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Official Poll - Mar. & April 2009 Fiction Book 
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Post Official Poll - Mar. & April 2009 Fiction Book
Official Poll - Mar. & April 2009 Fiction Book

This poll starts on Friday, February 20, 2009 and ends on Saturday the 28th of 2009. This gives us over 10 days to vote.

RULES:

You must have at least 25 total posts on our forums to vote so please don't cast a vote if you're not yet qualified. It doesn't take much time or energy to get up to 25 total posts.

Everyone is entitled to cast a total of 3 votes and these 3 votes can be distributed however the voter deems appropriate. Assign all 3 votes to just one of the book choices or break up the 3 votes based on your interest level in each book. If you don't assign all 3 votes we will assume you meant to assign all 3 of your votes to whatever book you picked. Actually, I will assume you didn't read these instructions. Hmm

There are 3 total choices on this poll. All were suggested by members. Your choices are as follows:

Drum roll please...



Last edited by Chris OConnor on Sun Mar 01, 2009 7:35 pm, edited 3 times in total.



Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:06 am
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BOOK 1:

The Satanic Verses: A Novel
by Salman Rushdie

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/081297 ... 0812976711

Amazon.com Review

No book in modern times has matched the uproar sparked by Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, which earned its author a death sentence. Furor aside, it is a marvelously erudite study of good and evil, a feast of language served up by a writer at the height of his powers, and a rollicking comic fable. The book begins with two Indians, Gibreel Farishta ("for fifteen years the biggest star in the history of the Indian movies") and Saladin Chamcha, a Bombay expatriate returning from his first visit to his homeland in 15 years, plummeting from the sky after the explosion of their jetliner, and proceeds through a series of metamorphoses, dreams and revelations. Rushdie's powers of invention are astonishing in this Whitbread Prize winner.


From Publishers Weekly

Banned in India before publication, this immense novel by Booker Prize-winner Rushdie ( Midnight's Children ) pits Good against Evil in a whimsical and fantastic tale. Two actors from India, "prancing" Gibreel Farishta and "buttony, pursed" Saladin Chamcha, are flying across the English Channel when the first of many implausible events occurs: the jet explodes. As the two men plummet to the earth, "like titbits of tobacco from a broken old cigar," they argue, sing and are transformed. When they are found on an English beach, the only survivors of the blast, Gibreel has sprouted a halo while Saladin has developed hooves, hairy legs and the beginnings of what seem like horns. What follows is a series of allegorical tales that challenges assumptions about both human and divine nature. Rushdie's fanciful language is as concentrated and overwhelming as a paisley pattern. Angels are demonic and demons are angelic as we are propelled through one illuminating episode after another. The narrative is somewhat burdened by self-consciousness that borders on preciosity, but for Rushdie fans this is a splendid feast.



Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:13 am
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BOOK 2:

My Ishmael
by Daniel Quinn

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/055337 ... 0553379658

From Kirkus Reviews
Another irresistible rant from Quinn, a sequel to his Turner Tomorrow Fellowship winner, Ishmael (1992), concerning a great, telepathic ape who dispenses ecological wisdom about the possible doom of humankind. Once more, Quinn focuses on the Leavers and Takers, his terms for the two basic, warring kinds of human sensibility. The planet's original inhabitants, the Leavers, were nomadic people who did no harm to the earth. The Takers, who have generally overwhelmed them, began as aggressive farmers obsessed with growth, were the builders of cities and empires, and have now, in the late 20th century, largely run out of space to monopolize. Quinn's books have not featured many memorable characters, aside from Ishmael. This time out, though, he invents a lively figure, 12-year-old Julie Gerchak, who is tough and wise beyond her years, having had to deal with a self-destructive, alcoholic mother. Julie responds to Ishmael's ad seeking a pupil with an earnest desire to save the world (a conceit carried over from the earlier novel). Once again, the gentle ape shares his wisdom in a series of questions and answers that resemble, in method, a blend of the Socratic dialogues and programmed learning. Moving beyond his theories about Leavers and Takers, Ishmael presents a detailed critique of educational systems around the world, suggesting that their function is not to usefully educate but to regulate the flow of workers into a Taker society. This is all very well, but what does Ishmael/Quinn suggest be done to redeem the Takers, and to save the earth? Quinn seems to want to sketch out how change might come about, but it's never fully explored. Instead, the novel is increasingly taken up with the mysteries surrounding Ishmael's travels and fate. This is the weakest of Quinn's novels, but his ideas are as thought-provoking as ever, even so.

Product Description
Winner of the Turner Tomorrow Fellowship, Daniel Quinn's Ishmael is an underground bestseller and a testament for a burgeoning spiritual movement. Now Quinn presents an extraordinary sequel, a companion novel so startlingly original that even Ishmael's most faithful readers will not predict its outcome....

When Ishmael places an advertisement for pupils with "an earnest desire to save the world," he does not expect a child to answer him. But twelve-year-old Julie Gerchak is undaunted by Ishmael's reluctance to teach someone so young, and convinces him to take her on as his next student. Ishmael knows he can't apply the same strategies with Julie that he used with his first pupil, Alan Lomax--nor can he hope for the same outcome. But young Julie proves that she is ready to forge her own spiritual path--and arrive at her own destination. And when the time comes to choose a pupil to carry out his greatest mission yet, Ishmael makes a daring decision--a choice that just might change the world.



Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:17 am
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BOOK 3:

The Picture of Dorian Gray
by Oscar Wilde

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/159308 ... 1593080255

Amazon.com Review
A lush, cautionary tale of a life of vileness and deception or a loving portrait of the aesthetic impulse run rampant? Why not both? After Basil Hallward paints a beautiful, young man's portrait, his subject's frivolous wish that the picture change and he remain the same comes true. Dorian Gray's picture grows aged and corrupt while he continues to appear fresh and innocent. After he kills a young woman, "as surely as if I had cut her little throat with a knife," Dorian Gray is surprised to find no difference in his vision or surroundings. "The roses are not less lovely for all that. The birds sing just as happily in my garden."

As Hallward tries to make sense of his creation, his epigram-happy friend Lord Henry Wotton encourages Dorian in his sensual quest with any number of Wildean paradoxes, including the delightful "When we are happy we are always good, but when we are good we are not always happy." But despite its many languorous pleasures, The Picture of Dorian Gray is an imperfect work. Compared to the two (voyeuristic) older men, Dorian is a bore, and his search for ever new sensations far less fun than the novel's drawing-room discussions. Even more oddly, the moral message of the novel contradicts many of Wilde's supposed aims, not least "no artist has ethical sympathies. An ethical sympathy in an artist is an unpardonable mannerism of style." Nonetheless, the glamour boy gets his just deserts. And Wilde, defending Dorian Gray, had it both ways: "All excess, as well as all renunciation, brings its own punishment."

[hr]



Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:21 am
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Alright....3 votes for Book 2 - My Ishmael

:book:



Fri Feb 20, 2009 2:17 am
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2 votes Satanic Verses
1 vote Dorian Gray



Fri Feb 20, 2009 11:28 am
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3 votes for satanic verses



Sun Feb 22, 2009 1:15 am
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I vote for Picture of Dorian Gray

Edit: You need 25+ posts to vote in book polls.

Chris



Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:20 am
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I vote for Dorian Gray.

Edit: You need 25+ posts to vote.

Chris



Tue Feb 24, 2009 4:38 pm
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I vote for Dorian Grey.

Edit: Ashleigh, please read the voting rules before voting. You get 3 votes. :smile:

Chris


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Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:21 pm
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Three votes for Dorian Grey



Wed Feb 25, 2009 4:41 pm
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Current Standings:

7 - The Portrait of Dorian Gray

5 - Satanic Versus

3 - My Ishmael


Edit: Thanks for adding these up, Grim, but keep in mind that people with less than 25 posts cannot vote in our book selection polls.

Chris



Thu Feb 26, 2009 12:51 am
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3 votes for The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde


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Fri Feb 27, 2009 3:23 pm
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Three votes for My Ishmael



Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:08 pm
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3 votes for the Portrait of Dorian Gray

(which I will read and discuss if I can get the book, unlike Name of the Rose which I ordered but Amazon never shipped to me).



Fri Feb 27, 2009 5:33 pm
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