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Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15) 
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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
The promise was broken, but of course through no fault of the narrator's. I think he would have come away with something if he could have, but he just didn't have enough dough to buy any of the wares he sees. The English have defeated the poor Irish again.

Do you know what the color brown means in the story, if anything? "The other houses of the street, conscious of decent lives within them, gazed at one another with brown imperturbable faces." Mangan's sister also wears brown.



Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:52 am
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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
Yes, a post has been made regarding his poetry. Not in this thread but in another.



Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:05 pm
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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
President Camacho wrote:
Yes, a post has been made regarding his poetry. Not in this thread but in another.

Sorry, seems I missed it.



Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:51 pm
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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
Saffron wrote:
President Camacho wrote:
Yes, a post has been made regarding his poetry. Not in this thread but in another.

Sorry, seems I missed it.

I don't know why his poetry came up now. I had mentioned that I thought Joyce's published poetry was far less daring and impressive than the poetic passages in his stories. That was in the beginning of the "Sisters" thread.



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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
I'm only starting Araby tonight. Of the first 3 stories in this book which is your favorite so far?



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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
Of the first three, I think I liked The Sisters the best, but they're all quite good. I find that one of the qualities of great literature is ambiguity. The author leaves a lot of room for individual interpretation. Hemingway used an iceberg as a metaphor for what gets left unsaid. All these stories lend themselves to discussion for this very reason.

I've had a couple of busy days, but I'll be back here soon to discuss more Joyce stories. Glad to see you on board, Chris.


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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
Of the first two stories I think preferred "An Encounter." I'm enjoying his writing style immensely.



Mon Apr 08, 2013 9:41 pm
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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
Chris OConnor wrote:
Of the first two stories I think preferred "An Encounter." I'm enjoying his writing style immensely.

I like all 3, but this is my favorite of the three. I am also enjoying Joyce's writing style. Glad to see you posting, Chris.



Tue Apr 09, 2013 8:32 am
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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
DWill wrote:
The promise was broken, but of course through no fault of the narrator's. I think he would have come away with something if he could have, but he just didn't have enough dough to buy any of the wares he sees. The English have defeated the poor Irish again.

Do you know what the color brown means in the story, if anything? "The other houses of the street, conscious of decent lives within them, gazed at one another with brown imperturbable faces." Mangan's sister also wears brown.


In the posthumously published autobiographical novel, Stephen Hero, Joyce himself notes 'one of those brown brick houses which seem the very incarnation of Irish paralysis.' (Thanks, footnotes). Thus, brown seems to represent bleakness, devoid of possibility. As you say even the people are brown. The state of paralysis is familiar to those born in poverty. They simply don't try to do better for themselves, they cannot even really conceive of it.

In "Araby" the narrator is given a florin to spend at the bazaar. The Penguin edition says a florin is worth two shillings which for the boy would have been an "awe-inspiring sum." With the theme of paralysis in these stories, it makes sense that the boy did, in fact, have enough money for one of the vases, but his own hesitation and sense of shame caused him to miss the opportunity. He who hesitates is lost. Certainly the saleswoman at the booth doesn't seem inclined to think the boy could afford anything. She merely asks if he wants help out of sense of duty. The shop is about to close up and she's busy chatting it up with two English gentleman. So she misses out on an opportunity as well.


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Post Re: Dubliners - "Araby" (Story 3 of 15)
Wow. Here it is 2014 and I'm reading these posts. It's nice to share the environment here with other readers of Joyce. I just read The Dubliners in September (2014), and enjoyed it. I really like the way Joyce describes things. It sticks with you. The beauty of his writing is that you're not conscious of it being writing, because the imagery is so well done. "While she spoke she turned a silver bracelet round and round her wrist." That one sentence says so much, about him (the boy), about her, about the relationship, and about the visual moment. Thank you all for sharing (even though so long ago).
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