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What song is stuck in your head today?

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Saffron
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Just an idea, but when you post a song how about a link to it or a few lines of lyrics so we, the readers, know what you are about.
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Kevin
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Henry Cow covering a Phil Ochs song. As an added bonus during the introductory comments we can hear a band member learning French-on-the-fly. A wonderful performance of a top rate song, as far as I'm concerned.
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chrissy4
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The love of my life has had "Somebody that I Used to Know" stuck in his head and now it is stuck in mine. Though, whenever I sing it in front of him I change the lyrics to "I reeeeeally neeeeed your love!"
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deathscythe210
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mikhailparaskan wrote:dont cry for me argentina :) somehow I think about it today :)
ironic, i was just watching Evita earlier today lol.

but the song that's stuck in my head today "Black Cat" by Janet Jackson

black cat, nine lives
shoirt days, long nights!
livin' on the edge not afraid to die~
Last edited by deathscythe210 on Mon Jun 04, 2012 2:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Rajesh
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“Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;
Life and these lips have long been separated:
Death lies on her like an untimely frost
Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.”
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Cattleman
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I guess because tomorrow is Independence Day here in the U.S., the song of the day (for me) is "God Bless the U.S.A."
Love what you do, and do what you love. Don't listen to anyone else who tells you not to do it. -Ray Bradbury

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done, and why. Then do it. -Robert A. Heinlein
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Penelope
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Happy Independence Day!!
We'll let you have your Independence, but no sharp objects!!!

Excerpt from todays newspaper which I hope you will enjoy:-


Cricket and other baffling British habits

I have spent two-thirds of my life in Britain, and am steeped in its ways. But some things here still leave me stumped



Last weekend, I went to the cricket. Are you laughing yet? Try reading it again but in an unshakable American accent, for that is how it sounded coming out of my mouth. See? Crazy times.

It was, in fact, my second time going to a cricket match, having been taken last year to the Oval by a colleague on the Guardian's sports desk who simply could not believe I had somehow made it into my fourth decade without ever hearing the thwack of willow on leather. I might have known the cliches but I sure didn't know the rules and by the end of the first over I think my colleague was regretting his hospitality because later that week a column appeared under his byline about how annoying it is to bring Americans to cricket matches because they ask so many damn questions.

What I mainly learned, though, was that, contrary to my hopes, one cannot grasp the rules of cricket through osmosis. No, nor through flinty if squinty-eyed observation neither. So instead of talking knowledgably about wickets and stats, as I fully imagined myself doing by the fourth hour, the whole experience was somewhat akin to the (one) time I went to an opera: beautiful, to watch, rather elegant, to observe but utterly, utterly incomprehensible to me.

Despite what the stubbornly unshakable accent suggests, I have lived in this country for almost two-thirds of my life now and have recently moved back after a few years spent in my hometown of New York. It was during that time that I realised how British – well, English, really – I am now. I eat Marmite for breakfast, I can talk for hours about the weather and I am positively fluent in the language of self-deprecation (arguably too much so: one evening in New York a friend asked about my work, my personal life and a book I was working on. Naturally, like any good English person, I casually replied they were all a complete disaster. She phoned, her voice heavy with solicitous concern, the next day with the number for a therapist as she thought I was "clinically depressed".) However, there are certain things other than cricket rules that I suspect I will never understand.

A. Resentment of America

Now, on the one hand, of course I do understand this. The relationship between Britain and America, from Britain's perspective, has always reminded me of the one between Frasier Crane and his brother Niles: there's the big, brassy, embarrassing, famous and attention-seeking brother who hogs the spotlight, and then there's the smaller, sharper, more self-aware and overly self-conscious brother who is both scornful of his sibling's shallow fame but also faintly jealous of it and hides the latter beneath snarky jibes. Of course I get it: having lived in America and Britain I can see all too well how America's cheerful, unabashed tendencies towards arrogance, superficiality and shameless ambition grate against Britain's preference for self-effacement, awkwardness and grim failure. What I don't get is why folk in Britain bother getting wound up about it. Any hint of an American tradition coming to Britain – high-school proms, Daily Show-a-like nightly talkshow, will.i.am – and Radio 4 programmes and newspaper articles sprout up most self-righteously debating whether America is "taking over British culture". Come on, Britain, you're better than this. Make like Niles and take out your handkerchief, wipe away the germs and walk on past. It'll probably go away soon.

B. Happy tolerance of physical discomfort

Camping. Music festivals. Beach holidays. Britain, you don't have the climate for any of these things, as well you know, considering how much time you spend marvelling at your weather. Why do you insist on doing these things in such miserably inclement conditions? Have you never heard of making life easy on yourselves? Just give it up.

C. Certain elements of the pop culture

By and large, I probably do prefer British pop music to American but I'll never understand the weird British sentimentality for boring guitar rock (see: Paul Weller, Oasis, Kasabian, the Verve). I'm not saying American music doesn't have its problems (one word: Nickelback) but Chad Kroeger doesn't garner the unquestioning adulatory press that Weller does.

And, this is a side note, really, but what was with all the long TV show titles in the 1990s? Whose Line Is It Anyway?, Drop the Dead Donkey, Have I Got News For You? Was it to compensate for the paucity of your TV channels? I've always wondered that.
by Hadley Freeman - my favourite young lady journalist!
Only those become weary of angling who bring nothing to it but the idea of catching fish.

He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad....

Rafael Sabatini
youkrst
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Aaron Copland's fanfare for the common man

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cr6CnG5dmvM

we know he deserves one.

the Ladies of course deserve an entire symphony :lol:
Last edited by youkrst on Wed Jul 04, 2012 11:04 pm, edited 3 times in total.
youkrst
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I'm not saying American music doesn't have its problems (one word: Nickelback) but Chad Kroeger doesn't garner the unquestioning adulatory press that Weller does.
:lol:

i suppose technically they are canadian (oh the shame), i cant imagine any music loving nation wanting to adopt them, except as an example of how not to do it.

hehe
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Penelope
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I adore that Aaron Copeland piece too, but it's Freddie Mercury singing 'I Want to Break Free' for me today..... :o
Only those become weary of angling who bring nothing to it but the idea of catching fish.

He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad....

Rafael Sabatini
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Penelope
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OK - I've changed the record:-

It's Marc Bolan - We love to Boogie....inane but much more positive:- :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3bPshSlQMo
Only those become weary of angling who bring nothing to it but the idea of catching fish.

He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad....

Rafael Sabatini
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Cattleman
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Thanks, yourkst, for mentioning Copland. My favorties by him are pieces from two of his ballets: "Hoedown" from "Rodeo," and "Simple Gifts" from "Applachian Spring." :)

I am listening to "Simple Gifts" as I write this. :D

Sorry, I don't know how to link the website here. :(
Love what you do, and do what you love. Don't listen to anyone else who tells you not to do it. -Ray Bradbury

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done, and why. Then do it. -Robert A. Heinlein
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Penelope
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Cattleman, Do you know 'Lord of the Dance'?

These are the words we sing in our churches to the 'Simple Gifts' tune. I used to like singing this one and I rather miss it:-

Sydney Carter
Lord Of The Dance

I danced in the morning when the world was begun
I danced in the Moon & the Stars & the Sun
I came down from Heaven & I danced on Earth
At Bethlehem I had my birth:

Dance then, wherever you may be
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He!
And I'll lead you all, wherever you may be
And I'll lead you all in the Dance, said He!

I danced for the scribe & the pharisee
But they would not dance & they wouldn't follow me
I danced for fishermen, for James & John
They came with me & the Dance went on:

Dance then, wherever you may be
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He!
And I'll lead you all, wherever you may be
And I'll lead you all in the Dance, said He!

I danced on the Sabbath & I cured the lame
The holy people said it was a shame!
They whipped & they stripped & they hung me high
And they left me there on a cross to die!

Dance then, wherever you may be
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He!
And I'll lead you all, wherever you may be
And I'll lead you all in the Dance, said He!
(...lead you all in the Dance, said He!)

I danced on a Friday when the sky turned black
It's hard to dance with the devil on your back
They buried my body & they thought I'd gone
But I am the Dance & I still go on!

Dance then, wherever you may be
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He!
And I'll lead you all, wherever you may be
And I'll lead you all in the Dance, said He!
(...lead you all in the Dance, said He!)

They cut me down and I leapt up high
I am the Life that'll never, never die!
I'll live in you if you'll live in Me -
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He!

Dance then, wherever you may be
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He!
And I'll lead you all, wherever you may be
And I'll lead you all in the Dance, said He!
Only those become weary of angling who bring nothing to it but the idea of catching fish.

He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad....

Rafael Sabatini
youkrst
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i love that one too Penelope, it really speaks to the true meaning of the metaphor.

here is simple gifts

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiLTwtuBi-o

what a feeling, dancing on the ceiling

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XxshEdcfAM

oh yeah, you cant keep a good man down, for long.

here's to death and resurrection.

and a little irreverant humour.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFl9TOKzL7I
youkrst
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heres one for Thoreau, JJ Rousseau and Cattleman.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVl1ibyk ... re=related
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