Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Mon Oct 14, 2019 1:40 am





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
Moby Dick Chapter 40 Midnight Forecastle, Harpooneers and Sailors 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5813
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2268
Thanked: 2197 times in 1664 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Moby Dick Chapter 40 Midnight Forecastle, Harpooneers and Sailors
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2701/270 ... m#2HCH0040

This one shows the multicultural nature of whaling.

It features a song used in Jaws


A full version of the Spanish Ladies song is at


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Last edited by Robert Tulip on Sun Apr 29, 2012 12:18 am, edited 1 time in total.



The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
Saffron
Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:07 am
Profile Email WWW
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6317
Location: Luray, Virginia
Thanks: 1828
Thanked: 2007 times in 1523 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 40 Midnight Forecastle, Harpooneers and Sailors
Just by the way, you're doing a bang-up DL job here, Robert. The music tie-in is apt, as this chapter will be great in Lloyd Webber's musical "Moby," should he ever get such an idea. Imagine a "motley crew" of mostly swarthy sailors gamboliing and singing over decks and riggings. A whaling ship is a veritable UN. Some of the characters refer to their gods and goddesses, which makes us see how Ish came by his broad-mindedness in religion. It's all fine with our author; I think we can justifiably say that Melville is of the "all religions are one" school of thought.



Last edited by DWill on Sat Apr 28, 2012 6:58 am, edited 1 time in total.



The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
Robert Tulip
Sat Apr 28, 2012 6:58 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2950
Location: Leesburg, VA
Thanks: 477
Thanked: 394 times in 300 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 40 Midnight Forecastle, Harpooneers and Sailors
In the Washington DC area The Washington Revels put on a program each year of sea shanties - I've been tempted many times to go to hear them.




Sat Apr 28, 2012 7:11 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 5813
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 2268
Thanked: 2197 times in 1664 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 40 Midnight Forecastle, Harpooneers and Sailors
DWill wrote:
Just by the way, you're doing a bang-up DL job here, Robert. The music tie-in is apt, as this chapter will be great in Lloyd Webber's musical "Moby," should he ever get such an idea. Imagine a "motley crew" of mostly swarthy sailors gamboliing and singing over decks and riggings. A whaling ship is a veritable UN. Some of the characters refer to their gods and goddesses, which makes us see how Ish came by his broad-mindedness in religion. It's all fine with our author; I think we can justifiably say that Melville is of the "all religions are one" school of thought.

A book by Australian historian Geoffrey Blainey, The Tyranny of Distance, is about how Australian history was shaped in the nineteenth century by the long clipper voyage to England, including the figure 8 great circle route around Antarctica.

Blainey discusses whaling as the first global industry, prefiguring modern globalisation.

This chapter of Moby Dick, setting out the many diverse nationalities aboard the Pequod, helps show the multicultural globalised nature of whaling.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


Sun Apr 29, 2012 12:17 am
Profile Email WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

Announcements 

• Promote Your Fiction Book on BookTalk.org
Sun Jul 30, 2017 7:33 pm

• Promote Your Non-Fiction Book on BookTalk.org
Sun Jul 30, 2017 7:18 pm



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
How To Promote Your Book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2019. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank