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Ch-ch-ch-changes

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Loricat
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Re: Transformation

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Back to the original questions about change...They are good questions, but I'm going to add one: how can one measure change? From daily alcohol to none, okay. That's pretty dramatic. But what about attitudinal/behavioural changes? How can an individual measure progress? "All beings are the owners of their deeds, the heirs to their deeds." Loricat's Book NookCelebrating the Absurd
SolinaJoki

Re: Ch-ch-ch-changes

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Regarding "is change really possible":Might it not be more applicable to be taking about GROWTH rather than CHANGE. A 10-year-old is very different than a 5-year-old, but we do not speak of him/her as having changed so much as having grown up. In our society, it seems that once we reach adulthood, we breath a sigh of relief and say "I made it." No more growth required now. But there is no reason that our growth should stop. Using the example of smoking, the teenagers' developmental level says that one of the most important considerations is fitting in with peers; hence they smoke. However, with increasing years, one might become concerned about health, lifestyle, etc., and decide smoking is not desirable anymore. I think the concept of growth fits very well here. As we continue to move through various developmental stages, we change due to having attained a higher developmental level only, however, should we chose to. Some people, having reached adulthood, as said by M. Scott Peck, stop "changing their maps." They don't learn to use the computer, use an ATM, get an MP3 player, and they listen to their teenage era music forever more. No change/growth going on here. But, I believe that change/growth is always possible, leaving behind behaviours, choices, etc., that no longer fit and adopting others than are more applicable to one's stage of life.
tomiichi

Re: Ch-ch-ch-changes

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I agree that people generally change more and faster when there are external motivations at stake like having a heart attack and so finally deciding to lose that weight. I think change, even internal, is absolutely possible. I think the internal choice to change is far more rewarding than change due to an external force. I learned that 3 consistant weeks of a new action creates a new habit.But what change doesn't have an external force? If we decide to exercise regularily, isn't it because we want to feel better and look better. Don't we want to feel better so we can keep up with the pace of society and raise our self-esteems to be more confidant to do the things we want to do, and we want to look better so we can feel better. Everything has an external force whether it's traumatic or not. Society builds that upon us.
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Frank 013
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Re: Ch-ch-ch-changes

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Mad wrote...Quote:Has anyone here read the Cochrane Report published earlier this year? I only know about it second hand, but the gist as I understand it is that AA and other twelve step groups are not likely to produce superior results to any other kind of treatment. I'd be interested to know the reasoning behind that conclusion.Penn and Teller did a show about this subject, the findings were...1. A belief in a higher power was necessary to progress in the AA 12 step program.2. After 5 years the number of AA participants that remained sober was 5%. The number of people who just decided to make the attempt on their own also had a 5% success rate after 5 years.The AA program might show better numbers up front but long term success is still beyond their ability.And of course you have to become "born again" to stay involved.Later Edited by: Frank 013 at: 9/14/06 10:23 pm
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Loricat
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Re: Ch-ch-ch-changes

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lizziebizzie's sidestep into Buddhism is a good one -- isn't it true that all of our cells are completely replaced every 7 years? So the person you were when you were 10 is not the person you are now. Physically, your cells have all been replaced, a few times over.Then Solinajoki adds the concept of growth...Ooh, this is just getting interesting.I've said about my husband that I'm glad I didn't meet him 15 years ago. (not an uncommon notion, I know) Even 10 years ago, I wasn't ready for a long-term relationship. What has changed in me? How have I grown? I'm more stable, more in control of my life. I've had my fill of playing around. Now, I find myself enjoying the cooking and cleaning and maintenance of home ownership. I see change and/or growth being caused by:internal control -- what you decide to do within the context of your own behaviours, whether it's quit smoking or stop lying.internal non-control -- what happens to you from inside, that changes your behaviour (mental illness, chronic conditions..)external non-control -- what happens to you...trauma, losing a job, being dumped (Question -- is it only bad stuff?? Can good external events cause change?)external control -- what you make happen in the world around you (buy your first condo, decide to get married, change careers)What do you folks think of my categories? "All beings are the owners of their deeds, the heirs to their deeds." Loricat's Book NookCelebrating the Absurd
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Frank 013
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Re: Ch-ch-ch-changes

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Quote:Soldiers return home from combat much different than when they left. This sounds almost obscenely tautological (like saying "By the way, rape can really make a difference in your life.&quot But, considering the lack of preparation given to Soldiers and their families, it seems as though the Military is largely unaware of this glaring fact.In the context of this thread, I think it raises a few questions:1. What is the role of Trauma in changing a person?2. What are some ways that the Traumas of Combat change a Soldier?3. What needs to change about a Combat Soldier when they return Home?4. What are some ways to assist Soldiers and their Families in adapting, or changing, into a post-combat relationship?You make it sound like trauma can only result in negative change.I was in the gulf War; I saw much death and was the cause of much death. I would like to believe that it made me a better person in the long run. I have more confidence, I renewed my exercise training and returned to karate class, I know that I can protect my family if need be after having been tested in this way, and I still like to test myself regularly. I have superior awareness of my souroundings, I have a renewed love of life and a very positive outlook for my future.Oh, and I do not fear death.There was one negative change, I got a blister on my little toe! but it got better.Later
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Dissident Heart

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Re: Ch-ch-ch-changes

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Frank: You make it sound like trauma can only result in negative change.I'm referring to some of the ways that combat trauma impacts soliders. In the context of the Shay's Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming the bulk of experiences are negative...rather, they damage the soldier in ways that seriously disturb their mental health: profoundly disrupting relationships with family, wives, workmates, neighbors...resulting in sharp increases in drug abuse and alcoholism, depression, isolation, and physical violence to self and others.No doubt, many of these Soldiers refer to the ways the trauma created the most extreme bonds of friendship, care and willingness to sacrifice one's life for a brother in arms...bonds that they were never able to recreate in peace time.Frank: I was in the gulf War; I saw much death and was the cause of much death. I would like to believe that it made me a better person in the long run.I'm sure you would, as would I and most people I suppose. I don't know you well enough to make any judgement or diagnose any symptoms of PTSD, etc....so I wish you well in your return to civilian life. I'm also sure you recognize the very severe ways that Combat Trauma damages the minds and bodies of soldiers...not creating better people, but shattering whole persons and families.Frank: There was one negative change, I got a blister on my little toe! but it got better.Thank God for that.
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Frank 013
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Re: Ch-ch-ch-changes

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There are many cases of combat mental trauma no doubt, but I think it might shed some light on the subject if you compare those numbers to the numbers of military returning from war as a whole. I have not looked at the numbers myself but I suspect it is less than 1%, add this to the reality that many soldiers fake a trauma for the monetary benefits of being disabled. I know a whole host of combat veterans and not one complains of such problems. Some are from as far back as Vietnam and even they say that the numbers were inflated by... 1. The draft many people drafted should have never been soldiers.2. Fakers looking for a free ride.3. The anti war crowd trying to find any reason to justify their pacifistic beliefs.I'm not saying that it's not a problem but I don't think it is nearly as bad as people would believe. Later
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