• In total there are 0 users online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 0 guests (based on users active over the past 60 minutes)
    Most users ever online was 616 on Thu Jan 18, 2024 7:47 pm

Justice, Texas style

A forum dedicated to friendly and civil conversations about domestic and global politics, history, and present-day events.
Forum rules
Do not promote books in this forum. Instead, promote your books in either Authors: Tell us about your FICTION book! or Authors: Tell us about your NON-FICTION book!.

All other Community Rules apply in this and all other forums.
irishrosem

1E - BANNED
Kindle Fanatic
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 11:38 am
17

Justice, Texas style

Unread post

How does it make you feel that stories like this come from Texas, the state with the highest execution rate post-1976 bar none?Quote:James Curtis Giles spent 10 years in prison for a gang rape he has long said he did not commit.On Monday, more than a decade after his release, a prosecutor told the court that his arrest had been a case of mistaken identity, and the judge recommended he be exonerated.If the appeals court formally approves State District Judge Robert Francis' recommendation as expected, Giles, now 53, will become the 13th Dallas County man to be exonerated since 2001 with the help of DNA evidence.13 innocent people convicted of crimes, in one county, in a state that's executed 390 people since 1976. (The runner-up in that grisly race, btw, is Virginia at 98. Our Floridians should not feel left out, Florida makes the top five with 64 executions). Meanwhile, Texas has a busy spring; the state has 9 scheduled executions between today and the end of June
User avatar
Frank 013
Worthy of Worship
Posts: 2021
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 8:55 pm
18
Location: NY
Has thanked: 548 times
Been thanked: 171 times

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

My big issue with abolishing the death penalty is simply; what do we do with the really hard core killers? The ones who escape and kill again or continue to kill in prison (both other inmates and correction officers) Complete isolation is considered cruel and unusual punishment as is restriction from outside activities and denial of the use of certain facilities (the law library). Whenever these prisoners are out of their cells people are in danger. Yet we cannot deny them these basic freedoms.When a convicted murder kills again later, how is this acceptable either? It seems like a loose, loose proposition to me. Later
User avatar
Mr. P

1F - BRONZE CONTRIBUTOR
Has Plan to Save Books During Fire
Posts: 3826
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2004 10:16 am
19
Location: NJ
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 137 times
Gender:
United States of America

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

But the thing is, why is Texas so much more 'ahead' in executions? Abolishing the death penalty is one thing, but abusing it is the main point here. Texas no doubt abuses it...and I am sure some of these people were wrongly accused and sentenced.The shoot from the hip attitude is embodied most in the Texas mentality...the fucktards that they are (overall, not specific people).And we get Bush on top of it all. Nuke 'em I say! Oopss...sorry, I just got caught up in the Texas spirit.Mr. P. I'm not saying it's usual for people to do those things but I(with the permission of God) have raised a dog from the dead and healed many people from all sorts of ailments. - Asana Boditharta (former booktalk troll)The one thing of which I am positive is that there is much of which to be negative - Mr. P.What is all this shit about Angels? Have you heard this? 3 out of 4 people believe in Angels. Are you F****** STUPID? Has everybody lost their mind? - George CarlinI came to kick ass and chew Bubble Gum...and I am all out of Bubble Gum - They Live, Roddy Piper
Murray Graham
Experienced
Posts: 104
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:14 pm
19

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

Quote:My big issue with abolishing the death penalty is simply; what do we do with the really hard core killers? The ones who escape and kill again or continue to kill in prison (both other inmates and correction officers) How many do escape and go on killing sprees, really? My spouse, who is ex-corrections, tells me that most of those that kill in prison are there for other reasons than murder, as well.Quote:Complete isolation is considered cruel and unusual punishment as is restriction from outside activities and denial of the use of certain facilities (the law library). Not where the prisoner is shown to be a danger to others.Quote:When a convicted murder kills again later, how is this acceptable either? What is the actual recidivism rate for murder? I think its lower than many, many other crimes.Regards,M. GrahamIt seems like a loose, loose proposition to me. Trouble rather the tiger in his lair than the sage among his books.For to you kingdoms and their armies are things mighty and enduring,but to him they are but toys of the moment,to be overturned with the flick of a finger. -- Gordon R.Dickson
User avatar
Mr. P

1F - BRONZE CONTRIBUTOR
Has Plan to Save Books During Fire
Posts: 3826
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2004 10:16 am
19
Location: NJ
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 137 times
Gender:
United States of America

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

DING DING DING DING DING DING....Murray gets the prize for word of the day:recidivism: a tendency to relapse into a previous condition or mode of behavior; especially : relapse into criminal behavior Thanks Murray!Mr. P. I'm not saying it's usual for people to do those things but I(with the permission of God) have raised a dog from the dead and healed many people from all sorts of ailments. - Asana Boditharta (former booktalk troll)The one thing of which I am positive is that there is much of which to be negative - Mr. P.What is all this shit about Angels? Have you heard this? 3 out of 4 people believe in Angels. Are you F****** STUPID? Has everybody lost their mind? - George CarlinI came to kick ass and chew Bubble Gum...and I am all out of Bubble Gum - They Live, Roddy Piper
irishrosem

1E - BANNED
Kindle Fanatic
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 11:38 am
17

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

Frank: My big issue with abolishing the death penalty is simply; what do we do with the really hard core killers? The ones who escape and kill again or continue to kill in prison (both other inmates and correction officers) With the above, I was more speaking to states' efforts to get convictions rather than to get accurate convictions. It doesn't surprise me that there have been 13 overturned convictions, in one Texas county alone, due to irrefutable evidence (usually DNA) of the defendants' innocence. The judicial process is not always accurate, and counsels' actions are not always honest. What bothers me is that a state that is obviously having problems with accurate convictions continues to execute its defendants in such quantities. As for the death penalty itself, I found long ago that there are no benefits to the death penalty. There are both ideological and logistical reasons that the death penalty does not benefit the state or its citizens. Ideologically, outside the error rates that occur in the judicial system, the death penalty is completely arbitrary with no way to determine how or why it is sought. However, it often follows racial lines that, I'm sure, we can all guess
irishrosem

1E - BANNED
Kindle Fanatic
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 11:38 am
17

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

Mr. P.: recidivism: a tendency to relapse into a previous condition or mode of behavior; especially : relapse into criminal behavior Actually recidivism usually plays into the lead up to murder. Most murder convicts had multiple contacts with the law prior to the murder incident(s), particularly possession (drugs and instruments of crime) convictions. So a lot of the interest with recidivism is prior to the murder conviction, and therefore doesn't much play into the death penalty question.More so, with the death penalty, is whether or not it acts as a deterrent. Does the threat of execution deter people from murdering? The answer is a resounding no.
Murray Graham
Experienced
Posts: 104
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:14 pm
19

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

Quote:Murray gets the prize for word of the dayI'd like to thank the membersof the academy....Do you need my mailing address to send me my cheque? I prefer cash rather than merchandise prizes....Regards,M. Graham Trouble rather the tiger in his lair than the sage among his books.For to you kingdoms and their armies are things mighty and enduring,but to him they are but toys of the moment,to be overturned with the flick of a finger. -- Gordon R.Dickson
User avatar
Mr. P

1F - BRONZE CONTRIBUTOR
Has Plan to Save Books During Fire
Posts: 3826
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2004 10:16 am
19
Location: NJ
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 137 times
Gender:
United States of America

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

Ah...Murray, the prize is my dirty undies...Whats that address? I'm not saying it's usual for people to do those things but I(with the permission of God) have raised a dog from the dead and healed many people from all sorts of ailments. - Asana Boditharta (former booktalk troll)The one thing of which I am positive is that there is much of which to be negative - Mr. P.What is all this shit about Angels? Have you heard this? 3 out of 4 people believe in Angels. Are you F****** STUPID? Has everybody lost their mind? - George CarlinI came to kick ass and chew Bubble Gum...and I am all out of Bubble Gum - They Live, Roddy Piper
Murray Graham
Experienced
Posts: 104
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:14 pm
19

Re: Justice, Texas style

Unread post

Quote:I prefer cash rather than merchandise prizes....Keep the undies...Regards,M. Graham Trouble rather the tiger in his lair than the sage among his books.For to you kingdoms and their armies are things mighty and enduring,but to him they are but toys of the moment,to be overturned with the flick of a finger. -- Gordon R.Dickson
Post Reply

Return to “Current Events & History”