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Oregon's Access to Birth Control Act

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irishrosem

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Oregon's Access to Birth Control Act

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Today Oregon's Governor, Ted Kulongoski, signed the Access to Birth Control Act. According to the Governor's press release, the Act requires "employee health insurance plans to provide prescription drug coverage of birth control and emergency contraception be made available by hospital emergency rooms to victims of sexual assault." I actually intended to post this as good news...progress! Finally health insurance plans, at least Oregon's health insurance, are required to provide prescription coverage for birth control. How that has taken this long, I'll never know. This may not seem significant but, over the years, many women in this country have put out a lot of money buying birth control with no assistance from prescription plans. "Nearly half of all indemnity health insurance plans provide no coverage for prescription birth control
Rich206

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Re: Oregon's Access to Birth Control Act

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The paternalistic agenda of antiabortion groups is exposed by the fact they seek to limit access to birth control and Plan B. If they were really so concerned about the "sanctity of life" they would be in favor of limiting unwanted pregnancies, but their real goal has always been imposing their own moral agenda on all of society. This is the "barefoot and pregnant" viewpoint that sees sex as soley for procreation within marriage. It's always been about controlling people's behavior.I'm not sure I understand how the exemption works though. Since religious groups themselves are presumably not direct health care providers, does this mean companies like HMO's that provide health care plans for the employees of such groups can deny them coverage for prescription birth control? That would be a real shame, especially because some employees of religious organizations -- such as Catholic school teachers -- are poorly paid to begin with. Also, the exemption for non-profits probably covers a lot of HMOs I would think. Junk Drawer
irishrosem

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Re: Oregon's Access to Birth Control Act

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Come now, Rich, don't rain on my parade. Rich: Also, the exemption for non-profits probably covers a lot of HMOs I would think.I thought that too at first, but the nonprofit is listed as a subsection used to define "a 'religious employer.'" I'm assuming (hoping) that nonprofits under "6033(a)(2)(A)(i) or (iii)" do not include most HMOs. But I do think you're right, most religious school teachers, really any religious employees, are probably not covered by the Act. And this will also likely include all the employees for religious-based service organizations like the Salvation Army. Just another reason why government monies should not be going to these organizations.
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