Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Feb 24, 2018 3:10 pm





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
Should welfare recipients be drug tested? 

Should welfare recipients be drug tested?
Yes 18%  18%  [ 2 ]
No 82%  82%  [ 9 ]
Total votes : 11

Should welfare recipients be drug tested? 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Owner
Diamond Contributor 3

Joined: May 2002
Posts: 15715
Location: Florida
Thanks: 3261
Thanked: 1214 times in 959 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)
Highscores: 6

 Should welfare recipients be drug tested?
Should welfare recipients be drug tested?

I saw this question over at Debate.org and thought I'd see what you guys have to say. Please vote and then add an explanation as to why you are either for or against drug testing welfare recipients.



Thu Dec 14, 2017 11:42 pm
Profile Email WWW
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 5940
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1543
Thanked: 1652 times in 1283 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Should welfare recipients be drug tested?
I see blanket drug testing for TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) recipients as too intrusive. I read that in some states a requirement for testing has been challenged as unconstitutional. If there is reason to suspect drug/alcohol abuse, I wouldn't object to testing. However, in states where recreational use of marijuana is legal, throwing people off TANF for having indulged doesn't really make sense. Although it's absurd to condone welfare recipients using their government money to buy weed or any drug, including alcohol, a positive test only shows they've used.

We need to have programs to help TANF people get jobs that pay living wages, or at least give them the prospect of earning more than minimum wage if they persevere. Families can't make it on $7.25 per hour. In general, TANF means there is only one wage earner in the family. TANF doesn't last indefinitely, either; I think all states must place limits on the length of time that benefits are received.

Bill Clinton made welfare a much less easy ride with his reforms during his first term.



The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
Chris OConnor
Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:26 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I Amaze Even Myself

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 1862
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Thanks: 56
Thanked: 637 times in 496 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Should welfare recipients be drug tested?
IIRC - without googling - at least two states have tried drug testing welfare recipients (Florida & Wisconsin?). The hit rate if you will was something like 0.2% which translates to a large waste of money.

- Most people who receive welfare actually work. Probably a significant portion of those employers require drug testing.
- If you kick folks off welfare for a positive drug result, where do they go?
- Check out the following article.

Quote:
A journey through a land of extreme poverty: welcome to America
The UN’s Philip Alston is an expert on deprivation – and he wants to know why 41m Americans are living in poverty. The Guardian joined him on a special two-week mission into the dark heart of the world’s richest nation

So begins a two-week journey into the dark side of the American Dream. The spotlight of the UN monitor, an independent arbiter of human rights standards across the globe, has fallen on this occasion on the US, culminating on Friday with the release of his initial report in Washington. His fact-finding mission into the richest nation the world has ever known has led him to investigate the tragedy at its core: the 41 million people who officially live in poverty. Of those, nine million have zero cash income – they do not receive a cent in sustenance.

Alston’s epic journey has taken him from coast to coast, deprivation to deprivation. Starting in LA and San Francisco, sweeping through the Deep South, traveling on to the colonial stain of Puerto Rico then back to the stricken coal country of West Virginia, he has explored the collateral damage of America’s reliance on private enterprise to the exclusion of public help.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/201 ... rapporteur

Here's a 4.5 minute interview with Philip Alston, the United Nations' special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. Aired today.
https://www.npr.org/2017/12/15/57119994 ... vulnerable



Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:49 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5435
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1950
Thanked: 1858 times in 1413 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Should welfare recipients be drug tested?
There are better ways to reduce illegal drug use than a punitive drug test regime targeted at the poor.

Australia is trialling a cashless debit card that can be used for essential goods but not to get cash, alcohol or gambling.

And sewerage tests reveal the location and scale of drug use.

There are already far too many people in jail in the USA, and kicking people off welfare tends to increase crime and imprisonment, I suspect, with overall much more negative impact than drug use. There are overall better ways to reduce drug use among the poor than a welfare crackdown.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
DWill, Litwitlou
Sat Dec 16, 2017 6:20 am
Profile Email WWW
All Your Posts are Belong to Us!


Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 65
Location: Texas
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 26 times in 22 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Should welfare recipients be drug tested?
If recipients of public money are to be tested, then we should start with politicians.



The following user would like to thank KindaSkolarly for this post:
Chris OConnor, DWill
Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:46 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membership
Quantity AND Quality


Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 691
Thanks: 32
Thanked: 368 times in 289 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Should welfare recipients be drug tested?
Drug testing welfare recipients lays into the stereotype that people on welfare are all drug-addled cheaters too lazy to work. The result, that they've netted virtually no one in these stings disproves the stereotype and that bothers the conservatives way more than these people doing drugs.



Sat Feb 17, 2018 6:59 pm
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

BookTalk.org Newsletter 



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
How To Promote Your Book

Featured Books

Books by New Authors


*

FACTS is a select group of active BookTalk.org members passionate about promoting Freethought, Atheism, Critical Thinking and Science.

Apply to join FACTS
See who else is in FACTS







BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2017. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank