Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Fri Nov 16, 2018 6:05 pm





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
Ch. 8: How "Ought" One Behave? 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Owner
Diamond Contributor 3

Joined: May 2002
Posts: 15980
Location: Florida
Thanks: 3390
Thanked: 1269 times in 1005 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)
Highscores: 6

 Ch. 8: How "Ought" One Behave?
Ch. 8: How "Ought" One Behave?

Please use this thread to discuss the above section of Lex Bayer and John Figdor’s “Atheist Mind, Humanist Heart: Rewriting the Ten Commandments for the Twenty-first Century.”

You’re also welcome to create new threads however you see fit.



Mon Nov 03, 2014 10:29 pm
Profile Email WWW
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 6093
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1681
Thanked: 1825 times in 1392 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Ch. 8: How "Ought" One Behave?
I saw Dexter's post on Dennett and free will and wondered what Dexter thought about Bayer and Figdor's handling of free will in this chapter. They don't label the topic as free will (wisely, I think), but they are clearly addressing it. And their approach seems to be similar to Dennett's, in that they claim that the atomist view on which philosophical anti-free will is often based is different from the larger-scale psychological view that gives validity to humans as moral agents. Humans can make choices that are substantially their own free acts, is what they seem to be claiming. The claim is important to their argument for "recast[ing[ statements of obligation into statements of preference and choice." (80) In general they promote a model of human acting as consisting of rational choosing.



Fri Jan 02, 2015 11:43 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I issue my own library cards!

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor 2

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 1744
Thanks: 152
Thanked: 721 times in 540 posts
Gender: Male

Post Re: Ch. 8: How "Ought" One Behave?
DWill wrote:
I saw Dexter's post on Dennett and free will and wondered what Dexter thought about Bayer and Figdor's handling of free will in this chapter. They don't label the topic as free will (wisely, I think), but they are clearly addressing it. And their approach seems to be similar to Dennett's, in that they claim that the atomist view on which philosophical anti-free will is often based is different from the larger-scale psychological view that gives validity to humans as moral agents. Humans can make choices that are substantially their own free acts, is what they seem to be claiming. The claim is important to their argument for "recast[ing[ statements of obligation into statements of preference and choice." (80) In general they promote a model of human acting as consisting of rational choosing.


Yeah, they use the same argument about different reference frames. I think they appropriately take this "common sense" notion of free will when talking about morality. I don't think you can really do it otherwise.

Sam Harris talks about how "the illusion of free will" is really an illusion itself. Meaning if we really think about, we have no idea where our last choice came from, it just happened. (Why did the last random thought pop into your head?) But I think the first illusion is still more powerful -- it sure feels like we "could have done otherwise" even if we really couldn't have. So we'll always live our lives as if we're somehow making free choices (as Dennett says, the only kind of free will that matters), and morality doesn't make much sense without it.



The following user would like to thank Dexter for this post:
Interbane, Robert Tulip
Sat Jan 03, 2015 9:14 am
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Resources 
HELPFUL INFO:
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!

IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

PROMOTE YOUR BOOK!
Advertise on BookTalk.org
How To Promote Your Book





BookTalk.org is a thriving book discussion forum, online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a community. Our forums are open to anyone in the world. While discussing books is our passion we also have active forums for talking about poetry, short stories, writing and authors. Our general discussion forum section includes forums for discussing science, religion, philosophy, politics, history, current events, arts, entertainment and more. We hope you join us!


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSOUR BOOKSAUTHOR INTERVIEWSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICYSITEMAP

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism Books

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2018. All rights reserved.


seo for beginners