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Why is Don Quixote such a classic? 
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Post Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
The wonderful thing about reading a work such as Don Quixote is that you start with some trepidation that it will be hard to read, or boring, but then find it entirely engaging and informative. In her Introduction, Edith Grossman notes that DQ has been voted the greatest novel ever. It is easy to see why. As I just mentioned in response to syrianrue's question if anyone has any recommendations for a good book that teaches people how to write better, The Adventures of Don Quixote is at the foundation of numerous modern genres of the novel, including satire, drama, social comment and comedy, and is among the most brilliant classics in its depth of characterisation, wealth of literary allusion and economy of style. The wide use of the term 'quixotic' indicates the pervasive influence of this book, and Grossman notes that it is esteemed as the great definition of the Spanish national character.

Overall, setting Cervantes in his time, Don Quixote was written in 1605 and marks a key point in the evolution of the modern mind. Like his contemporaries Galileo and Shakespeare, Cervantes seeks to be loyal to ancient institutions, on the surface at least, but interprets them with such novel genius that looking back now he appears entirely subversive of the world of the middle ages. The seventeenth century was a hinge between the middle ages and modernity. The decisive philosophical shift was the emergence of the scientific spirit, the demand that all claims about truth should be backed by evidence. The intense irony in DQ is that the Don simply takes to its extreme logical conclusion the fantastic tendencies that were present in traditional life, for example the absurd Christian beliefs in heaven and the virgin birth. By showing that 'knight errancy' is an absurd throwback, Cervantes invites us to ask what other features of our culture deserve examination against the modern criteria of rationality and observation.



Tue Apr 06, 2010 3:51 pm
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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
DQ is a fun book to read, I agree, and seems to be the source of many narrative forms and conventions we have around today, such as the hero and his sidekick. But reverence for a classic shouldn't make us reluctant to point out faults, and one of these in DQ is the amount of dross in the form of the tales-within-a-tale, almost all of which are stereotyped affairs of eloquent shepherds, lovelorn noble lads, and the plight of virtuous and beautiful ladies. They are somewhat similar to Shakespeare comedies but much less fun. These parts are emminently skippable, IMO. Cervantes ridiclued the conventions of the knight errancy stories, but he appeared to be in the thrall of these romances, which are in some ways no more believable.

I'm just getting to the Captive's Tale. From what I remember of it, it proves out a conventional, orthodox view of the Christian religion, which would be in contradiction to your view that Cervantes has a subversive agenda.

In my judgment, inventiveness is the sterling feature of DQ (leaving aside the regurgitated romances) and is the biggest reason for its popularity. It can be slapstick and silly, but Cervantes was a wily storyteller and knew how to keep the audience involved.


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Last edited by DWill on Wed Apr 07, 2010 8:25 am, edited 1 time in total.



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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
I agree, DWill. I am enjoying the story much more than I had ever imagined, and it is very compelling, but there are parts that I could do without. This may sound a bit more bitter than I actually feel (I found as I started writing that I have some legitimate griefs with some parts of the story), but now's as good a time as any to share.

The interpolated novels are somewhat of a drudgery to get through (although not as bad as the whaling chapters in Moby Dick, some of which I had to skip in order to make it through the whole book), and the explanations of nobility and virtue are obnoxious to me, especially because as an independent, intelligent woman, it is pretty annoying to see women depicted in the way that Cervantes' women are, and to see that beauty is their most redeeming quality, second only to virtue (which I assume is also interchangeable with chastity if they aren't married or promised to be married). If they are not beautiful, like the servant girl, Martitornes, and even Aldonza Lorenzo, the "Lady Dulcinea," they are automatically assumed to be sluts, because certainly no man worth marrying would marry an ugly girl who has to work for a living instead of being sheltered in her parents' manor sighing and being virtuous and useless until some man comes to marry her. Even Sancho refers to his mother as a whore, and Don Quixote's niece and housekeeper are given about half a brain to split between the two of them.

The fact that Dorotea is said to be "clever" and "quick" does not keep her from groveling at the feet of the man who wronged her, forgiving in an instant he who took her chastity and then drove her into exile because of her shame. If a man had done that to me, I'd castrate him or kill him before begging him to keep the promises he made in order to get into my panties, and certainly wouldn't want to marry and spend the rest of my life with him. Cervantes' claims he was moved by her pleas and the state in which she had come to be because of him and repented and swore to do right by her, but I can't help but think that as soon as they're married and out of sight of their current companions he'll do the same to some other young maiden, leaving Dorotea even more shamed and starting the cycle anew with someone else. I'm sorry, but I just can't see such a philanderer changing his tune just because of some tears. He purposefully married his friend's betrothed, for crying out loud, and almost killed her when he found out that she loved Cardenio, which he obviously already knew because Cardenio had told him as much, but he had to have her because he's a spoiled bastard who gets what he wants and disregards the consequences (as of yet, no punishment has come upon him for any of the sins he has committed, and yet he is now seen in as amiable a light as Cardenio).

I also hate the way everyone is so quick to cry. I mean, really? They read a novel, everyone (including the men) cries. They hear the adventures of some wayward man or woman and find they are "unfortunate," everyone cries. Something happy happens, everyone cries. I'm going to cry if I have to read one more person's sob story and hear how everyone who heard was "moved to tears at the beauty and truth of the unfortunate [insert person's name here]'s troubles, and everyone vowed to do whatever they could to set them back in their rightful place in the world." Did people really cry this much in the 17th century? Or, more likely, is this a common device used in romances and chivalric literature which I am now positive I will never, ever read?

Otherwise, I'm looking forward to see what happens next, and how the plot to cure Don Quixote plays out. I am also curious to see when Aldonza comes in, because I know she has to play a large role somewhere, or she would not have been made one of the main characters in the musical Man of La Mancha. I realize that play isn't completely true to the book, but I can't imagine they used stories that weren't fairly pivotal to the novel's plot. I'm assuming we'll see her in Part II, but I can only guess. I'll keep on plowing through, sighs and crying and all. :-P



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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
Bravissimo! I commend you for reading so closely the "Tale of Foolish Curiosity." It's not easy to stick with it throughout its length. Did you notice that at one point the narrator gushes how great it is that the manuscript contains not only the adventures of DQ, but all the wonderful stories people within it tell as well? Cervantes giving himself a plug. Another time he has a character say that the Don is so crazy that no author could be genius enough to capture his qualities--another pat on his own back. But in any event, all you say about the sentimental conventions of the day and the subservience of women are true. For me, this serves to underscore how much Don Quixote doesn't seek to be anything but a comedic, mildly satiric book of adventures. It isn't social or religioius criticism. It isn't necessarily simple in its narrative format, though--actually a little dizzying--and that is where it achieves some depth.


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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
I was actually somewhat interested in the "Tale of Foolish Curiosity" until I realized what its conclusion would be and then how long it took to finally get there. But there is another example of a woman who is only valued for her beauty and "virtue." I can't even imagine why Enselmo would even need to do this, especially when his friend is trying to tell him how stupid it is (don't look a gift horse in the mouth, is the proverb that comes to mind), and then goes through with it anyway. Both men are stupid, because the one doesn't know what he has and won't be satisfied until it's gone, and the other knows what will happen but complies anyway. If I were that poor girl I'd have washed my hands of both of them and become a nun.

I'm not saying that men have gotten any smarter, as I've actually seen this kind of "test" happen in my own experiences, and the outcome is usually the same as in Cervantes' story. If you love someone and you trust them and their "virtue," why test it? If you have a diamond, you don't try to cut glass with it or hammer it until it shatters, if you can tell it is pure by every other method, why press your luck? It's just stupid, and I can tell you with as much knowledge as I have of women and men, that if you were to ask a woman to do this same test, she would refuse, because women (as far as I have seen) seem to know better than to tempt a man, probably because they have been hurt before by men who get away with philandering more than women do (even now). So yes, that story held my interest but drove me crazy.

I've also never seen anyone moved by tears as much as these characters. If the technology of today had existed during Cervantes' time and the plights of hundreds, thousands, millions of people could be heard daily, even hourly, if these same characters would be as moved to compassion and pledges of undying support as they are in their own isolated century. It's so hard to think that simple tears and unfortunate stories could cause such strong emotion and commitment when we know, today, how many millions of people are suffering far worse than any person who would have access to one of us to tell us their story personally. Of course we understand that they are suffering, but we don't devote our lives to helping every person who comes to us with a sad story and a wet face. It's just ridiculous.

And I still want to see Don Fernando punished for his douchebaggery, if I'm allowed to use that word on this site (if not I'll promptly edit it). He hasn't redeemed himself, in my eyes, and I'll be pretty sore at Cerventes if something resembling justice doesn't come his way.



Wed Apr 07, 2010 10:42 pm
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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
bleachededen wrote:
I've also never seen anyone moved by tears as much as these characters. If the technology of today had existed during Cervantes' time and the plights of hundreds, thousands, millions of people could be heard daily, even hourly, if these same characters would be as moved to compassion and pledges of undying support as they are in their own isolated century. It's so hard to think that simple tears and unfortunate stories could cause such strong emotion and commitment when we know, today, how many millions of people are suffering far worse than any person who would have access to one of us to tell us their story personally. Of course we understand that they are suffering, but we don't devote our lives to helping every person who comes to us with a sad story and a wet face. It's just ridiculous.

That's a tough problem to solve. We don't seem to see around us people acting as floridly sentimental as the charcters in this story, so we might wonder whether people were actually different back then, had more extreme emotions. Of course, I wouldn't know for sure one way or the other. We often hear that a particular ethnic goup has a tendency to be volatile, gloomy, or some other quality, and while most of this is likely to be plain stereotyping, maybe there could be a germ of fact. What I suspect is that we're seeing the sentimental style of popular storytelling that persists over time. Again I wouldn't know for certain, but don't Harlequin romances go in pretty heavily for telling us about the affective states of the characters? That's the key technique, they tell us rather than letting the action convey an emotional impact--probably because the story is too weak to do that! The opposite is the bare and powerful statement of emotion, such as the NT's "Jesus wept" or the many stark and unvarnished emotions of the OT characters. A while back, I reread Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. I found her technique in the book to rely too heavily on assuring us how deeply all the characters felt, how noble they were and how perfect. It tired me out.
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And I still want to see Don Fernando punished for his douchebaggery, if I'm allowed to use that word on this site (if not I'll promptly edit it). He hasn't redeemed himself, in my eyes, and I'll be pretty sore at Cerventes if something resembling justice doesn't come his way.

Yeah, douchebaggery--great coinage. I still see this story as I would one of Shakespeare's comedies, where the characters get more good stuff than they may deserve in the end (as opposed to tragedies, where they get more bad than they deserve). Or maybe this story is like one of S's problem comedies.


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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
Oh my God, I've finally reached the second part of Don Quixote! I was beginning to think I'd never get there. Now we'll see what Cervantes does with the story of Don Quixote ten years after he wrote the story of his first two sallies. This had better be good. ;)



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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
I'm wondering if the 'weeping' is written into it because of the 'demands of the day'.

Maybe it's part of that 'morality' thing that had to be in plays . . . maybe the same thing applied to books.



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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
Let's not forget that one of the reasons DQ is such a classic is that its main theme is so universal: making peace with a world we can't understand or accept.

Who hasn't struggled to do so? I know I have. And so did Hamlet.

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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
I am growing ever more tired of this book. I can't wait to finally finish it and read something else.

I appreciate what I have learned from it so far, and its influence on all other writing, but it's now become so repetitive and tedious that if it weren't for Grossman's very readable translation, I'd have given up by now. I'm mostly finishing it now out of stubbornness, but I am no longer enjoying any of it, and find myself getting angry at almost all of the characters and their actions and want to shake some damn sense into them.

Don Quixote's mistreating of Sancho is making me angry, because poor Sancho is his most loyal follower and the only one who isn't trying to trick him in some way for his own amusement, and yet every time Sancho opens his mouth, Don Quixote insults him and calls him names and I just want to slap the knight with an iron glove and tell him to stow it.

Sancho really needs to lean to keep his mouth shut, to avoid insults and to learn that he knows nothing about anything, and although I don't agree with the Don's insults and treatment of Sancho, I, too, am getting quite sick of proverbs, especially when they have to be explained to me in a footnote because the translation from Spanish to English wasn't perfect.

I hate the duke and duchess, and the priest and Sanson Carrasco and everyone else who use Quixote's madness for their own pleasure. I don't understand why they don't just cart him off to an asylum or a jail, where he clearly belongs, but instead play with him as if he were a toy. It's painful to read and angers me because these are supposedly "good people," who are well born and well educated and whatnot, and yet they have no idea how to treat others. We don't go around indulging schizophrenic's delusions for our own amusement, and anyone who did would not be looked upon favorably, as they are in Don Quixote's world.

I think I'm just not feeling the true differences between the modern age and Cervantes' time, and that he is probably commenting on the behavior I have just mentioned, showing that people are people and treacherous and mean, high born or low born alike. I just want Don Quixote to snap out of it or die already, because I'm really sick of his antics, and the layered narration Cervantes uses to get himself into his novel (I'm really sick of being reminded that Cide Hamete found and translated the manuscript I am reading, and the praise he often gives to the writing style -- that's right, Cervantes, keep patting yourself on the back, you're so awesome, go on, go on).

I can't wait to read something with spaceships and jokes I can actually understand without footnotes.

When will it end? :(



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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
thanks bleachededen, blogging the blah. Some one earlier suggested we should just read part one of Don Quixote for now, and return to Part 2 in a year. That gave me an excuse to stop reading at the end of Part 1, while I work up the energy for my tilt at part 2.

Cervantes is a great master novelist, and there are depths of style and strategy in Don Quixote that readers can easily miss. The intent can be covered over by our thoughts about our own situation and our comparison to familiar reference points, for example slapstick comedy, as we read. That is why I compare reading this book to Cervantes' parable of the windmills; just as Don Q saw giants, we see in the book what we want to see and are capable of seeing. We all read with our own internal dialogue giving a silent running commentary. Our capacity to listen and learn is partly a function of how powerful our own self-talk is and our capacity to switch off our internal dialogue.

Your comment about the casual cruelty towards the insane is interesting, and shows the humane ethical intent of the book, that really when light is shone on such conduct we can see that people should be treated with dignity even if they are a few marbles short of a full set. It is like bear baiting. Nowadays people regard it as intolerably cruel because of the malicious delight in the suffering of others, but we still tolerate horrible cruelty to pigs and chickens in the name of commercial agriculture, just because the motive is profit rather than malice.



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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
bleachededen wrote:
I am growing ever more tired of this book. I can't wait to finally finish it and read something else.
When will it end? :(

Whether a book was written last month or is 400 years old and has been aging in a barrel and is now commonly referred to as a classic, the process of reacting to it and assessing its qualities is the same. I like your fearless approach to this classic book. We can see that the reactions to it are no less diverse than they would be if we were talking about the latest Ian McEwan or Jodi Piccoult effort. I don't want to seem peevish, but labeling a book a classic and then asking for the reasons why is a little bit of a set-up. It's okay for us to look at it as if we're unaware that it wears this crown of a classic novel.


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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
Peevish?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2002/ma ... ties.books
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News
World news
Don Quixote is the world's best book say the world's top authors

Angelique Chrisafis, arts correspondent
The Guardian, Wednesday 8 May 2002 16.21 BST
Don Quixote, the tale of a Spanish knight driven mad by reading too many chivalric romances, was yesterday voted the best book of all time in a survey of around 100 of the world's best authors.
"If there is one novel you should read before you die, it is Don Quixote," the Nigerian author Ben Okri said at the Norwegian Nobel Institute as he announced the results of history's most expansive authors' poll. "Don Quixote has the most wonderful and elaborated story, yet it is simple."

Around 100 well-known authors from 54 countries voted for the "most meaningful book of all time" in a poll organised by editors at the Norwegian Book Clubs in Oslo.

Voters included Doris Lessing, Salman Rushdie, Nadine Gordimer, Wole Soyinka, Seamus Heaney, Carlos Fuentes and Norman Mailer. Isabel Allende boycotted the exercise on the grounds that she objected to "book surveys".

The Swedish children's author Astrid Lindgren managed to vote just before her death in January, and her book Pippi Longstocking made the list.

Lessing said the authors aimed to spark a thirst for reading in a young generation that preferred TV and Playstations. "They should be called educated barbarians," she said.

Miguel de Cervantes' tale of misguided heroism gained 50% more votes than any other book, eclipsing works by Shakespeare, Homer and Tolstoy.

Ten authors got more than one book on to the list, which was not ranked. After Cervantes, Fyodor Dostoevsky emerged as the most worthwhile read with four books listed: Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, The Possessed and The Brothers Karamazov.

The only Shakespeare plays the authors agreed on were Hamlet, King Lear and Othello.

The Bard was matched by Franz Kafka, who was virtually unknown during his lifetime. His three angst-ridden tales of grotesque alienation on the list were The Trial, The Castle and the Complete Stories.

Three works by Leo Tolstoy made it: War and Peace, Anna Karenina and The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories.

The American William Faulkner and the Briton Virginia Woolf both scored twice, along with the Colombian Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who declined to vote.

Living writers were few and far between . Notable examples were Doris Lessing - whose Golden Notebook featured - and Salman Rushdie, Chinua Achebe and Toni Morrison.

Alf van der Hagen, an editor with the Norwegian Book Clubs, said: "The unique element to this list is that we didn't just ask authors from Europe or the US, we took a worldwide survey for the first time."

He said more than two-thirds of the 100 titles were written by Europeans, almost half were written last century and 11 were by women.



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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
Okay, Robert, I credit you for a good find. But I'm still wondering what necessary conclusion about the book follows from this poll, if any does in your opinion. Are you implying a version of the argument from authority?


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Post Re: Why is Don Quixote such a classic?
Assessments of book quality are subjective. The fact that a poll of the world's greatest authors ranked Don Quixote as the best novel ever provides a reasonable basis to enquire as to what may be good about this book. The conclusion I draw from this poll is that Don Quixote has deeper content, in terms of social commentary, than is sometimes seen if we just focus on character and plot.



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Oliver Twist - by Charles DickensSense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

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