
Apologies, my definition was too truncated and derisive. The relativist view, that any culture can only be assessed on its own terms, is not logically coherent. It means there are no universal objective criteria to assess cultural values. This rejection of objectivity implies there is no way to assess inequality between cultural values. So the equality of all cultures is a perverse implication of cultural relativism, not an explicit doctrine.
Maybe. That is certainly better. I think we might be able to agree there are no universally agreed-upon criteria for assessing cultural values. That's where all the juice is. That is, we learn a lot about our values by discussing differences from the values of others.
Robert Tulip wrote:
Such opposition to triumphal history is justified, but what I was getting at was that the opposition to empire must be careful to maintain a balanced view. Some aspects of Trump’s approach may be insane, but the cultural relativist reaction tends to downplay Western values and exaggerate the merits of non-Western cultures. Such a push towards a cultural relativist position is likely to prove an electoral negative in the USA, although it may be advocated by some intellectuals.
That's an interesting way to state the matter. Anti-racism doesn't have to be about "exaggerating the merits of non-Western cultures" though it sometimes is. It's more like broadening the resources available for those seeking pride in identities that are traditionally suppressed. I was personally pleased by the way Tony Hillerman brought out the cultural resources of the Navajo culture in his novels, and that was before I found out I probably have an ancestor who was Native American (about 5 generations back, so about 1/32 or 1/64, depending on which version of the story one puts trust in). Recognizing the merits of the Iroquois Confederacy, or of Sequoyah, or of Tecumseh, is not exaggeration but it is a kind of excavation of buried truth. The current flap over putting Harriet Tubman on the twenty dollar bill has been labeled a case of political correctness by Dear Leader, as though there was nothing to admire or promote about Ms. Tubman. American bills feature Grover Cleveland, who is much less known than Harriet Tubman, and Salmon Chase, who is known almost exclusively for having a bank named after him except by a small coterie of historians. If contributions to the monetary system were the point, then Andrew Jackson belongs there only as the Devil's Advocate whose view helped to hold back sound monetary policy for 50 years. That would be a bit like naming a monument in Washington D.C. after John C Calhoun, the advocate of secession, for helping to get the question of secession settled in the Civil War. Conclusion? It's easier to allege that political correctness is distortion than to make it stick.

Robert Tulip wrote:
Many academic specialists in cultural studies have emotional political commitments to their subject matter that make objectivity difficult.
Well, we tend to accept a sort of "adversarial system" in which both sides can overstate their case. I realize the scope for publishing traditionalist or conservative perspectives is shrinking in many disciplines, but usually the answer is just to found a conservative journal and do excellent research for it. One has trouble imagining a "Journal of Implications of Widespread Arab Illiteracy" but it could of course cast a broader net. If no one else, Johns Hopkins or Univ. of Chicago is likely to edit and publish it.

Robert Tulip wrote:
the standard too many supporters of Palestine promote also needs to be raised from a focus on resentment and bitterness, camouflaging the problems of corruption and incompetence in the Palestinian Authority.
I rather think the problem is not the camouflage but the focus on resentment and bitterness. We have no problem identifying what a wreck those made of Germany after WWI, but somehow it seems lost on the scholarly community that they are foisting the same kind of intransigent self-sabotage on Palestinians. I know many people who found themselves moving out of a position of objectivity because they observed the harsh Israeli regime, yet it seems to me they are accepting the usual dichotomy imposed by conflict and somehow skip over the role of outside manipulators like the Ayatollahs of Iran and the Syrian puppetmaster wannabes.

The recent statement by a prominent Palestinian exhibited this intransigent mindset, perhaps without meaning to. He said Trump was not seeking peace but Palestinian "surrender". Well, surrender is what you do when you are defeated, in order to have a chance of getting on with your life. If they had pulled themselves together enough to make a proper surrender 25 years ago, Gaza and the West Bank could be much more livable now. I realize I am making a case for ignoring the injustice of the outcome, but I have a tendency to think that engaging in warfare sort of rules out appealing to morality. And of course I refuse to consider the alternative of statelessness for Jewry as somehow more moral.

Robert Tulip wrote:
Trump’s support for Israel reflects exasperation at the failure of the Palestinians to seek a realistic partnership with Israel.
I rather think it reflects Dear Leader's personality, obsessed with strength as it is, and the authoritarian mindset in general. Our Dear Leader is also given to the illusion that bullying is an effective negotiation tactic, and with the brilliance of Dunning and Kruger combined, has convinced himself that he is effective because of it.

Robert Tulip wrote:
there is something very autocratic about Arab culture, with elections in Palestine postponed indefinitely. It makes trust in a negotiating partner hard to find. It is unspeakably sad that UNRWA supports intergenerational refugee status based on a forlorn political hope of right of return, when no Jews seek right of return for their assets seized after they fled Arab countries.
A generous view is that the right of return is being held onto as a bargaining chip. A more realistic one is that refugees have clung to that straw of hope in a desperate situation, like the Jews kept saying, "Next year in Jerusalem" for centuries. I would not pretend that the matter is easy to sort out.

I agree that Arab political culture has been autocratic, although sometimes that makes trust easier in negotiations. Sadat (and then Mubarak) held up their end of the deal between Egypt and Israel, though their autocratic ways may have fed the anti-Israeli sentiment of the Muslim Brotherhood. Jordan's autocracy probably made their peace deal with Israel possible. I tend to think of autocracy as a stage in cultural development, rather than a characteristic of particular cultures.

Robert Tulip wrote:
To liken Israel’s security situation to extremist propaganda and rhetoric is profoundly unrealistic. Broad Arab hatred towards Israel necessitates a hard line. Israel has the capacity to drag the Middle East into the modern world, if Islamists can somehow be inspired to abandon their anti-Semitism. Christianity has an important role with its theology of forgiveness and reconciliation.

I don't have illusions about Israel's security situation, but Netanyahu does. Peace would be the best thing to happen to Israel's security, precisely because it would allow Israel to act in concert with Arabs and bring the benefits of prosperity to people too long oppressed and impoverished by exploitative leadership. Rabin was working on a strategy of gradual transition to Palestinian sovereignty, and it would have been accepted and it would have worked, except the Israeli extremists could not accept giving up their dream of Greater Israel.
Robert Tulip wrote:
Harry Marks wrote:
But then, that is the ace that extremists keep in the hole - the more they provoke, the more the equally short-sighted response gives them credibility. So far American Jews have been, in my opinion, exceedingly patient and far-sighted.
It will be interesting to see the extent to which Zionist over-reach undermines Western support for Israel. Your description of the ‘ace in the hole’ looks a bit fanciful, like Trump believing that his lies increase his support by undermining the concept of public truth. Such a hand can only go so far before the house of cards collapses as the ace turns out to be a two of spades.
Well, in the Brave New World of Red State vs. Blue State, Dear Leader's provocation and prevarication could be said to be working. Divisiveness does tend to lead people to take sides. I tend to agree that extremism is not a far-sighted strategy, and that it undermines its own credibility, but given a realpolitik with a high degree of fear on each side, and a rough balance of ability to inflict pain, extremism has excellent chances of getting its hands on the reins of power. It's just a matter of convincing those on it's "side" to be afraid, be very afraid.



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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Treason: Docs PROVE Deep State hacks Obama, Comey, Brennan, and Clapper aided Russian efforts to divide Americans with ‘Spygate’
A re-cap of various crimes committed by Obama and his people.
thenationalsentinel.com/2019/05/17/trea ... h-spygate/

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Trump Tells Reporters Just How Far His Declassification Goes: ‘We Are Exposing Everything’
...Now, the “lack of transparency” narrative has once again fallen on its face. ... As part of his push to shine a light on what happened before and after the 2016 election, Trump announced Friday that he would provide unprecedented public access to documents connected to the “Russian collusion” claims leveled against him. ... “We want to be very transparent, so as you know, I declassified everything, everything they want,” Trump told reporters, according to Fox News. “We are exposing everything.”
yourdestinationnow.com/2019/05/trump-te ... r-his.html

Trump on Barr declassify authority: ‘Let’s see what he finds’ (3:00 video)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqTdwruOJJo

Mueller: A Journey To The Dark Side
A 36:00 minute video by a constitutional lawyer. He scratches the surface of Mueller's seedy career as a Washington fixer (for both 'sides' of our two-party system), then later in the video he goes into the history of the Church Committee and the establishment of FISA courts. A very good presentation.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOxryE0SRnk

Deep state desperation: A false flag is their last remaining option to save themselves from being exposed and destroyed
Just four days ago, President Trump ordered the declassification of “bucket five” documents which will show how Obama’s FBI and DOJ actively conspired to commit treason against the Trump administration through illegal spying, FISA court fraud, planting spies and more. ... This is the beginning of the end for the treasonous, criminal deep state under which America has suffered for far too long, spanning multiple presidential administrations including Obama, Bush and Clinton. ... Now, the deep state finds itself at “maximum desperation,” and it is going to trigger every last-ditch tactic it still has remaining in order to try to save itself....
governmentslaves.news/2019/05/26/deep-s ... destroyed/

The last piece isn't hyperbolic. The Washington rats who've served the globalists for decades are in panic mode. Their illegal acts were supposed to be kept secret by President Hillary, but now Trump is declassifying everything he can about their crimes. So they need diversions. They'll keep the Russia hoax on life support as long as they can, then they'll sponsor riots...who knows what all. They're looking at convictions for capital crimes, so they're liable to do anything. Don't enable them.

And Europe is rebelling. Last week was a good one for nationalists there. They're trying to throw off the Fourth Reich's yoke. My favorite video about Brexit. 1:27 minutes long:

BURGER KING BREXIT
youtube.com/watch?v=yGL-XJPuCuo&fea ... e=youtu.be


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Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:05 pm
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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
KindaSkolarly wrote:
now Trump is declassifying everything he can about their crimes.

You can safely bet your entire life savings that Trump will follow Devin Nunes in declassifying only the information he thinks is helpful to his side. Yet another chunk of objective standards pissed upon by the Human Wrecking Ball and his cronies.

I wonder if Kinda Skolarly has any interest in explaining McConnell's marital connection to Chinese business, and its implication for the rest of us.



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Wed Jun 05, 2019 4:14 pm
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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
Europe isn't rebelling against anything, and it certainly wasn't a good week for the nationalist or fascist parties: they did not gain any ground and were trounced where it really mattered. The shift is back to the Centre Left (Denmark is a good example) and even the Italian Govt has had enough of Bannon and is closing down his "academy". It's important to have the correct information and analysis in order to take part in political discussion.



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Harry Marks, Interbane
Sun Jun 09, 2019 10:34 am
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Post Re: The Coup against Donald Trump
vizitelly wrote:
That is true, Johnson did have a shot at leading the Tory Party, but the system is robust. He will probably try again, but he is not popular within the party so will most likely not gain that position. The Tories have always preferred what they refer to as 'a safe pair of hands' and Johnson is far from that.


Sadly, this seems not to be applying.



Sat Jul 06, 2019 11:22 am
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