• In total there is 1 user online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest (based on users active over the past 60 minutes)
    Most users ever online was 616 on Thu Jan 18, 2024 7:47 pm

Homeless Veterans

A forum dedicated to friendly and civil conversations about domestic and global politics, history, and present-day events.
Forum rules
Do not promote books in this forum. Instead, promote your books in either Authors: Tell us about your FICTION book! or Authors: Tell us about your NON-FICTION book!.

All other Community Rules apply in this and all other forums.
User avatar
Dissident Heart

1F - BRONZE CONTRIBUTOR
I dumpster dive for books!
Posts: 1790
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2003 11:01 am
20
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 18 times

Homeless Veterans

Unread post

Most Often Asked Questions Concerning Homeless VeteransWho are homeless veterans?The U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) says homeless veterans are mostly males (2 % are females). The vast majority are single, most come from poor, disadvantaged communities, 45% suffer from mental illness, and half have substance abuse problems. America's homeless veterans have served in World War II, Korean War, Cold War, Vietnam, Grenada, Panama, Lebanon, or the military's anti-drug cultivation efforts in South America. Forty-seven percent of homeless veterans served during the Vietnam Era. More than 67% served our country for at least three years and 33% were stationed in a war zone.How many homeless veterans are there? Although accurate numbers are impossible to come by ... no one keeps national records on homeless veterans ... the VA estimates that more than 299,321 veterans are homeless on any given night. And, more than half a million experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out of every four homeless males who is sleeping in a doorway, alley, or box in our cities and rural communities has put on a uniform and served our country ... now they need America to remember them.Why are veterans homeless?In addition to the complex set of factors affecting all homelessness ... extreme shortage of affordable housing, livable income, and access to health care ... a large number of displaced and at-risk veterans live with lingering effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and substance abuse, compounded by a lack of family and social support networks.A top priority is secure, safe, clean housing that offers a supportive environment which is free of drugs and alcohol.While "most homeless people are single, unaffiliated men ... most housing money in existing federal homelessness programs, in contrast, is devoted to helping homeless families or homeless women with dependant children," according to "Is Homelessness a Housing Problem?" in Understanding Homelessness: New Policy and Research Perspectives published by Fannie Mae Foundation, 1997.Doesn't the Department of Veterans Affairs take care of homeless veterans?To a certain degree, yes. According to the VA's 1997 report, in the years since it "began responding to the special needs of homeless veterans, its homeless treatment and assistance network has developed into the nation's largest provider of homeless services. Serving more than 100,000 veterans annually."With an estimated 500,000 veterans homeless at some time during the year, the VA reaches less than 20% of those in need ... leaving 400,000 veterans without supportive services.Since 1987, VA's programs for homeless veterans have emphasized collaboration with community service providers.What services do veterans need?Veterans need a coordinated effort that provides secure housing and nutritional meals; essential physical health care, substance abuse aftercare and mental health counseling; and personal development and empowerment. Veterans also need job assessment, training and placement assistance.NCHV strongly believes that all programs to assist homeless veterans must focus on helping veterans reach the point where they can obtain and sustain employment.What seems to work best?The most effective programs for homeless and at-risk veterans are community-based, nonprofit, "veterans helping veterans" groups. Programs that seem to work best feature transitional housing with the camaraderie of living in structured, substance-free environments with fellow veterans who are succeeding at bettering themselves. Because government money for homeless veterans is currently limited and serves only one in 10 of those in need, it is critical that community groups reach out to help provide the support, resources and opportunities most Americans take for granted: housing, employment and health care.There are about 200 community-based veteran organizations across the country that have demonstrated impressive success reaching homeless veterans. These groups are most successful when they work in collaboration with Federal, State, and local government agencies, other homeless providers, and veteran service organizations. Veterans who participate in these programs have a higher chance of becoming tax-paying, productive citizens again.What can you do?- Determine the need in your community. - Visit with homeless veteran providers. - Contact your local mayor's office for a list of providers. - Involve others. - If you are not already part of an organization, pull together a few people who might be interested in attacking this issue. - Participate in local homeless coalitions. Chances are there is one in your community. If not, this may be the time to start bringing people together around this critical need. - Send a financial donation to your local homeless veteran provider. - Contact your elected officials, and discuss what is being done in your community for homeless veterans.
User avatar
Dissident Heart

1F - BRONZE CONTRIBUTOR
I dumpster dive for books!
Posts: 1790
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2003 11:01 am
20
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 18 times

Swords to Plowshares

Unread post

Swords to PlowsharesFounded in 1974, Swords to Plowshares is a community-based, not-for-profit organization that provides counseling and case management, employment and training, housing, and legal assistance to veterans in the San Francisco Bay Area. We promote and protect the rights of veterans through advocacy, public education and partnerships with local, state, and national entities. Quote:War causes wounds and suffering that last beyond the battlefield. Our mission is to heal the wounds, to restore dignity, hope and self-sufficiency to all veterans in need, and to significantly reduce homelessness and poverty among veterans.
Post Reply

Return to “Current Events & History”