Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Thu Aug 22, 2019 1:17 pm





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
Do US readers relate to foreign lifestyles? 
Author Message
Years of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 3
Location: Australia
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Do US readers relate to foreign lifestyles?
My first book (Somewhere Night Falls - Neil Stanners) was a collection of short stories about childhood and growing up, all set in Australia. I recently updated it and it is now available as a new paperback. It has received some 'nice' commentary and one 5 star review but it never sold much. I have always been intrigued as to whether the problem was that it was just never noticed or that the content was 'foreign' to US readers. Having visited the US my personal opinion is that we have very similar lifestyles, likes and dislikes but maybe US readers only want to read about local subjects. (Come to think of it, the title story of the book, set in WWII, does involve US troops in Australia.)
I'd be very interested in opinions.



Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:17 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Asleep in Reading Chair


Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 177
Location: Tarrytown, NY
Thanks: 16
Thanked: 79 times in 62 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Do US readers relate to foreign lifestyles?
Loftus+ wrote:
My first book (Somewhere Night Falls - Neil Stanners) was a collection of short stories about childhood and growing up, all set in Australia. I recently updated it and it is now available as a new paperback. It has received some 'nice' commentary and one 5 star review but it never sold much. I have always been intrigued as to whether the problem was that it was just never noticed or that the content was 'foreign' to US readers. Having visited the US my personal opinion is that we have very similar lifestyles, likes and dislikes but maybe US readers only want to read about local subjects. (Come to think of it, the title story of the book, set in WWII, does involve US troops in Australia.)
I'd be very interested in opinions.

I think you're jumping too quickly to the notion that simply because your book takes place in Australia, that it would be disliked in the US. Maybe the market for growing up stories isn't huge. Maybe there's a giant glut of entertainment in general, which takes away potential readers who'd rather spend their time with something else.



The following user would like to thank Murmur for this post:
Chris OConnor, Loftus+
Wed Apr 25, 2018 3:00 pm
Profile Email
Years of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 3
Location: Australia
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Do US readers relate to foreign lifestyles?
Thanks for your reply Murmur. Fair point about the glut of entertainment options these days. Technology is a wonderful thing. Unfortunately it tends to give us too much of everything.
I'm secretly hoping that a few (or a few hundred) readers would take a look at this book and tell me if they notice any difference. Or could the settings just as easily be in the US? The stories range from the 1940's to the present day.



Wed Apr 25, 2018 6:47 pm
Profile Email
Finally Comfortable


Joined: Nov 2018
Posts: 53
Thanks: 38
Thanked: 31 times in 23 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Do US readers relate to foreign lifestyles?
I'm new to this site. I live in the UK and this is a topic that has interested me for a while. I think there is a perception that people who live in different countries but speak "English" have similar cultural understanding. I'm not sure this is true; the touchstones of common reference and idiom make each culture distinct. It may be that the job of the writer is to find a way to overcome those awkward disconnections but the problem is that, in so doing, the richness of each culture is diluted.



Mon Nov 26, 2018 7:59 am
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

Announcements 

• Promote Your Fiction Book on BookTalk.org
Sun Jul 30, 2017 7:33 pm

• Promote Your Non-Fiction Book on BookTalk.org
Sun Jul 30, 2017 7:18 pm


Recent Posts 
• What are you reading these days?

Thu Aug 22, 2019 11:46 am

princesscookie19

• Young Debut Author: "Timestamp: Musings of an Introverted Black Boy"

Thu Aug 22, 2019 11:04 am

MarcusGranderson

• Poll: What to do about climate change?

Thu Aug 22, 2019 7:00 am

Robert Tulip

• Buy American Character today and join the discussion!

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:51 pm

Chris OConnor

• Please "Check In" here to the American Character discussion!

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:46 pm

Chris OConnor

• Please check in here if you're going to join the "The Four Horsemen" discussion!

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:43 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 1: Maintaining Freedom

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:41 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 2: Two Paths to Tyranny

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:40 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 3: The Rival Americans

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:40 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 4: The Elite and the Masses (1607 - 1876)

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:39 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 5: The Rise and Fall of Laissez-Faire (1877-1930)

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:38 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 6: The Rise and Fall of National Liberalism (1933 - 1967)

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:37 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 7: Dixie Takes Over (1968 - 2008)

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:37 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 8: Rise of the Radicals (2008-)

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:36 pm

Chris OConnor

• American Character - Ch. 9: A Lasting Union

Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:35 pm

Chris OConnor


Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
How To Promote Your Book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2019. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank