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Moby Dick Chapter 19 The Prophet 
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Post Moby Dick Chapter 19 The Prophet
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2701/270 ... m#2HCH0019

At this point, I wish to refer the reader to my commentary on The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:
Robert Tulip wrote:
This long poem by Coleridge is one of the greats. I’ve read it again now, available at http://www.online-literature.com/coleridge/646/ and would like to highlight some themes. It tells the story of how a ‘greybeard loon’ stops a wedding guest to tell him of his travels to the southern ocean. Please now, read the poem yourself, because I will summarise it. post84467.html#p84467

Now, I am quite sure that Mr Melville has read Coleridge as his inspiration for the following:
Quote:
"Shipmates, have ye shipped in that ship?"
Queequeg and I had just left the Pequod, and were sauntering away from the water, for the moment each occupied with his own thoughts, when the above words were put to us by a stranger, who, pausing before us, levelled his massive forefinger at the vessel in question. He was but shabbily apparelled in faded jacket and patched trowsers; a rag of a black handkerchief investing his neck. A confluent small-pox had in all directions flowed over his face, and left it like the complicated ribbed bed of a torrent, when the rushing waters have been dried up.
"Have ye shipped in her?" he repeated.

Melville's grey beard loon suggests that Ishmael and Queequeg have sold their soul to the devil, aka Captain Ahab.

Quote:
"Who's Old Thunder?" said I, again riveted with the insane earnestness of his manner.

"Captain Ahab."

And the great coleridgeanism
the Grey Bearded Loon wrote:
With finger pointed and eye levelled at the Pequod, the beggar-like stranger stood a moment, as if in a troubled reverie; then starting a little, turned and said:—"Ye've shipped, have ye? Names down on the papers? Well, well, what's signed, is signed; and what's to be, will be; and then again, perhaps it won't be, after all. Anyhow, it's all fixed and arranged a'ready; and some sailors or other must go with him, I suppose; as well these as any other men, God pity 'em! Morning to ye, shipmates, morning; the ineffable heavens bless ye; I'm sorry I stopped ye."


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Last edited by Robert Tulip on Fri Mar 23, 2012 6:55 am, edited 1 time in total.



Fri Mar 23, 2012 6:53 am
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Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 19 The Prophet
Some illustrations of Coleridge's grey beard loon, the type for the one whose glittering eye seizes Ishmael and Queequeg as they prepare to board the Pequod.

Image

Image


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