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MARCH: Time

#124: Oct. - Dec. 2013 (Non-Fiction)
DaveJeb
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Re: MARCH: Time

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Heledd, I also just downloaded Leaves of Grass and look forward to reading it for the first time, although I think this is a book I should read in book format rather than an ebook.
I was surprised to read that Moscow is selling forests to the Chinese, deforestation in Siberia was something I had never considered.
I am still struggling with this book. The lines about luxury being a crossing of a line beyond which all suffering ceases - I think all suffering ceases only upon death. Am i just not getting his message or he is trying to hard to be deep?
His trip to the island was an amazing feat, especially in -27 F: never been that cold thankfully. But I related to being out on the ice with a silence rarely experienced. It is a gift, the ability to get time away from the sounds of civilization. Most of us have gotten so accustom to the sounds of planes overhead, cars roaring or honking, train whistles, kids and dogs, sirens, radios, etcetera ad nauseum, that our brains automatically filter much of them out. Then to stand after a long snowshoe walk in total silence. To see the sky and trees without distraction. It is one of the things I look forward to most in winter.
I loved the impromptu picnic on the frozen lake, it seemed so natural, that out in this semi-isolation, they all wanted a chance for conviviality. I wished I was there with Natalie she seems always ready for a party. It was funny and realistic the topics of conversation focus on the issues vital to their situation - weather, animal tracks etc. What a relief that topics like interest rates, politics, crime stats and doctor appointments fade in relevance.
Just as I am getting into sync with Tesson, he writes how the forests have no transformation without history, without an echo. I disagree, I find forests change, not drastically, but each year brings a new ring of history to trees, lightning rips a towering tree in half it changes light patterns for new growth and homes for birds and animals, bear claws and antler rubbings mark trees and show natures travels. I find natures indifference toward me a relief, I am not the only species on this planet, not even the most powerful.
On to March!
Bookish
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