Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sun Nov 23, 2014 5:45 am

<< Week of November 23, 2014 >>
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
23 Day Month

24 Day Month

25 Day Month

26 Day Month

27 Day Month

28 Day Month

29 Day Month





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next
What is your relationship with music? 
Author Message
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post What is your relationship with music?
The first chapter of Musicophilia has led me to wonder what other people think and feel about music. In that chapter, people who have only vaguely liked music or showed little interest in it at all have traumatic accidents or neurological problems which in turn bring out a strong passion for music. I have always had a strong passion for music without having any strange or traumatic experiences, but I wonder what other people think.

How do you feel about music?



Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:49 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
The Great Gabsby


Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 60
Location: Chicago
Thanks: 6
Thanked: 19 times in 11 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
I'm so glad you started this topic, it will be interesting to get everyone's responses!

I have also always been passionate about music. As a child, I constantly listened to the radio (mostly the golden oldies radio station, as well as the rock stations). It didn't take long for me to learn the words to the heavy rotation songs, as well as the names of the artists. Getting a dual deck tape player meant that I could start recording my favorite songs from the radio, and I quickly amassed a lot of tapes. Of course, I borrowed tapes from everyone I knew to make copies, and my mom started buying tapes for me as well. I got a cd player at some point, which was pretty awesome.

By high school, I started to learn as much as I could about the bands I liked by reading biographies, magazines, and anything else I could find. The internet changed everything: I could sample music from bands I had heard of but never really heard, I could seek out information about bands, I even began to put my music on the computer. I now have a 15,000 song iTunes library, and I listen to about 70 songs a day. I only keep full albums on my computer, because in my opinion that is the complete work of art. My favorite bands/artists, with fave albums in parentheses, are Led Zeppelin (II, Houses of the Holy), Radiohead (OK Computer, The Bends), The Beatles (Abbey Road, Revolver), The Clash (London Calling, Combat Rock), Bob Dylan (Blonde on Blonde, Blood on the Tracks), The Doors (eponymous), and Sam Cooke (Ain't That Good News, Twistin' the Night Away).

I also like to play musical instruments. I've been sounding out things on the piano since I can remember, but I've never actually learned to play (that's not completely true: I can play a few songs by heart, more by ear, and many songs by sheet music, but I'm still terrible at technique and sight reading). I did learn to play trumpet when I was 10 and flute when I was 12. I still play both instruments to this day; I especially love to play jazz trumpet. I live in Chicago, so I have the joy of being able to see live jazz or blues pretty much any day of the week. I've recently taken up the guitar, which is challenging but fun.

Near the top of my "to be read" list is I'm With the Band: Confessions of a Groupie. I think that might make for good vacation reading.



The following user would like to thank caseyjo for this post:
bleachededen
Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:53 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Thanks, caseyjo. I like some of the same artists/albums (both of those Radiohead albums are my two favorites, as well).

I like that you look up biographies of musicians you like, as well. I have done this for a few of the bands I really like, but for the most part, I care less about the musician than I do the music. With a few exceptions, I barely even know the names of any of the members in a band I like, and I'm quite alright with that because the music is more important than the image or the politics. In this day and age it's hard to ignore things like image (with music videos being the standard), but I still focus much more on the music than any other aspect, even if I know the band is trying to make a statement about something.

I can also forgive political positions (generally) when I like a band's music but not their stance on some issue that happens to be big. If it's something that I stand firmly against, I obviously will think twice about whether or not I care to align myself with a band that is in that position, but short of obviously racist or anti-feminist/civil rights bands, if I like the music enough, I can forget about the artist's views. A good example of this is that even though I know that Richard Wagner was an anti-semite and Nazi supporter, I still love his music, especially parts of Die Valkyrie (the second opera in the Ring cycle), because his message doesn't spill into the music, and the music is beautiful. But I won't listen to a band like Skrewdriver, who at one point were just a normal Oi band, but after a lineup change, became totally anti-semitic and no self-respecting skinhead (original skinheads, not Nazi skinheads, you can wiki this if you need to see the difference) or punk listens to Skrewdriver anymore, even the one clean album, because of their hateful new turn.

But my point is I have a lot of respect for that kind of need to know everything about a band, because then you really know what you're listening to and who is giving it to you. My boyfriend is like that, so he's often like a music encyclopedia -- if you want to know what band Johnny Rotten was in after the Sex Pistols, he'll be able to tell you that and then some. I have that kind of lust for knowledge in other aspects of my life, but not in band bios.

caseyjo wrote:
Near the top of my "to be read" list is I'm With the Band: Confessions of a Groupie. I think that might make for good vacation reading.


That book does sounds like it would be interesting. Let me know what you thought of it whenever you get around to reading it. :)



Wed Mar 24, 2010 10:18 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Music, for me, is a living, breathing entity that never leaves my body, even if I could ever want it to. My mother is a concert pianist and music history professor at a local university, and I was raised with music the way most people are raised with food. I could read music as soon as I could read English, and I started playing piano and learning music theory around 5 or 6 years old. I devoured all of the music my parents listened to, every classical composer you can think of, Simon and Garfunkel, musicals of all kinds, folk music from various countries, gospel music, hymns, spirituals, nursery rhymes, Jewish prayers at Synagogue. I was a sponge. I just absorbed it all, took it into my being, even if I had no possible way of knowing what any of it meant.

I attended many concerts at the music department at my mom's school. My mom's favorite story to tell people (and mine, too) is from when I was about 4 years old. My mom's colleague was conducting the university orchestra playing Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherezade. This happened to be my favorite classical piece of all time, and was proud to be able to pronounce its name. When it begins, there is a triumphant start and then a pregnant pause before it continues more softly. During this pause, I pulled on my mom's arm and said, loudly, "That's Scheherezade!" I was so proud. The conductor, my mom's friend, turned around and said, "If there will be no further interruptions, we will begin again." My mom took me outside for the rest of the concert, but I didn't care because I could still hear the music, and I reveled in the sweet tones of my favorite piece of music. I didn't know I'd done anything wrong. All I knew was they were playing my song. What a beautiful moment.

I joined band in elementary school. I wanted to play drums or trumpet, but my parents thought drums were too loud and my mother swore she'd never let her children be brass players (it's a musician insider snobbery; brass players are "known" to be pompous and arrogant), so I chose flute, and moved on to piccolo in high school. I was a member of a world reknowned children's choir and then the junior version of the well-reknowned adult choir in a neighboring city, and in those choirs I learned pretty much every sacred choral work ever written, pieces by Benjamin Britten and Aaron Copland. I sang with chamber ensembles and full orchestras. I was even in a production of Puccini's opera Turandot when I was about 11, because of the choir's connection with the city's opera company. I can't even put into words how amazing the experience was, and I'm not even sure I fully appreciated how special and unique it really was back then. I wish that I could go back and feel the impact of that experience with the understanding of its importance that I know now.

In high school, I started voice lessons and learned opera arias, wrote piano compositions and won awards at competitions. I performed in musicals at the local community theater, as well as at my high school. I was in marching band, concert band, jazz band. I was set to major in vocal performance in college, and auditioned at several before giving up the dream when I was rejected from all of them. I had been having problems with my singing, which my mother and I attribute to my voice teacher's unusual and controversial teaching methods. I was disheartened and probably more than that, in retrospect, but too involved in teenage drama to notice how much that would affect me.

My second love has always been literature, as you may have guessed to find me here. I sucked up books the way I sucked up music, and I usually finish books within a few days, 2 weeks tops, anymore than that and I'm either too busy or disinterested and I give up and try something else. Music has always played a part in reading, too, because as a poetry major and a linguistics nut, I find music in language so for me the love of reading and the love of music go hand in hand.

Music can make or break me. Music clings to people. I once hated Jimi Hendrix solely because my closest friend in 8th grade and future (now former) boyfriend wanted to take drugs to experiment like him. Now I can't listen to Nirvana without thinking of him, because when we started dating in high school, I fell in love with Nirvana, Hendrix, The Doors, etc. as well as with him. When I find music I like, I don't just listen, I fall in love. I am known to listen to the same song over and over, loving it more and more each time. Music can trigger depression episodes for me, but it can also bring me out of one, depending on what it is. I sing showtunes anywhere, anytime, and I know some really old, obscure songs that my dad's parents would have listened to. Right now I'm listening to "Make 'em Laugh" from Singin' in the Rain, and as I imagine Donald O'Connor jump around and make faces, I'm in love with it all over again.

I guess what I'm saying is that music isn't just a part of me, it is me. I'm never without a song in my head, and I don't think a day has gone by since I learned how to sing that I don't sing at least some part of a song. Music oozes through me, and I infect other people with my musical germs. My boyfriend always hated musicals before, now he can sing some of them with me. It's not that I forced him or he listened against his will, it's just that my enthusiasm showed him a side of music he'd never considered looking at. I do love to make others feel what I feel when I listen to something. That is true joy.

Music is my soulmate, music is my soul, music is me. I love music.

:love:



Thu Mar 25, 2010 1:07 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Creative Writing Student


Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 33
Location: Long Beach, CA
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Music is a constant in my life, every day, from waking to sleep. I get woken up by Classical KUSC FM in Los Angeles and go to sleep to it. In between I listen to KUSC on the way to work and at work I have my iPod (105 GB at this time) plugged into my computer and listen to a wide variety of stuff. Most of it is classical, although I don't like to listen to opera, but there's also a large part dedicated to 60s/70s music -- Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, CSNY, John Mayall, Joni Mitchell...stuff I musically teethed on.
My classical taste covers the whole spectrum of solo instrument/chamber/orchestral - Bach through John Adams. Heavy on the Mozart, Dvorak, Beethoven, Schubert, Shostakovich.
Where I DON'T go with music is smooth jazz, hip hop, rap, etc. And the 80s never did much for me...except for Fleetwood Mac for some reason.
I also play guitar, which reflects a lot of what I listen to in the rock/blues field. I've got 41 years behind the guitar and I'm still learning.


_________________
A likely story.


The following user would like to thank tomwhite56 for this post:
bleachededen
Thu Mar 25, 2010 12:38 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Thanks for sharing, tom. I think we have a lot of music in common, and I'm glad to hear that even after 41 years of playing, you consider yourself to be "still learning." This is the mark of a true musician -- you can always get better, you are never 100% perfect and will always try to learn new techniques and styles. I hope that's going well for you. :)



Thu Mar 25, 2010 2:25 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Creative Writing Student


Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 33
Location: Long Beach, CA
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Wow, eden, that is some history -- sorry I hadn't read it before. I love what a range of music you love and how much music means to you. I think we do have lots in common musically. What's ironic for me is that until my son came along (he's picked up guitar as well but his ear is somewhat tenuous) I'm the only musician our family ever had, to my knowledge. I don't know where it comes from. But I'm grateful for it every single day of my life.

When you were in the children's chorus, did you ever do Britten's "Friday Afternoons"?


_________________
A likely story.


Thu Mar 25, 2010 4:15 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Post count, I stab at thee!

BookTalk.org Moderator

Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 3326
Location: Michigan
Thanks: 1257
Thanked: 992 times in 730 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
I have my Ipod running the entire day that i am at work.

I love music. It can make you sing, laugh, brood, or create.

A few years back i discovered that i am not too bad with a guitar, and that has been a lot of fun.


_________________
In the absence of God, I found Man.
-Guillermo Del Torro

Science flies you to the moon. Religion flies you into buildings.

Have you tried that? Looking for answers?
Or have you been content to be terrified of a thing you know nothing about?

Is this the virtue of faith? To never change your mind: especially when you should?

Young Earth Creationists take offense at the idea that we have a common heritage with other animals. Why is being the descendant of a mud golem any better?


Thu Mar 25, 2010 4:52 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
tomwhite56 wrote:
Wow, eden, that is some history -- sorry I hadn't read it before. I love what a range of music you love and how much music means to you. I think we do have lots in common musically. What's ironic for me is that until my son came along (he's picked up guitar as well but his ear is somewhat tenuous) I'm the only musician our family ever had, to my knowledge. I don't know where it comes from. But I'm grateful for it every single day of my life.

When you were in the children's chorus, did you ever do Britten's "Friday Afternoons"?


No, sadly. We did a few pieces from his A Ceremony of Carols, as we sang at a lot of religious and Christmas events.



Thu Mar 25, 2010 5:47 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Experienced

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 116
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Thanks: 38
Thanked: 28 times in 22 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
eden:

I am duly impressed and very jealous of your relationship with music! Phenomenal! However I would like to point out an error in your post above. You stated that Richard Wagner supported the Nazis. You got the cart before the horse. Indeed Wagner was an anti-Semite and had some rather unpleasant views, but he did not support the Nazis. Wagner died in 1883. The advent of National Socialism was in the early 1920's. Wagner did provided something of an artistic and mystical philosophy for National Socialism and Adolf Hitler in particular. The Ring is often associated with a magical German kingdom and seeded many of Hitler's goals for the Third Reich. You can read more here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Wagner


_________________
“Being Irish he had an abiding sense of tragedy which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.” W. B. Yeats

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

"In answer to the question of why it happened, I offer the modest proposal that our Universe is simply one of those things which happen from time to time." Edward P. Tryon


The following user would like to thank Veneer for this post:
bleachededen
Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:46 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Veneer, thank you so much for correcting my misconstrued facts! I always knew that Wagner was an anti-Semite and that Hitler loved his music, but I'm terrible at dates when it comes to composers, and so I assumed that Wagner was around during Hitler's time. The waltzes of Richard Strauss were also used in the Third Reich, mostly to welcome the Jews into the concentration camps, as what I have gleaned to be a way to make them feel calm while they separated the weak from the strong and sent the former to the gas chambers. Please correct me if I'm wrong, again. It is always good to learn the truths of things I have been misinformed on.



Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:57 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Experienced

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 116
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Thanks: 38
Thanked: 28 times in 22 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
eden,

Your welcome on the correction, and you were not totally wrong just had the history flipped. I can not verify the use of Strauss at the camps although it certainly would be within the realm of possibility. I am not particularly really well read on the Nazi era. Here is another interesting article regarding the music of Nazi Germany.

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jso ... agner.html

I found the information on Orff interesting. I read somewhere that the Nazi's were going to ban In Trutina for it's eroticism. It is a beautiful piece. I once seen Torvill and Dean ice dance to the piece and wept.


_________________
“Being Irish he had an abiding sense of tragedy which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.” W. B. Yeats

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

"In answer to the question of why it happened, I offer the modest proposal that our Universe is simply one of those things which happen from time to time." Edward P. Tryon


Thu Apr 01, 2010 11:38 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Experienced

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 116
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Thanks: 38
Thanked: 28 times in 22 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Going back to the question posed in this thread, what is my relationship to music? A very odd one which overtime has devolved into basically silence is golden, with rare periods of intense listening. Yet music is one of my interests in life but an interest (alas like the rest of my interests) that I merely dabble in.

Any particular piece of music falls into two narrow categories with me: I love it--I despise it. There is no mediocre hopper to dump things in between. Unfortunately about 1% of the worlds music falls into the love category with 99% falling into the hate category. Listening to a radio is something I do only when it is foisted upon me and I can usually tune it out. On rare occasions, I will turn on the radio in the car...two minutes of channel surfing and off it goes again. Friends tell me that I should get satellite radio, why? I can NOT listen to the AM and FM for free, why pay a monthly fee for a service I'll never use? Yeah but you can pick your genre? Fine, but when I despise 90% of the music in any given genre, and about 90% of the time I am not in the mood to listen to music I do like, what in the hell is satellite radio going to do for me but lighten my wallet?

And yet there are those pieces...exceedingly rare, the Shaker melody from Copeland's Appalachian Spring, The Children's Song by Oystein Sevag, In Trutina by Carl Orff, the second movement from Shostakovitch's Symphony # 5 (unfortunately preceded and followed by ostentatious blather required to keep poor Shosty alive...Stalin was not convinced that Shostakovitch's music properly reflected the greatness of the USSR--not an enviable position to be in) a great deal of Phillip Aaberg's older piano works, a rare George Winston and Liz Story, with a tiny smattering of Led Zepplin, The Who, Boston (one of the great misfortunes in life), Ahmed Jamal (stuff from the 60s), and some pieces written by Hildegarde Von Bingen. I can sit here right now and play the Shaker melody in my head and when I get to the full orchestral part tears will well up in my eyes.

Lest, you think me insane, (perhaps not inaccurate) I have MS, and a looming love for melancholy punctuated by tears seems to be one of my symptoms. Going to funerals is real pain in the ass...I can burst into tears for someone that I don't know. Rage is other symptom and I must apply a lot of effort to control it, which for most part I have been successful, but at the cost of seemingly making me more sensitive to melancholy. Sadly beautiful in music or art resonates in my somewhat loony head. Bernini's Ecstasy Of St Theresa, Sargent's Lady Agnew, and some of Andrew Wyeth's paintings can transport me off to the blue lands of melancholy where the days are deliciously rainy and the moon always full. At times nature's beauty can do the same. I once viewed a small clump of bluets swaying gently in a warm late April breeze and it was one of those oceanic moments (that I live for) where the delicate vulnerability of such a tiny beautiful flower touched my soul.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Teresabernini.JPG

http://www.hiltonpond.org/images/Bluets01.jpg

Perhaps to further convince one of my madness, for the past three months when I have listened to music, it has been limited to Bartok's three piano concertos with the second being my favorite and the second movement of the second concerto being one of my rarities...and I don't know why. Bartok is horribly discordant.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQbozcIN ... re=related

When I stop and really think about most music, do I actually hate it? No, I guess not, I would just prefer not to hear it. Silence is golden.


_________________
“Being Irish he had an abiding sense of tragedy which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.” W. B. Yeats

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

"In answer to the question of why it happened, I offer the modest proposal that our Universe is simply one of those things which happen from time to time." Edward P. Tryon


The following user would like to thank Veneer for this post:
bleachededen
Fri Apr 02, 2010 7:59 am
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Veneer, again, thank you so much for sharing. I can understand your distaste for 90% of the music you hear, and I find those that you do enjoy or that move you to be particularly fascinating choices. I also love Shostakovich, as I tend to be a fan of most 20th century Russian composers (Prokofiev being my favorite), and Orff's music is indeed powerful enough to bring one to tears, despite the erotic lyrics (which you can't understand without a guide anyway, because they're in Latin :-P). I also find it interesting that you love a specific Bartok piece, even though you profess not to like the discordancy that pretty much defines him (he makes excellent use of the 12 tone scale: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve-tone_technique, which I found interesting to work with when learning advanced theory).

The Shaker melody from Appalachian Spring (which I assume is "Simple Gifts") is another one that is very moving. I've been a Copland fan my entire life, and love to see his influence on the other great American composers such as Bernstein and even Sondheim, so you need not fear that you are alone in falling into melancholy or bursting into tears just from hearing a tune: I share these same qualities, even though I have a wider range of music to cause me to do so. I don't believe I could go a day without music, but I can understand your need for silence most of the time, because sometimes, when you are prone to fits of great emotion, music will only enhance the emotion and can cause legitimate pain to the listener. Such is its power, as I have come to learn over my lifetime thus far, always full of music. Many times I prefer to listen to cartoons or movies as background noise when I can't take silence, because music would be too distracting from what I am trying to write or read. Movies and television I can generally ignore, but music draws me in and forces me to pay attention to it, and also can pull my emotions in ways they weren't going on their own. And as I said, sometimes when I am too emotional, I can't listen to anything, and silence is, indeed, golden.

Thank you for sharing your views. I found them fascinating and educational, and I hope to hear more from you in other discussions on this site. :)



The following user would like to thank bleachededen for this post:
Veneer
Fri Apr 02, 2010 1:14 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Experienced

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 116
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Thanks: 38
Thanked: 28 times in 22 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: What is your relationship with music?
Schoenberg and the 12 tone scale! Those are fighting words! I hate the 12 tone scale, or at least I think I do. Bearing in mind that I am not very knowledgeable in music, I never realized that Bartok worked in 12 tone. Anything that I realized was 12 tone always sounded like pure crap to me. Yet in reading the article I see that a lot of 20th century composers worked in 12 tone. I should pay more attention to it.

Russians? Stravinsky is probably my favorite in the 20th century although Rimsky Korsakov would be my favorite 19th century Russian, and Le Coq d'Or my favorite piece, followed by Scheherazade and the Capriccio Espagnol.

Yes, "Simple Gifts" is the proper name of the Shaker melody. Speaking of Sondheim, he died last week and I was listening to NPR (in one of my rare fits of radio listening--but it was the news, not music). They played a 30 second piece that had "pretty women" in the lyrics. When I got home I tried to find such a piece on YouTube and couldn't find anything that sounded like it. Would you be familiar with the piece?

Very interesting commentary on your preference for movies or TV for background noise. I am quite the opposite, I find any background noise to be distracting if I am reading or working.

Thanks for your kind comments on my rather bizarre relationship with music.


_________________
“Being Irish he had an abiding sense of tragedy which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.” W. B. Yeats

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

"In answer to the question of why it happened, I offer the modest proposal that our Universe is simply one of those things which happen from time to time." Edward P. Tryon


Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:10 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

Recent Posts 
Why Do So Many Have Trouble Believing In Evolution?

Sun Nov 23, 2014 4:59 am

Movie Nerd

If you were God, would you give humanity moral free will?

Sun Nov 23, 2014 4:57 am

Movie Nerd

Visit To A Doctor

Sun Nov 23, 2014 4:47 am

mightynvaliant

Renewable energy - the old chestnut, puréed

Sun Nov 23, 2014 4:17 am

lehelvandor

Do you have a quote to share? Funny? Positive? Thought Provoking?

Sun Nov 23, 2014 12:22 am

Suzanne

Male protagonist in a world ruled by women

Sun Nov 23, 2014 12:14 am

Chris OConnor

Many thanks for having me, Joe

Sun Nov 23, 2014 12:07 am

Suzanne

Giveaway: The Mistress of Desire & The Orchid Lover

Sat Nov 22, 2014 10:49 pm

J A Jackson

Why is there something and not nothing?

Sat Nov 22, 2014 10:27 pm

Interbane

"What Book Changed Your Mind?"

Sat Nov 22, 2014 9:15 pm

Hal Henry

"Logical Fallacies: The Key to Proving Christians Wrong"

Sat Nov 22, 2014 6:45 pm

ManofEcstasy

Is God the epitome of both good and evil?

Sat Nov 22, 2014 6:30 pm

ManofEcstasy

COSMOS - Episode 5 (more quasi subliminal propaganda)

Sat Nov 22, 2014 5:52 pm

Chris OConnor

How do you read a boring book?

Sat Nov 22, 2014 5:11 pm

Movie Nerd

What are you reading right now?

Sat Nov 22, 2014 5:10 pm

Movie Nerd

The "Recent Topics" block now shows 20 posts instead of 10

Sat Nov 22, 2014 4:59 pm

Chris OConnor

How important is the news?

Sat Nov 22, 2014 4:55 pm

Crystalline

Faith closes the mind. It is pure idol worship.

Sat Nov 22, 2014 4:33 pm

Interbane

Back! Will Be More Active

Sat Nov 22, 2014 4:18 pm

PoeticJustin

Wearable Fitness and Health Tracking Devices

Sat Nov 22, 2014 2:01 pm

Crystalline


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books

Poll

Yes  66%  [2]
No  33%  [1]
Total votes: 3

Books by New Authors


Top Posters

Of all time: Chris OConnor (14173), Interbane (5580), DWill (4962), stahrwe (4610), Robert Tulip (4231), Mr. Pessimistic (3542), johnson1010 (3326), geo (3254), ant (3061), Penelope (2969), Saffron (2859), Suzanne (2477), Frank 013 (2021), Dissident Heart (1796), bleachededen (1680), President Camacho (1614), Ophelia (1543), Dexter (1448), tat tvam asi (1298), youkrst (1287)

Of the last 24 hrs: Movie Nerd (21), Chris OConnor (18), ant (15), lehelvandor (15), geo (11), johnson1010 (8), ManofEcstasy (7), Crystalline (6), Interbane (6), LanDroid (6), Dexter (4), Hal Henry (4), PoeticJustin (4), Suzanne (4), danimorg62 (4), Cattleman (2), Alan Stroe (1), heledd (1), DWill (1), Gnostic Bishop (1)




BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
Atheist Mind, Humanist Heart - by Lex Bayer and John FigdorSense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2014. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank