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Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3) 
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
Taylor wrote:
Harper Lee manages to define her story and its particular situation, I don't get the impression, that through her story she had hopes of presenting a larger picture element, that's what society tried to do with the small story she told.

I agree with you Taylor. To Kill a Mockingbird became a kind of sacred text.
As I read Watchman what I see is more a Huckleberry Finn,Lake Woebegone days type humourous depiction of the foibles and idiosyncrasies of a small society.
She enjoys recreating the world of children's games with their rules and imagination. That's her literary gift.
The grown ups don't really seem that grown-up and are quite pretentious and self important. No wonder she didn't write another novel with the weight of solemn expectation placed on her.
For sure the race issue will become important as the book goes on and she does see things clearly. Reviewers describe the book as meandering but the meandering is much of what she is about,I think.
She actually finds these things funny and maybe has a satirist's eye for the absurdly comical and sometimes tragic in human life and behaviour.



Last edited by Flann 5 on Wed Aug 05, 2015 7:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Taylor
Wed Aug 05, 2015 7:14 pm
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
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No wonder she didn't write another novel with the weight of solemn expectation placed on her.


That's what I think can be part of the down side to being successful, There's a projection of acclaim that becomes abusive in its perversion of realistic events.



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Flann 5
Wed Aug 05, 2015 7:29 pm
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
There is a lot going on in the novel and there is serious side to it which satire bites into. I've finished part two and am interested to see how it progresses.
Critics think she gets back on track in the middle of the book so it will be interesting to see how this develops.



Wed Aug 05, 2015 7:52 pm
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
You know, I could not recall lake woebegone, of course Garrison Keillor, Prairie Home Companion. Good stuff. Mark Twain, Huck Finn, its some of what's good about this country, running barefoot, chasing what ever there is to chase.

Adventure, from a child's point of view, skirts the story we are into.



Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:00 pm
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
Taylor wrote:
You know, I could not recall lake woebegone, of course Garrison Keillor, Prairie Home Companion. Good stuff. Mark Twain, Huck Finn, its some of what's good about this country, running barefoot, chasing what ever there is to chase.

Adventure, from a child's point of view, skirts the story we are into.

I suppose children see adult behaviour like never ending feuds as crazy,with adult explanations obviously absurd. But it's not enough. Jean Louise is older and will have to come to terms with reality in a different way.



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Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:10 pm
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
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Flann:
Critics think she gets back on track in the middle of the book so it will be interesting to see how this develops.


The time scale of this event is less than two weeks, (her holiday) It develops alright, and you'll be shocked, dismayed, disgruntled, You'll cry, vomit, and beat your head against the wall, You'll curse life, people, America, You'll wonder "what was in that ice cream",

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Jean Louise is older and will have to come to terms with reality in a different way.


We can consider this a coming of age story, You right, there are things she'll confront, Idol worship, that's the theme of this story.



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Flann 5
Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:21 pm
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
Taylor wrote:
We can consider this a coming of age story, You right, there are things she'll confront, Idol worship, that's the theme of this story.

Maybe you're right Taylor and I'm not going to argue with all those heads. There are a few themes like authorities, servants,technology,law and traditions.
It's obvious she thinks the people of Maycomb have an absurdly inflated view of their importance.
The guy who it's called after Colonel Maycomb, got lost for several years in the Indian wars,and it's location and topography was dictated by a liquor store owner who souped up the surveyors with hooch.
It would have been in the swamp if sobriety had prevailed.
For many of course it's disappointing, but she was the kind of writer she was and not the patron saint of equality and liberation but she obviously sees the reality of injustice among other things.



Last edited by Flann 5 on Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:43 pm
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
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Isn't that part of the problem here in the states, we look to humans for answers that are bigger than all of us?.




CHRIS may banish you from booktalk for making such a statement and unleashing my thesis statement in response. In deference to my booktalk friends who have read my rants I will not respond here. I would suggest that your question be rephrased. "We humans look for answers to questions presuming there is an answer that is not based upon spiritual or scientific belief."

Just a thought, I'm not picking a fight this early in our dialogue.


Ahem!! Ahem!! - I am going to get sacked as discussion leader. These comments should be under the next demarkation. Part 2 - Chapters 4 and 5. I'm not going to move them (says she, as if she knew how to do that) but leave them here for the sake of continuity. I do think we might move on though to Part 2 Section. Lawrence is excused as he hasn't got a copy of the book yet.

I want to talk some more about the Baptism scene......but I'm going to do it under the next thread. Even then, I think it should be in Part 3 - which is the following thread.

This was bound to happen with yours truely as leader.......couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery.......(I know this is a very vulgar saying, but it's the fault of Facebook - and my Australian lady friends who are inclined to call a spade a bloody shovel....and I like them.)


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Thu Aug 06, 2015 6:03 am
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
MS. PENNY, I think you are doing a splendid job and if Chris isn't complaining, he's happy.



Thu Aug 06, 2015 8:34 am
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
Crystalline said she was not liking the book and LisaRose loves it, so I want to say to Crystal , please stay with us, we need your input. You are quite forthright and that is good. Furthermore, I would tell you that I didn't like Virginia Wolff's 'To the Lighthouse' but I liked it in retrospect because it lead to a good discussion where we all came out a bit more 'aware' than before.

Flann, gives us the most erudite and professional comments. Should be leader - needed here.

Landroid gave us a great 'push-off'' and started us off brilliantly but must be waiting for us to get to a bit that interests him. Come back!!!'


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Thu Aug 06, 2015 9:21 am
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
I am not judging the book from the first three chapters. I'll keep reading, actually I have read the next assignment (if one can call it that - LOL). I do have some input re prejudice, but am waiting until further discussion into the book. I think that it takes at least maybe 75 pages to get into the story. My younger daughter refused to read my book "Desire and Red Wine..." because after reading the first chapter she found it too boring :). You got to give it a chance :)!!! Not leaving, just busy...doing a commission painting (I'm also an artist)...have grand kids, family, etc. I'm not one of those book worms that reads 5 books per month. Life gets in the way :)!



Thu Aug 06, 2015 10:07 am
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
Penelope wrote:
Crystalline said she was not liking the book and LisaRose loves it, so I want to say to Crystal , please stay with us, we need your input. You are quite forthright and that is good. Furthermore, I would tell you that I didn't like Virginia Wolff's 'To the Lighthouse' but I liked it in retrospect because it lead to a good discussion where we all came out a bit more 'aware' than before.

I find it almost impossible to distinguish the voice and views of the narrator from Jean Louise so far. Crystalline may be right that Jean Louise needs to be more mature in her reactions to what she finds wrong with Maycomb, and it's culture etc.
Maybe as it goes on that will become clearer.
Lawrence wrote:
MS. PENNY, I think you are doing a splendid job and if Chris isn't complaining, he's happy.


I hope you're not saying this Lawrence because Penelope excused you on the grounds of not actually having read the book yet.
Your recollections of your time as prosecuting attorney were interesting,with the background of that time.
No worries about getting everything perfectly organised in categories,Penelope. It's loose but that's o.k and not a real problem.
Hopefully you won't be required to appear with a switch like Miss Rachel,to break up unruly and turbulent behaviour here.
Very funny,that incident.
I don't think I've got it all worked out and often find other perspectives very helpful and it make reading more enjoyable.



Last edited by Flann 5 on Thu Aug 06, 2015 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.



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One more post ought to do it.

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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
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Flann wrote:

I find it almost impossible to distinguish the voice and views of the narrator from Jean Louise so far.


There are some books, where you feel the author sitting on your shoulder.....(Dickens is a bit like that, genius though he was.) I don't know that it is such a bad trait. Virginia Wolff said the author should also be androgynous (you should have seen how I spelt that before I googled it!!). She was a bit of a plonker imo.

I don't mind at all listening to the opinions and ideas of an intelligent gifted author. It is far preferable to listening to the opinions of pop stars and models pontificating. This happens all the time these days. Film stars hold forth on world problems as if the fact that they are famous makes them the fount of all knowledge.

It infuriates me I'm afraid. Experts in the bleeding obvious....... :evil:


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He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad....

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Thu Aug 06, 2015 11:05 am
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
Penelope wrote:
There are some books, where you feel the author sitting on your shoulder.....(Dickens is a bit like that, genius though he was.) I don't know that it is such a bad trait. Virginia Wolff said the author should also be androgynous (you should have seen how I spelt that before I googled it!!).

The narrator seems to me to share Jean Louise perspective so far. So for instance, the narrator will give a history of Maycomb as being absurd,with Colonel Maycomb,getting everything backwards in the Indian wars and eventually being honoured and the town named after him.
We see that Jean Louise knows the same facts as everyone else but sees their grounds for it's importance are absurd,and the narrator is telling us that they are.
I think the opening of chapter four is a good example. The narrator gives a farcical history of how Maycomb came to be located where it was. Interestingly, Jean Louise thinks this wasn't great because it's so far from the nearest transport means which is ferry.So we have distinct voices here but the narrator's history isn't doing the town any favours.
It may be that as it progresses things become clearer and more distinct.



Last edited by Flann 5 on Thu Aug 06, 2015 12:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Thu Aug 06, 2015 11:38 am
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Post Re: Go Set a Watchman - Part I (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
Well I've made it just exactly this far, and have happily read through the discussion for part 1. It feels old now, so I suppose I should just keep reading. I can't see the fun in that so I'm going to participate on an old thread anyway.

I don't find Jean Louise to be remarkably immature, in fact I rather like her indignance. She was never cut out for the refined life and this is quite how I'd imagined she'd turn out, so much so it borders on dull predictability. She is not without sense, she's just rough around the edges. I don't understand how so many people seem to think that she ought to be different, these individuals sound just like Aunty Alex. ;) In all seriousness though, I do like her. It's the same Scout we've always known, short of the lack of mechanical inclination. I would've liked her better had she been more of a "move over boy, I'm driving" type. Though, looking back, I can see this part of her too (her fears, her willingness to follow, etc).

I'm incredibly disheartened that Jem kicked off. I had hoped that Scout and Jem would have held their bond over the years, even through the many miles that separated them. Perhaps this has more to do with my own brother having recently shipped of to Cali for bootcamp but it matters not, I'm still bummed.



Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:59 pm
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