Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Thu Jul 31, 2014 6:29 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Waking Up 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie


Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 825
Location: Wyse Fork, NC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Waking Up
The title page of the first edition of Walden contains as motto: "I do not propose to write an ode to dejection, but to brag as lustily as chanticleer in the morning, standing on his roost, if only to wake my neighbors up." But what is this waking up? And how does it occur?

To wake up is to become aware of features of existence that the sleeper ordinarily overlooks. Walden is an exercise book in waking up -- An American Book of Koans. It doesn't have to be read this way, and most people miss the mystique. Practice in Walden and apply to the world.

Quote:
1.62 By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising. I had already bought the shanty of James Collins, an Irishman who worked on the Fitchburg Railroad, for boards. James Collins' shanty was considered an uncommonly fine one. When I called to see it he was not at home. I walked about the outside, at first unobserved from within, the window was so deep and high. It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap. The roof was the soundest part, though a good deal warped and made brittle by the sun. Doorsill there was none, but a perennial passage for the hens under the door board. Mrs. C. came to the door and asked me to view it from the inside. The hens were driven in by my approach. It was dark, and had a dirt floor for the most part, dank, clammy, and aguish, only here a board and there a board which would not bear removal. She lighted a lamp to show me the inside of the roof and the walls, and also that the board floor
extended under the bed, warning me not to step into the cellar, a sort of dust hole two feet deep. In her own words, they were "good boards overhead, good boards all around, and a good window" -- of two whole squares originally, only the cat had passed out that way lately. There was a stove, a bed, and a place to sit, an infant in the house where it was born, a silk parasol, gilt-framed looking-glass, and a patent new coffee-mill nailed to an oak sapling, all told. The bargain was soon concluded, for James had in the meanwhile returned. I to pay four dollars and twenty-five cents tonight, he to vacate at five tomorrow morning, selling to obody else meanwhile: I to take possession at six. It were well, he said, to be there early, and anticipate certain indistinct but wholly unjust claims on the score of ground rent and fuel. This he assured me was the only encumbrance. At six I passed him and his family on the road. One large bundle held their all -- bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens -- all but
the cat; she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.


Thoreau deconstructs the Collins shanty to reconstruct his house/temple at Walden, just as he deconstructs and reconstructs conventional religion. The allusion to "the removal of the gods of Troy" in the next paragraph is a hint of the greater significance of this paragraph. Note: the roof is peaked, the window deep and high, the interior dark, and it appears as if surrounded by a wall. Inside this structure is "a patent new coffee-mill," an icon of the new religion of commerce, nailed to an oak sapling. Oh, James Collins is probably Irish Catholic, and this transaction is probably occurring during Easter Week, 1845. What hidden visual image underlies Thoreau's description of the shanty?

It's a cathedral, the surrounding wall of dirt resembling a flying buttress. The phrase "here a board and there a board" cost me a day to resolve. It is an allusion to "Old McDonald Had a Farm."

To read Walden fully, the reader needs to dwell on the text with a contemplative frame of mind. Otherwise, a shanty is just a shanty, and a coffee-mill is just a coffee-mill. Wrestle with the angel and get the blessing.

Tom



Thu Jul 10, 2008 11:17 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Gold Contributor

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 285
Location: Florida
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 19 times in 12 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post hermeneutics
Thomas, you know how much respect I have for the clarity and thoroughness of your thoughts and the gentle way you present them. I perceive a trend in this discussion which prompts me to refresh everyone's memory about three important words that apply to understanding the author's intent from a text. The following is extracted from Wikipedia.

Exegesis involves an extensive and critical Interpretation of an authoritative writing. Exegesis also is used to describe the Elucidation of Philosophical and legal texts.

One may encounter the terms exegesis and hermeneutics used interchangeably; however, there remains a distinction. An exegesis is the interpretation and understanding of a text on the basis of the text itself. A Hermeneutic is a practical application of a certain method or theory of interpretation often revolving around the contemporary relevance of the text in question.

Essentially, hermeneutics involves cultivating the ability to understand things from somebody else's point of view, and to appreciate the cultural and social forces that may have influenced their outlook. Hermeneutics is the process of applying this understanding to interpreting the meaning of written texts and symbolic artifacts (such as art or sculpture or architecture), which may be either historic or contemporary.

The point of mentioning these two words is the human tendency to involuntarily introduce eisegesis into an interpretation of text.

Eisegesis from the Greek 'to lead in' is the process of interpretation of an existing text in such a way as to introduce one's own ideas. This is best understood when contrasted with Exegesis. While exegesis draws out the meaning from the text, eisegesis occurs when a reader reads his/her interpretation into the text. As a result, exegesis tends to be objective when employed effectively while eisegesis is regarded as highly subjective.



Thu Jul 10, 2008 1:44 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie


Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 825
Location: Wyse Fork, NC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Re: hermeneutics
lawrenceindestin wrote:
I perceive a trend in this discussion . . . .


Thank you, Lawrence, but from my trajectory you do not observe a dangerous trend, because I have reached cruising altitude and do not expect to be going any higher :) The chicks must flap their own wings, and the mother hen who rises too far from her brood risks losing them forever.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exegesis

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eisegesis

You have added to my vocabulary eisegesis. (Penelope won't like it.) Apparently eisegesis is a term of ecclesiastical opprobrium, in practice meaning no more than unorthodox or undogmatic. As I am not institutionalized and have no interest in being orthodox or dogmatic, I would consider it an honor to be called eisegete by those who are. Ecclesiastics who use the term, I imagine, do not mean to imply that they are open to an impartial and objective weighing of evidence.

Wikipedia says: "Exactly what constitutes eisegesis remains a source of debate among theologians, but most scholars agree about the importance of determining the authorial intentions." When author and text are as challenging as Thoreau and Walden, a reader without sympathy and respect is unlikely to discover any "authorial intentions."

Tom



Thu Jul 10, 2008 4:18 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Gold Contributor

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 285
Location: Florida
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 19 times in 12 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post I see we are not yet of one spirit
Thomas, it appears you read the new post to my blog. But no comment?

Ah to the issue. You quote Thoreau as follows:
Quote:
the window was so deep and high. It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap.


You then stated
Quote:
What hidden visual image underlies Thoreau's description of the shanty? (and then you answer) It's a cathedral, the surrounding wall of dirt resembling a flying buttress


I say that statment of yours is Eisegesis. I'm glad you find deep meaning in Walden. It is one of my favorite books. However, you know what an itch I have about raising a belief to be a fact for others to believe in and how hard I scratch that itch in my essay. What I'm asking for is honesty. Put a disclaimer before such statements. If you think it is a metaphor, allagory, similie, or foreshadowing then say, "I think even though Thorough describes the dirt as being like a compost heap, I see it as a stantion for his new cathederal which will be the new church replacing the religion of his time."

We are in dialogue, I pick no fight. I look forward to your reply.



Fri Jul 11, 2008 11:58 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie


Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 825
Location: Wyse Fork, NC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Re: I see we are not yet of one spirit
lawrenceindestin wrote:
Thomas, it appears you read the new post to my blog.


Lawrence, I see that you have a certain sensitivity to allusion. All we (Thoreau and I) need do is to cultivate this innate ability a little more, and you will be a Transcendentalist too. And, yes, it's a wonderful story (with one reservation), and I recommend that everyone read it.

lawrenceindestin wrote:
I say that statment of yours is Eisegesis.


OK, but if you check out the webpages of persons who use the term eisegesis, I think you might find that they are persons you don't want to be associated with. Anyway, if you mean misinterpretation, Why not say so?

lawrenceindestin wrote:
I'm glad you find deep meaning in Walden. It is one of my favorite books. However, you know what an itch I have about raising a belief to be a fact for others to believe in and how hard I scratch that itch in my essay. What I'm asking for is honesty.


Well, I think I'm pretty honest, but I did withhold evidence for my position, and I did so partly to make a simple, concise presentation that this medium requires, but also because I believe in holding a little ammo in reserve. Also, Thoreauvians never tell all. One of the most important facilities at Walden was Thoreau's outhouse, and it is unmentioned in Walden.

This to me looks like evidence:

Quote:
Note: the roof is peaked, the window deep and high, the interior dark, and it appears as if surrounded by a wall. Inside this structure is "a patent new coffee-mill," an icon of the new religion of commerce, nailed to an oak sapling. Oh, James Collins is probably Irish Catholic, and this transaction is probably occurring during Easter Week, 1845.



lawrenceindestin wrote:
Put a disclaimer before such statements. If you think it is a metaphor, allegory, simile, or foreshadowing then say, "I think even though Thoreau describes the dirt as being like a compost heap, I see it as a stanchion for his new cathedral which will be the new church replacing the religion of his time."


Of course every conclusion I reach is hypothetical, based on the evidence I have and the care with which I have reasoned, and the same goes for everyone else. Measure twice, cut once. In justice I'd like for every Walden literalist to qualify statements too: "I think that in spite of the fact that Thoreau was a master of allusion the phrase "the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap" is no more than a pile of dirt." Literalists, of course, aren't going to qualify what they say because they are in the majority. What happens in religion is that persons who do not agree with religious literalism leave. I'd rather people didn't leave Walden.

Tom



Fri Jul 11, 2008 4:58 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4942
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1081
Thanked: 1039 times in 812 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: I see we are not yet of one spirit
Quote:
Literalists, of course, aren't going to qualify what they say because they are in the majority. What happens in religion is that persons who do not agree with religious literalism leave. I'd rather people didn't leave Walden.


Tom, because you designate HDT as a master of allusion is not in itself a warrant for the symbolic reading you prefer. Is HDT speaking to us of things other than what is signified on the surface? Well, your need as a reader will determine this at times. My need will swing me in that direction less often. I think to excoriate "literalists" in the context of Walden is to unnecessarily introduce division to the experience of reading HDT. Most of all, could it be that "the love of things for what they are" (paraphrase Robt. Frost) is something you might place less value on than other readers, and even Thoreau, did? This was a man in love with the reality of the life and forms he saw. True, there were essences and identities beneath the surface that Thoreau insisted were real, too, but "thingness" was primary. I agree that Thoreau may never report a fact just with the intent of leaving it at that, but with the purpose of laying down a trail of symbols? You believe so, but if I do not in a given instance, am I misreading or impoverishing the text?

DWill



Fri Jul 11, 2008 7:22 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Gold Contributor

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 285
Location: Florida
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 19 times in 12 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post you do not disappoint me
Thomas you say
Quote:
OK, but if you check out the webpages of persons who use the term eisegesis, I think you might find that they are persons you don't want to be associated with. Anyway, if you mean misinterpretation, Why not say so?


No Thomas, you do not understand. Eisegesis is imputing your life, knowledge, understanding, beliefs, prejudicesis into the meaning of a word a man/woman wrote. There can be no "misinterpretation" because it is impossible to know what the writer intended to say. You can only believe whay you think is accurate. You have not understood my essay. Our issue is not about the word eisegesis but about understanding what an author meant. We can't know that. We can believe what we think he meant but we can't know it.

Quote:
You rightly say Of course every conclusion I reach is hypothetical, based on the evidence I have and the care with which I have reasoned, and the same goes for everyone else. Measure twice, cut once. In justice I'd like for every Walden literalist to qualify statements too: "I think that in spite of the fact that Thoreau was a master of allusion the phrase "the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap" is no more than a pile of dirt." Literalists, of course, aren't going to qualify what they say because they are in the majority.


Weak argument there my friend Thomas. As you may suspect, I give not one damn if anyone agrees with me conclusions. I've suffered the tyrany of the majority and I lived long enough to rebel from it. The issue for you to resolve, in my opinion, it that literalists and allagoristits, et al, are all operating on their belief. (Hopefully honestly.) And therefore entitled to their opinion, whether accepted by one, all or none.

I love our dialogue. I love your honesty. And I deeply appreciate and am grateful for your tolerating my obdurate behavior.[/quote]



Fri Jul 11, 2008 7:47 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie


Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 825
Location: Wyse Fork, NC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Re: I see we are not yet of one spirit
DWill wrote:
Tom, because you designate HDT as a master of allusion is not in itself a warrant for the symbolic reading you prefer.


Will, I have never claimed that anything was true simply because I said it. What I do claim about Thoreau's allusive language is that it is a fact because I can point out examples. Really, all a doubting person needs do is examine the notes in Harding's or Cramer's annotated edition, or go to Ann Woodlief's site

http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendenta ... au/walden/

and click on the text in red.

DWill wrote:
I agree that Thoreau may never report a fact just with the intent of leaving it at that, but with the purpose of laying down a trail of symbols? You believe so, but if I do not in a given instance, am I misreading or impoverishing the text?


Yes, if a person does not understand all that Thoreau intends, he is both misreading and impoverishing the text. If when a person encounters

Thoreau wrote:
9.2 Occasionally, after my hoeing was done for the day, I joined some impatient companion who had been fishing on the pond since morning, as silent and motionless as a duck or a floating leaf, and, after practising various kinds of philosophy, had concluded commonly, by the time I arrived, that he belonged to the ancient sect of Coenobites.


his mind wanders off into speculation about the Christian fathers as mine did, he has misread the text. In the Collins shanty paragraph, if a reader does not grasp the allusion in the oak sapling rooted inside the shanty (Odysseus's bed), he has misread.

And note, you said "symbol," not me. Like "eisegenesis," "symbol" and "symbolic" are ill-defined, pejorative terms for many persons, and I try not to use them. Allusion is judgment neutral.

Tom



Fri Jul 11, 2008 9:26 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie


Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 825
Location: Wyse Fork, NC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Re: you do not disappoint me
lawrenceindestin wrote:
No Thomas, you do not understand. Eisegesis is imputing your life, knowledge, understanding, beliefs, prejudicesis into the meaning of a word a man/woman wrote. There can be no "misinterpretation" because it is impossible to know what the writer intended to say.


Hold on, Lawrence! Are you saying that communication between humans is impossible? Do you mean that the true self is hopelessly buried within the body and can't get out? In my opinion most people wear their hearts on their sleeves, and if you pay attention to them, you know what's in their hearts.

lawrenceindestin wrote:
As you may suspect, I give not one damn if anyone agrees with my conclusions.


Life isn't that bad, Lawrence. I would like for people to agree with me when I'm doing right and to correct me when I'm doing wrong, although sometime they correct me when I'm doing right and agree with me when I'm doing wrong, so I also use my own judgment. Frankly, a little more agreement would be nice :)

Tom



Fri Jul 11, 2008 9:56 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Gold Contributor

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 285
Location: Florida
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 19 times in 12 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post one more time
Quote:
Hold on, Lawrence! Are you saying that communication between humans is impossible?

No Thomas. I believe that oral or written conversation at its best is a defective means of communication. If the writer puts a double entendre behind every word he's writing a puzzle or is being sarcastic. Such a writer is not attempting to convey information.
Quote:
Do you mean that the true self is hopelessly buried within the body and can't get out?

Yes Thomas. We are born alone. We live alone. And we die alone in community.
Quote:
In my opinion most people wear their hearts on their sleeves, and if you pay attention to them, you know what's in their hearts.

Yes Thomas, it was said long ago "out of the mouth come the meditation of your heart.
Quote:
Life isn't that bad, Lawrence.

Alas, Thomas, I have found it worse for me. Would that right conduct and wrong conduct could have been so easily determined. The cry of my heart is we have no standard only laws of men based on superstition, pride and greed.
Quote:
so I also use my own judgment.

For the reasons last stated men have been doing what they think is right in their own mind for thousands of years.
Quote:
Frankly, a little more agreement would be nice

I hear you Thomas and it is past time for us to get back to Thoreau. I will go to the site you recommend. I also have to warn you I found my Cliff Notes from college (which were written just after Thoreau worte Walden) so I'll have some real ammo to agree with you.



Sat Jul 12, 2008 7:46 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie


Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 825
Location: Wyse Fork, NC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Re: one more time
lawrenceindestin wrote:
I also have to warn you I found my Cliff Notes from college (which were written just after Thoreau worte Walden) so I'll have some real ammo to agree with you.


Lawrence, I believe your copy of the Walden Cliffsnotes is available at

http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/Lit ... d-159.html

This guide by Joseph R. McElrath is copyrighted 1971 -- the era of war protest, riot, student takeover of campuses, communes. You remember: live in the woods and be natural like HDT, supposedly. Walden was the hippy equivalent of the Little Red Book. Considering how trying the times must have been for him, I think McElrath's work is good, but be warned: his dominant attitude is resentment and his expression sarcastic.

I suspect that at the time McElrath was a poor, liberal arts Ph.D and grit his teeth and did the work because he needed the money. He did no work on Thoreau afterward that I have been able to find.

http://www.english.fsu.edu/faculty/jmcelrath.htm

This little book is the most significant thing McElrath wrote, and it is conspicuously missing from his list of Representative Publications.

Tom



Sat Jul 12, 2008 11:52 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Gold Contributor

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 285
Location: Florida
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 19 times in 12 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Cliff Notes
Tom, my Cliff Notes were printed before McIlrath wore diapers. Since this thread seems to be me and you, have your read 'Harlan Hubbard" by Wendal Berry. For more than 40 years he and his wife Anna lived on a house boat, then a cabin on the river in Kentucky. It is a sweet read and I obviously think you would enjoy it. Harlan respected Thoreau. A quote from the book at page 91
Quote:
(Barry talking) In 1976, I wrote a forward for a new addition of "Shantyboat" (Harlan was the author). I sent Harlan a copy of the manuscript and then in a few days I went to Payne Hollow to see if any changes needed to be made. I found that there was indeed a change I would have to make. Something that I had said about Thoreau (I no longer remember what) seemed to Harlan to be disrespectful, and I would have to take it out. I agreed to take it out, without any protest at all; it was perfectly all right with me. But though I made no attempt to test Harlan's determination, I remember feeling, through his characteristic quietness and politeness, that his determination was absolute:he would see my forward and his new addition sunk in the river before his workwould be made the occasion of any disrespect to Thoreau. By then I had read both of Harlan's published books and was pretty well acquainted with his way of living. I knew that there was bound to be in him a resoluteness of the staunchest sort, and I was not surprised to meet it.



Sat Jul 12, 2008 2:08 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie


Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 825
Location: Wyse Fork, NC
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Cliff Notes
lawrenceindestin wrote:
Tom, my Cliff Notes were printed before McElrath wore diapers.


If you will, Lawrence, look at the title page of your copy and give me the name of the author. Cliffsnotes is important because it influences the understanding and attitude of hundreds of thousands. If it's written under contract, the copyright owner may not be the author.

Beginning in the last 24 hours, I have ceased to receive email notices of new posting to Booktalk. I would not have realized that there were new postings if I hadn't seen the new posting scroll when going to your blog.

I didn't know about Harlan Hubbard at all and have some catching up to do:

http://www.harlanhubbard.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlan_Hubbard

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wendell_Berry

Tom



Sat Jul 12, 2008 4:02 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Gold Contributor

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 285
Location: Florida
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 19 times in 12 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post my cliff's notes
The author of my Cliff's notes is Robert J. Milch, B.A. Brooklyn College. I must have bought it when I was in law school. The copyright date is 1964 by c.k. hillegross.

I'm glad I introduced you to Harlan Hubbard. You will have a pleasant trip with them.

FYI, pm Chris and tell him. He's having trouble with the server.



Sat Jul 12, 2008 4:28 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Gold Contributor

Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 285
Location: Florida
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 19 times in 12 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Happy Birthday
Thomas Hood, I'm a bit chagrined you haven't sent me a Happy Birthday wish on the 191st anniversary of our friend Henry David Thoreau. I waited as long as I could before I one uped you. Love, Lawrence



Sat Jul 12, 2008 6:10 pm
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:


A Nation Under Judgment by Richard Capriola


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books






BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
Frankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

cron
Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2011. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank