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minor correction for Darwin

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MadArchitect

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minor correction for Darwin

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www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1427040,00.html*I edited link as it was not resolving...too many http's* - Mr. P.And, no, I didn't post this link just for the two capitalized words at the beginning of the article. Though, come on, the editor had to have consciously let that one through, right? Edited by: misterpessimistic  at: 3/15/05 10:04 am
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Loricat
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Re: minor correction for Darwin

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One group of birds are bigger (the big tits), and thus 'bullies'; the other group of birds live in a less advantageous area, away from the bullies, and are thus smaller. Is Darwin really wrong here? Sounds like these two groups wouldn't want to mate.Lori "All beings are the owners of their deeds, the heirs to their deeds."
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Re: minor correction for Darwin

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In any event...who says that everything Darwin postulated is 100% true? Celebrating small deviations of an accepted theory, if indeed this is that, is similar to celebrating failures of otherwise successful people...just LOOKING for SOMTHING to say "SEE...I told you so" about.This may offer something to this topic:Allopatric Species - Definition: Relating to or involving two populations of the same species which cannot interbreed because they are separated by a geographic barrier (such as a mountain range or wide river). Sympatric Species - Definition: Refers to different species or populations of the same species that live in the same geographic area. Compare to allopatric.Mr. P. The one thing of which I am positive is that there is much of which to be negative - Mr. P.I came to get down, I came to get down. So get out ya seat and jump around - House of PainHEY! Is that a ball in your court? - Mr. PI came to kick ass and chew Bubble Gum...and I am all out of Bubble Gum - They Live, Roddy Piper
MadArchitect

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Re: minor correction for Darwin

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Thanks for fixing the link, P.I posted the link because I thought it was a potentially interesting clarification of the Darwinian model, not in order to discredit Darwin. I first came across the story on the back page of Harper's magazine, then googled it. I'd like to have seen the actual article from Nature, but for some reason the search function of the site wasn't functioning properly when I tried. Maybe I'll think to look it up when I make my monthly trip to the library on Thursday. The finding suggests to me that evolution can also work along territorial lines in a way that is not strictly geographical, but is in some ways analagous to geographical isolation. In other words, that intraspecific competition can have essentially the same effect as isolation. It's actually a rather intuitive idea in retrospect -- you can see a similar, localized effect on the social level with the development of subcultures. That's interesting in and of itself, but I wonder if maybe there aren't important implications on the current model of human evolution as well.As for allopatric and sympatric species, I have to assume that the observed departure is sufficiently different from sympatric speciation to make it worthwhile noting. While there's no large-scale geographic isolation in sympatric speciation, there are factors that make it almost equivalent to isolation by restricting gene flow between parts of a population. Usually, as I understand it, it occurs when a portion of a given population explores a new reproductive niche within their environment, as with insect species that lay and fertilize their eggs in a particular fruit. Sympatric speciation is still a form of geographic speciation, though the segments of the diverging population are not geographically prevented from breeding -- "preference" has played a part in determining the geographic boundries. As I understand it, the Wytham Woods example would seem to indicate that speciation make take place even in animals that have no such boundries -- that diverging species may simply choose not to mate with a divergently evolving population.I'll have to look more into it. Hopefully, I'll have my hands on a copy of the Nature article in a few days. In the meantime, I hope anyone who knows more about sympatric speciation will feel inclined to correct me where I've distorted the theory.
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Re: minor correction for Darwin

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Very interesting link Mad. Thanks for posting. ___________________Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?-Douglas Adams, Last Chance To See
MadArchitect

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Re: minor correction for Darwin

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Didn't get to check out the Nature article when I went into the library today. I didn't get in until around 5pm, and they were closing early for Spring Break, so I just barely had time to track down the books I was looking for. Maybe next time, or maybe I'll check the public library.
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