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Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010 
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Post Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
What would you like to read and discuss as our non-fiction book in February and March 2010?

Please give us more than just the title and author of the book. Share a review or two and provide a link to where we can research the book. The most important way you can help us is by giving feedback on all the suggestions you see in this thread. Suggest a book, but then give us feedback on the books suggested by other people.

So what would you like to read next?



Sat Jan 09, 2010 1:51 am
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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Jacques Barzun's From Dawn to Decadence.

This astonishing and monumental work may fairly take its place alongside Gibbon, and for much the same array of qualities: a majestic view of five hundred years of history, done in great style, with vast erudition and continuously entertaining idiosyncrasy of judgment. Alistair Cooke.

When Pogo stated, "I've met the enemy and it is us" I never understood how that was true although instinctively I knew it was true. Barzun very carefully and patiently told me how and why "it is us." There is no blame. He is not polemic. It's just the facts man and you need to remember he lived the last 100 years he presented as history. He was 10 years old when WWI was going on. He was 84 when he started writing this book after a lifetime of teaching history at Columbia University, and it shows. The rich patina of tone that comes from years of teaching and research, still stored in memory and recalled at will, allows these thoughts to be presented as a personal lecture. As one person mentioned, "He could not have written this book when he was 50." The BT members who read and discuss this work will be blessed.



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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Lives of the Trees: an Uncommon History, Diana Wells

Amazon: Diana Wells.... turns her attention to something bigger—our deep-rooted relationship with trees. As she investigates the names and meanings of trees, telling their legends and lore, she reminds us of just how innately bound we are to these protectors of our planet. Since the human race began, we have depended on them for food, shade, shelter and fuel, not to mention furniture, musical instruments, medicine utensils and more.

Workman Publishing: As she investigates the names and meanings of trees, telling their legends and lore, she reminds us of just how innately bound we are to these protectors of our planet. Since the human race began, we have depended on them for food, shade, shelter and fuel, not to mention furniture, musical instruments, medicine utensils and more.

Wells has a remarkable ability to dig up the curious and the captivating: At one time, a worm found in a hazelnut prognosticated ill fortune. Rowan trees were planted in churchyards to prevent the dead from rising from their graves. Greek arrows were soaked in deadly yew, and Shakespeare’s witches in Macbeth used “Gall of goat and slips of Yew” to make their lethal brew. One bristlecone pine, at about 4,700 years old, is thought to be the oldest living plant on earth. All this and more can be found in the beautifully illustrated pages (themselves born of birch bark!) of 100 Trees.

The idea of reading a biography of plants (as opposed to people) intrigues me greatly. And it would certainly be something different!


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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Broken Birds, The Story of My Momila.
Two holocaust survivors and what happened next.



Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:02 pm
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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Crystal Horizon: Everest: the First Solo Ascent

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The controversial Messner, revered by some as the spiritual leader of mountaineering and denounced by others as a macho peak-bagger, chronicles his extraordinary 1980 solo climb of the world's tallest mountain. Messner's philosophy dictates that he climb without the aid of oxygen and unencumbered by the people and equipment of large-scale expeditions; he carries only a tent, camera, some climbing equipment, and food. Climbing from the Tibetan side, Messner provides intriguing observations of that mysterious region. He also includes fascinating stories of the climbers who preceded him. Messner presents selections from the diary of his American girlfriend, who accompanied him to base camp. Messner's reflections, coupled with those entries, show Messner to be egotistical and self-centered, perhaps the very characteristics that make him such a determined, ambitious, and great climber. Highly recommended for adult as well as YA collections.
- Melinda Stivers Leach, Precision Editorial Svces., Boulder, Col.

:book:



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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Lawrence wrote:
Jacques Barzun's From Dawn to Decadence.

This astonishing and monumental work may fairly take its place alongside Gibbon, and for much the same array of qualities: a majestic view of five hundred years of history, done in great style, with vast erudition and continuously entertaining idiosyncrasy of judgment. Alistair Cooke.

When Pogo stated, "I've met the enemy and it is us" I never understood how that was true although instinctively I knew it was true. Barzun very carefully and patiently told me how and why "it is us." There is no blame. He is not polemic. It's just the facts man and you need to remember he lived the last 100 years he presented as history. He was 10 years old when WWI was going on. He was 84 when he started writing this book after a lifetime of teaching history at Columbia University, and it shows. The rich patina of tone that comes from years of teaching and research, still stored in memory and recalled at will, allows these thoughts to be presented as a personal lecture. As one person mentioned, "He could not have written this book when he was 50." The BT members who read and discuss this work will be blessed.

Wow, what an interesting book. At 912 pages it may be too long, but I'm definitely thinking of getting it - only $14.40
http://www.amazon.com/Dawn-Decadence-We ... 0060928832
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Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com Review
In the last half-millennium, as the noted cultural critic and historian Jacques Barzun observes, great revolutions have swept the Western world. Each has brought profound change--for instance, the remaking of the commercial and social worlds wrought by the rise of Protestantism and by the decline of hereditary monarchies. And each, Barzun hints, is too little studied or appreciated today, in a time he does not hesitate to label as decadent.
To leaf through Barzun's sweeping, densely detailed but lightly written survey of the last 500 years is to ride a whirlwind of world-changing events. Barzun ponders, for instance, the tumultuous political climate of Renaissance Italy, which yielded mayhem and chaos, but also the work of Michelangelo and Leonardo--and, he adds, the scientific foundations for today's consumer culture of boom boxes and rollerblades. He considers the 16th-century varieties of religious experimentation that arose in the wake of Martin Luther's 95 theses, some of which led to the repression of individual personality, others of which might easily have come from the "Me Decade." Along the way, he offers a miniature history of the detective novel, defends Surrealism from its detractors, and derides the rise of professional sports, packing in a wealth of learned and often barbed asides.

Never shy of controversy, Barzun writes from a generally conservative position; he insists on the importance of moral values, celebrates the historical contributions of Christopher Columbus, and twits the academic practitioners of political correctness. Whether accepting of those views or not, even the most casual reader will find much that is new or little-explored in this attractive venture into cultural history. --Gregory McNamee --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.



From Publishers Weekly
Now 92, Barzun, the renowned cultural critic, historian and former Columbia provost and professor, offers much more than a summation of his life's work in this profound, eloquent, often witty historical survey. A book of enormous riches, it's sprinkled with provocations. For example, Barzun contradicts Max Weber, arguing that the Protestant Reformation did not galvanize the capitalist spirit. With feminist ardor, he depicts the 16th century as molded and directed by women "as brilliant as the men, and sometimes more powerful" (e.g., Queens Elizabeth and Isabella). His eclectic synthesis is organized around a dozen or so themes--including emancipation, abstraction and individualism--that in his judgment define the modern era. Barzun keeps up the momentum with scores of snappy profiles, including of Luther, Erasmus, Cromwell, Mozart, Rousseau and Byron, as well as of numerous unsung figures such as German educator Friedrich Froebel, inventor of kindergarten, and turn-of-the-century American pioneer ecologist George Marsh. Other devices help make this tome user-friendly--the margins are chock-full of quotes, while vignettes of Venice in 1650, Weimar in 1790 and Chicago in 1895 give a taste of the zeitgeist. In Barzun's glum estimate, the late 20th century has brought decadence into full bloom--separatism in all forms, apathetic electorates, amoral art that embraces filth or mere shock value, the decline of the humanities, the mechanization of life--but he remains hopeful that humanity will find its way again. This is a book to be reckoned with. First serial to American Scholar; BOMC selection. (May)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.



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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Thanks for all the book suggestions everyone. Please try to include links so we can all research the book a bit. :)



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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
As for Barzun's Dawn to Decadence. This is for the person that really enjoys reading more about western cultural evolution than history. It's almost pure cultural history and what I mean by that is that it talks mostly about the arts. The changes in tastes between music and literature easily fill up half of this very large book and it gets pretty in depth. Anyone that isn't very interested in how many lines go into a certain type of poetry or why or how opera was developed and how long it remained popular will be nodding off occasionally. There's page after page of terms unknown to me still which describe a particular form of writing or poetry and damn it's too much for me to keep my interest.

I love history but understand that this is pure cultural history and anyone that already doesn't have a strong grasp of history is going to be disappointed. For someone with a good grasp this book is the ultimate gap filler and an enlightened supplement that is sure to bring a smile and a thanks to such a learned individual as Barzun is.

It has really opened my eyes to authors I knew nothing about - Tasso and Ariosto for example. It really had some parts that connected with me and taught me. Not Barzun's fault but mine in that I wasn't able to appreciate most of the book because of my lack of knowledge in most of the areas he liked talking about.

And he is pretty opinionated as far as who was key in changing, developing, or influencing culture. It's a book, a single book, covering 500 years of the cultural evolution of multiple continents!

Take it for what it's worth. The writing itself is conversational and easy to read.



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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
“Filthy Lucre” takes a look at some common stereotypes that people have about the economy, and then shows why they are often incorrect. He does a critique on six central ideas of capitalism, and then to be balanced, does the same with six examples of common wisdom subscribed to by leftists. The thrust of the book seems to be to urge people to reject clichés, and to dig deeper to discover their own facts.


http://www.amazon.com/Filthy-Lucre-Econ ... 176&sr=1-1


I read parts of Barzun’s book, and although it is an admirable work, there were many parts of the 900 page essay that left me adrift. Although I enjoy the arts myself, I found I was completely out of my depth with this book. I think I would need a course in art history to really do it justice.


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Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:29 pm
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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
I'm not one to recommend that a particular book be read next, but should any of you decide to read Barzun's From Dawn to Decadence, you may find useful an Expanded Table of Contents that I have begun to compile on the book.



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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Here's a book that I am going to be reading when it arrives. From Eternity to Here by Sean Carroll. There is a youtube video with the author talking about the book and there is a review in Discover.

As for what has been already suggested, both Dawn to Decadence and Lives of Trees sound great. I will be putting both on my wish list.


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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
My wife has urged me to read Deep Survival by Laurence Gonzales. It recounts individuals' experiences with survival in outdoor and other catastrophes, but as the two reader reviews below say, it has interest for those not into risking their lives on mountains.

By Mary Ann Farley "maffetina" (Hoboken, NJ USA) -

Those who are focusing on whether or not Gonzales is actually instructing you on how to survive in the wild are completely missing the point of Deep Survival. As a totally urban chick who'd rather die than hike, I bought the book not because I wanted to learn about mountaineering, but to investigate why I've survived a blood disorder that has killed others. And thanks to this book, I've gotten my answer. Gonzales beautifully explains and explores the paradox that must be absorbed completely if one is to live through a catastrophe--which is that to survive something, you must surrender to it, basically fall into it, accepting all the pain and suffering, if you're ever going to get out of it. When you're able to quickly adapt to a new reality and make this new place--however frightening--your new home, you've a much better chance of surviving than the person who's in denial. For one thing, your sense of spirituality and wonder deepens, and this is a tremendous life force in and of itself. It helps you enjoy where you ARE, instead of frantically trying to get to where you think you should be. This is simply a great life lesson, whether you're lost in the woods, or just trying to live a happier existence.
He explains the paradox so well--that in order to survive, one must surrender, yet at the same time not give in. There must be a sheer raw determination to win the game, yet an acceptance of possibly losing it as well, which paradoxically, gives you an edge. And if you can muster a playful spirit on top of it all, well--then you're just golden. A *great* read.

Listen Up, Grasshopper, February 13, 2004
By Mary Esterhammer-Fic (Chicago, IL United States)

This review is from: Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why (Hardcover)
Laurence Gonzales has written a riveting book, not about survival technique, but survival philosophy. The points he makes can be applied to any situation in which you find yourself endangered physically, mentally, or emotionally. He weaves together the tao te ching, chaos theory, musings on Roman military tactics, biological lessons on how the brain works to help us preserve the species by preserving ourselves, true-life experiences from people who have endured some of the more bizarre "accidents", and his own taste for thrills.
Gonzales bookends the essays with the story of his father, a scientist who, as a young flier during WWII, was shot down over Germany. He FELL out of his plane--he didn't parachute, he literally fell--and lived through a harrowing recovery as a POW.

Why did his dad make it when the rest of his crew was killed?

Some of this has to do with events you can't control, and some of it has to do with how to control yourself so that you can find a way out of dire straits. He points out that some people can make every correct decision and end up being killed, while others make every wrong decision and walk out of the woods (or off a mountain...) unscathed. But, you can learn to THINK like a survivor, and greatly increase your chances of getting through what may seem, even to others in the same sinking boat, like a no-win situation.

Gonzales's dad taught him, "Plan the flight. Fly the plan, but don't fall in love with the plan." Being prepared is only part of the equation; being able to adjust to changing circumstances is what a lot of us forget about.

Reading this book is an adventure in itself. If you're a city dweller, like me, and don't anticipate not having the Sears Tower in your line of sight if you get disoriented, it's still enjoyable, and applicable to what you will eventually experience



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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
I am new to the site, and have just finished reading Diane Ackerman's "A Natural History of the Senses" this book may have already been discussed on the site, but if not, it is definitely worth talking about.


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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
Barzun does indeed sound interesting, but can we handle the length? Or would that put some of us off? That is the only thing I am a bit concerned about whereas the content sounds highly intriguing.


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Post Re: Non-Fiction Book Suggestions for February & March 2010
I'll put a poll up in the next day or two. Any more suggestions or feedback on the books already suggested?



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