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Hola from the More Southern Latitudes

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marti1900

Hola from the More Southern Latitudes

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Just found this forum last night from a google search on something totally unrelated. The mind boggles.I'm an American expat living in central Mexico, beautiful scenery, great weather, lovely people...no books. What a nice community of thoughtful people here at Booktalk. Oh, and by the way, I don't care how many posts entitle one to certain titles. I want to be Cleverly Amusing. I have always aspired to be Cleverly Amusing. Usually, I am only Amusing. Often not even that.I am glad to see another athiest here. When asked religion, I usually answer Bhuddist, just to stir the pot. That is then usually greeted with a resounding thud of silence.Looking forward to more interaction with this interesting group.Marti in Mexico
Ken Hemingway

Re: Hola from the More Southern Latitudes

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Welcome to the neighbourhood, Marti. I hope you have a lot of fun here. Is that animated icon a picture of you grabbing the universe by the wachimacallets?
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Mr. P

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Re: Hola from the More Southern Latitudes

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Welcome!Mr. P. The one thing of which I am positive is that there is much of which to be negative - Mr. P.I came to get down, I came to get down. So get out ya seat and jump around - House of PainHEY! Is that a ball in your court? - Mr. PI came to kick ass and chew Bubble Gum...and I am all out of Bubble Gum - They Live, Roddy Piper
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Chris OConnor

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Re: Hola from the More Southern Latitudes

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MartiWelcome to BookTalk!So you're an expat? Hmmm... I did make a few posts and sent a handful of emails to some expats last year. We had a discussion here on BookTalk and it got me to surfing the web. Prior to that discussion I had no idea what an expat even was, and even at this point I'd love to learn more. Wanna tell us your story?Chris
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Loricat
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Re: Hola from the More Southern Latitudes

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marti,you and I need to have a chat -- I did the expat thing for 3 years in Korea. It was quite the experience. I agree with Chris, tell us more of what you're doing down there!Lori "All beings are the owners of their deeds, the heirs to their deeds."
MonsterDick

Re: Hola from the More Southern Latitudes

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Hi marti! Expat is short for expatriate, right? Pls let me (us) in more on your "doings" in Mexico!!!Look forward to hearing from you here!!!Stay safe.Rob
marti1900

Halloween in Mexico

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Well, I bought 150 pieces of candy to give out to the Trick-or-Treaters, but Halloween in Zacatecas was, you'll pardon the expression, silent as the tomb. Not one little person in costume in sight.But my students told me that the big night here for candy grubbing is Nov 1, El Dia de los Muertos...Day of the Dead. With the time change, it gets dark here about 7:00. Shortly after 7, last night, Nov. 1, I start hearing voices, cars, activity. I look out and the street is filled with people. One car parked in front of my house. It had a carboard coffin, complete with cross and RIP strapped to the top of the minivan. Doors flew open and a thousand costumed people spilled out and began to yell the traditional Halloween/Day of the Dead chant: "El muerto quiero camote, sino se cae su bigote". 'the dead man wants camote (a kind of sweet potato) or else his mustache will fall off. The chant/song goes on for several verses, ending with a request to help the widow.They come to the door in groups, packs. The costumes in Zacatecas are all skeletons, witches, girls as dead people with white painted faces and white burial dresses, diablos, and the best of the rubber masks with eyeballs falling out, blood splatters, skull faces. No Winnie the Poohs, Spidermen, Batmen, princesses, queens, raggedy anns here. And of course, the ever-popular 'no costume' costume of the young teenage boy. They ring the bell and yell their song. And of course, they are all accompanied by adults, many of which have their own bag to collect goodies.We frantically put candy into the outstretched hands, and because we gringos are oddities here in this rather remote city, many of the kids try out their rudimentary English. "Thank you, Miss." "Hello" "Bye" "Happy Halloween". "Bye", they call as they rush off to the next house. "Thank you". After the pack finished our area, they all load up back into the caravan of cars, and the coffin-carrying vehicle leads the way to another section of my neighborhood. But they are soon followed by more cars, and more kids, and more "Thank you, miss", and more chants and more little skeletons and witches and dead people.One ring of my doorbell is the American son and daughter-in-law of one of my neighbors, with their 9 month old girl, all dolled up in a raggedy ann costume. They come in and we compare experiences here. Their older boys have gone with the pack to chant and collect candy and chile-covered edibles. Another ring, and it is one of my students with a troop of scary characters, who all in unison yell Trick or Treat, beaming proudly at their English for the gringa! We all laughed a lot, and then I requested the song, and I swear you could have heard that group in the next state! In less than one hour, we have exhausted our supply of 150 pieces, and so blow out the candle in my huge ceramic jack o'lantern, and put out all the outside lights. The car parade continues, the groups go on calling their chant and ringing doorbells of houses who still have lights on and some candy left. As the evening wears on, the voices become deeper as the groups change to older kids, most without costumes, roam the streets, without much hope by this hour, of finding a house that is still handing out goodies.It was wonderful. We had so much fun, and have determined that next year we will buy 300 pieces so our fun can go on longer. Marti in Mexico
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