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Part Three, Chapters I–II (1 - 2) 
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 Part Three, Chapters I–II (1 - 2)
Part Three, Chapters I–II (1 - 2)

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Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:58 pm
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Post Re: Part Three, Chapters I–II (1 - 2)
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Fri Oct 19, 2012 8:20 pm
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Post Re: Part Three, Chapters I–II (1 - 2)
Part 3 Ch 1


Quote:
But close before her, rising on a slender granite column from a ledge below to the level of her eyes, blinding her by its glare, dimming the rest, stood a dollar sign three feet tall, made of solid gold. It hung in space above the town, as its coat-of-arms, its trademark, its beacon— and it caught the sunrays, like some transmitter of energy that sent them in shining blessing to stretch horizontally through the air above the roofs.



Quote:
She looked at her plate, bitterly, almost as if she were afraid to touch it. “It’s the most expensive breakfast I’ll ever eat, considering the value of the cook’s time and of all those others.”
“Yes— from one aspect. But from another, it’s the cheapest breakfast you’ll ever eat— because no part of it has gone to feed the looters who’ll make you pay for it through year after year and leave you to starve in the end.”
After a long silence, she asked simply, almost wistfully, “What is it that you’re all doing here?”
“Living.”


That’s what parasites can do to hosts. But what happens when they run out of hosts (victims)? We are seeing that in the novel. They can’t, or don’t want to live on their own, so they live off of others achievements. That last line reminds me of Rand’s first novel We The Living. Anyone else read that one?

Quote:
Here, we trade achievements, not failures— values, not needs. We’re free of one another, yet we all grow together.


Grow together as independents.

Quote:
she knew that there was no meaning in motors or factories or trains, that their only meaning was in man’s enjoyment of his life, which they served— and that her swelling admiration at the sight of an achievement was for the man from whom it came, for the power and the radiant vision within him which had seen the earth as a place of enjoyment and had known that the work of achieving one’s happiness was the purpose, the sanction and the meaning of life.


And one should have the right to pursue such happiness in one’s own life.

And now John Galt says that they are all on strike. This is an important passage in the book:

Quote:
There is only one kind of men who have never been on strike in human history. Every other kind and class have stopped, when they so wished, and have presented demands to the world, claiming to be indispensable— except the men who have carried the world on their shoulders, have kept it alive, have endured torture as sole payment, but have never walked out on the human race. Well, their turn has come. Let the world discover who they are, what they do and what happens when they refuse to function. This is the strike of the men of the mind, Miss Taggart. This is the mind on strike.


Quote:
They are counting on you to go on, to work to the limit of the inhuman and to feed them while you last— and when you collapse, there will be another victim starting out and feeding them, while struggling to survive— and the span of each succeeding victim will be shorter, and while you’ll die to leave them a railroad, your last descendant-in-spirit will die to leave them a loaf of bread. This does not worry the looters of the moment. Their plan— like all the plans of all the royal looters of the past— is only that the loot shall last their lifetime. It has always lasted before, because in one generation they could not run out of victims. But this time— it will not last. The victims are on strike.


Some of the strikers, you hear their reasons for going on strike, these are my favorites of the lot:

Quote:
“I quit and joined him and went on strike,” said Hugh Akston, “because I could not share my profession with men who claim that the qualification of an intellectual consists of denying the existence of the intellect. People would not employ a plumber who’d attempt to prove his professional excellence by asserting that there’s no such thing as plumbing— but, apparently, the same standards of caution are not considered necessary in regard to philosophers.


Quote:
“I quit,” said Ellis Wyatt, “because I didn’t wish to serve as the cannibals’ meal and to do the cooking, besides.”


Recall - From each according to his ability, to each according to his need… This is the men of ability going on strike.


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Sun Nov 11, 2012 2:01 pm
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Post Re: Part Three, Chapters I–II (1 - 2)
Part 3 Ch. 2

Here we come upon Frisco arriving at the valley, and during the convo, these are very important parts:

Quote:
Dagny, when I took over my father’s business, when I began to deal with the whole industrial system of the world, it was then that I began to see the nature of the evil I had suspected, but thought too monstrous to believe. I saw the tax-collecting vermin that had grown for centuries like mildew on d’Anconia Copper, draining us by no right that anyone could name— I saw the government regulations passed to cripple me, because I was successful, and to help my competitors, because they were loafing failures— I saw the labor unions who won every claim against me, by reason of my ability to make their livelihood possible— I saw that any man’s desire for money he could not earn was regarded as a righteous wish, but if he earned it, it was damned as greed— I saw the politicians who winked at me, telling me not to worry, because I could just work a little harder and outsmart them all. I looked past the profits of the moment, and I saw that the harder I worked, the more I tightened the noose around my throat, I saw that my energy was being poured down a sewer, that the parasites who fed on me were being fed upon in their turn, that they were caught in their own trap— and that there was no reason for it, no answer known to anyone, that the sewer pipes of the world, draining its productive blood, led into some dank fog nobody had dared to pierce, while people merely shrugged and said that life on earth could be nothing but evil.


Quote:
Sebastián d’Anconia committed one error: he accepted a system which declared that the property he had earned by right, was to be his, not by right, but by permission. His descendants paid for that error. I have made the last payment. . . . I think that I will see the day when, growing out from their root in this soil, the mines, the smelters, the ore docks of d’Anconia Copper will spread again through the world and down to my native country, and I will be the first to start my country’s rebuilding. I may see it, but I cannot be certain. No man can predict the time when others will choose to return to reason. It may be that at the end of my life, I shall have established nothing but this single mine— d’Anconia Copper No. 1, Galt’s Gulch, Colorado, U.S.A. But, Dagny, do you remember that my ambition was to double my father’s production of copper? Dagny, if at the end of my life, I produce but one pound of copper a year, I will be richer than my father, richer than all my ancestors with all their thousands of tons— because that one pound will be mine by right and will be used to maintain a world that knows it!



I’d like to focus on this passage in the novel, in regards to motherhood, because I think it is important to note a few things about it:

Quote:
The recaptured sense of her own childhood kept coming back to her whenever she met the two sons of the young woman who owned the bakery shop. She often saw them wandering down the trails of the valley— two fearless beings, aged seven and four. They seemed to face life as she had faced it. They did not have the look she had seen in the children of the outer world— a look of fear, half-secretive, half-sneering, the look of a child’s defense against an adult, the look of a being in the process of discovering that he is hearing lies and of learning to feel hatred. The two boys had the open, joyous, friendly confidence of kittens who do not expect to get hurt, they had an innocently natural, non-boastful sense of their own value and as innocent a trust in any stranger’s ability to recognize it, they had the eager curiosity that would venture anywhere with the certainty that life held nothing unworthy of or closed to discovery, and they looked as if, should they encounter malevolence, they would reject it contemptuously, not as dangerous, but as stupid, they would not accept it in bruised resignation as the law of existence. “They represent my particular career, Miss Taggart,” said the young mother in answer to her comment, wrapping a loaf of fresh bread and smiling at her across the counter. “They’re the profession I’ve chosen to practice, which, in spite of all the guff about motherhood, one can’t practice successfully in the outer world. I believe you’ve met my husband, he’s the teacher of economics who works as linesman for Dick McNamara. You know, of course, that there can be no collective commitments in this valley and that families or relatives are not allowed to come here, unless each person takes the striker’s oath by his own independent conviction. I came here, not merely for the sake of my husband’s profession, but for the sake of my own. I came here in order to bring up my sons as human beings. I would not surrender them to the educational systems devised to stunt a child’s brain, to convince him that reason is impotent, that existence is an irrational chaos with which he’s unable to deal, and thus reduce him to a state of chronic terror. You marvel at the difference between my children and those outside, Miss Taggart? Yet the cause is so simple. The cause is that here, in Galt’s Gulch, there’s no person who would not consider it monstrous ever to confront a child with the slightest suggestion of the irrational.”


What a great mother, and wife.

You can read more about Rand’s thoughts on education in her article “The Comprachico’s” where she was very passionate in regards to a child’s proper education and their minds. Her philosophy has been applied to educational theory, and it is arguably the best approaches ever to come to education. This is something you can decide for yourself, if you would like to educate yourself more in regards to it.

Lisa VanDamme, VanDamme Academy, who applies such an approach:
http://www.vandammeacademy.com/

See the writings of Lisa VanDamme:
http://www.theobjectivestandard.com/con ... ndamme.asp
http://capitalismmagazine.com/author/LisaVanDamme/

Lisa VanDamme’s blog, Pedagogically Correct:
http://www.pedagogicallycorrect.com/

See Leonard Peikoff’s lecture, The Philosophy of Education:
https://estore.aynrand.org/p/64/philoso ... 3-download


_________________
"Better to write for yourself and have no public, than to write for the public and have no self."
- Cyril Connolly

My seven published books are available for purchase, click here:
http://www.amazon.com/Steven-L.-Sheppard/e/B00E6KOX12


Sun Nov 11, 2012 2:07 pm
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