Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Mon Oct 20, 2014 9:07 pm




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
VIII- HD- Mr Kurtz. 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post VIII- HD- Mr Kurtz.
VIII- Mr Kurtz.


1- In the second part of the novella, page 69, we learn about a report Mr Kurtz wrote for "The International Society for the Suppression of Savage Customs".


a- What do you think of the choice of name for the Society?


b- What may this be alluding to?


c- What about the four words Kurtz scrawled at the bottom of his report?



2- About Mr Kurtz, the narrator writes that "The thing was to know what he belonged to, how many powers of darkness claimed him for their own"
page 67.







3- DWill wrote:

Quote:
Achebe may also be right about Kurtz being a hollow figure and in no way worthy of the awe that Marlow shows for him. Big deal, Kurtz goes nuts and loses all his fine principles. He ends up a mass murderer who may discover what a bad character he was upon his own death. Marlow tells us over and over about Kurtz's effect on him, but he does little showing of Kurtz's supposed magnificence. It's hard to see any tragic quality in Kurtz that would so affect Marlow. In that regard, the book may not be even the complete artistic success it is reputed to be.


_________________
Ophelia.


Sun Feb 03, 2008 1:50 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post 
Heh! Heh! I dunno', really - but I remember how funny I found it when I'm across the name of that society - it just seemed like something somebody would conjur up as a joke.



Thu Feb 14, 2008 7:25 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 2969
Location: Cheshire, England
Thanks: 235
Thanked: 474 times in 365 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United Kingdom (uk)

Post 
Well - wait a minute -

I know that in the past we used to have public hangings and burnings and furthermore, people went to watch!!!

But there were more recently barbaric practices by tribes in Africa, and still are - if twins were born - one had to be killed - that was part of a tradition which I believe the Victorian missionaries countered.

There is still female circumcision - and worse - performed on young girls from certain African tribes - and so I think I would join a society to bannish this practise if I knew of one - now.

I don't think it is wrong to interfere - so long as we remember that we have been just as barbaric in the past.



Sat Feb 16, 2008 5:34 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
Penelope,


This is something I have often thought about over the years.

Once people in the west had realized how much harm our colonizing or general meddling had done in the past (missionaries doing more wrong than good, etc...), there was a strong voice saying that we should do the opposite, and leave well alone in traditional societies in Africa.

Unfortunately, this always means leaving women to their sometimes horrid fate.

We can't interfere, and it's no use preaching. Interfering as western nations would be wrong and impractical: we would never have enough United Nation soldiers to watch all cruel practises.

One thing that does work I think is NGOs offering pratctical ways of making women's lives easier (for example by bringing water into villages) and offering education for women.

Once women are no longer crushed by domestic tasks they have some time to learn and once they are educated they are better equipped to first question and then refuse tyranical customs which wictimize women and children.


_________________
Ophelia.


Sat Feb 16, 2008 6:13 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
The name of the society projects the European view that the native people needed to be saved, civilized. Whatever customs may have existed that were truly savage (and I don't think we can say to what extent these may have been present), it seems that the practices introduced by the Europeans wanting to get rich were savage indeed. Thus I believe that Conrad could mean the name to be bitterly ironic.

Kurtz couldn't maintain his noble intentions once he arrived in the heart of darkness. Presumably, he lost his mind entirely and repudiated all his high aims, becoming a monster. Now, whether it was that he descended to the savagery of the Africans whom he was among, or that his monstrousness came from his own being, I can't say for sure. To me, the answer Conrad gives is ambiguous.

DWill



Sun Feb 17, 2008 7:52 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 2969
Location: Cheshire, England
Thanks: 235
Thanked: 474 times in 365 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United Kingdom (uk)

Post 
Well, DWill, I think that Kurtz comes over as a complete megalomaniac. He went there and was intent on collecting all of that Ivory. I think the Ivory became an obsession - and he forgot it was meant to buy him a comfortable life.

He obviously enjoyed lording it over the natives......not only they, but the white men seem to have been in awe of him......big ego....believed his own publicity.......there are still folk like that about.

I was once a mere typist at ICI Engineering here in Cheshire. There was a big Soda Ash making plant opposite our building. I went to a 'Quality Training' seminar once which was meant to train one to prioritise ones tasks. I asked 'What is Soda Ash - What is it for?' No one knew. The Managers had to find out and then write a letter to me explaining what it was used for. Even then, it was all rather vague. :shock:



Mon Feb 18, 2008 6:35 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 2969
Location: Cheshire, England
Thanks: 235
Thanked: 474 times in 365 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United Kingdom (uk)

Post 
DWill said:

Kurtz couldn't maintain his noble intentions once he arrived in the heart of darkness.

IMO - There is nothing 'noble' about the gathering and exporting of Ivory.

However, there is plenty of evidence of 'Savage Practices' among ethnic groups today. I am not saying that we, as a culture, don't have brutal or barbaric practices. But we don't have women expected to throw themselves on their husband's funeral pire as in India. We don't mutilate our young women as still happens today. To give just two examples.

I think the idea of the 'noble savage' can be carried too far. I am all for interfering, even though I do appreciate that some of these tribes have practises which we would do well to emulate. But some should be addressed.....



Mon Feb 18, 2008 6:48 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Online
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4173
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1140
Thanked: 1197 times in 900 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post 
Penelope wrote:
... there is plenty of evidence of 'Savage Practices' among ethnic groups today. I am not saying that we, as a culture, don't have brutal or barbaric practices. But we don't have women expected to throw themselves on their husband's funeral pire as in India. We don't mutilate our young women as still happens today. To give just two examples. I think the idea of the 'noble savage' can be carried too far. I am all for interfering, even though I do appreciate that some of these tribes have practises which we would do well to emulate. But some should be addressed.....


It is interesting here to think about the real difference between Europe and Africa in the contest for power. Hilaire Belloc maintained the difference was force of arms



Mon Feb 18, 2008 7:16 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
Penelope wrote:

Quote:
IMO - There is nothing 'noble' about the gathering and exporting of Ivory.


We all noticed that the Africans who helped Kurtz get all the ivory he wanted were just vague figures in the background, but talking about the white male in the centre relegating everything else to the world of darkness, what about the elephants themselves? I don't remember even reading ther word "elephant" in the novella, it's as if the tusks just happened to be there for the collecting.

I haven't read any critic writing about lack of regard for conservation - not mentioning animal rights- OK, I could not resist the temptation of a little anachronistic thinking here.

Penelope, I think "megalomaniac" is a good word for Kurtz.


_________________
Ophelia.


Mon Feb 18, 2008 7:39 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 2969
Location: Cheshire, England
Thanks: 235
Thanked: 474 times in 365 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United Kingdom (uk)

Post 
RoberTulip said:

So, I favour interference to improve governance and services. Barbaric practices such as slavery and terrorism can be reduced by economic development. But the example of the colonial empires of nineteenth century Africa shows the negative consequences of flimsy assumptions about superiority when these assumptions so easily degenerate into racial prejudice.

How well said Robert - you are obviously so much better informed than I and I am grateful to have read your well-worded reply.

We do seem to go in and take everything and give nothing back - often.
Sometimes we do the wrong thing for the right reason and sometimes the right thing for the wrong reason. Sometimes we (in the West) have just done the wrong thing for the basest of reasons. But although we might feel ashamed at how we have behaved in the past, I don't think it means we should turn our faces away completely from overt barbarism. In fact, I think this is the opposite of racism - not to exploit, but to treat as we ourselves would wish to be treated in such circumstances.

Thus one is labelled - Idealist!!!!! Or in my case 'Interfering old Busybody'. :)



Mon Feb 18, 2008 7:48 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 2969
Location: Cheshire, England
Thanks: 235
Thanked: 474 times in 365 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United Kingdom (uk)

Post 
DWill, Robert Tulip, Ophelia and anyone else who might be interested:

Vis a Vis - doing the wrong thing for the right reasons.

Some years ago I was a fairly active member of Amnesty International.

I used to write letters to Governments and Influencial people about certain political prisoners....then...one evening I went to a meeting where the guest speaker was from Argentina....(just as it happens..Argentina),

He said, not in so many words, but he said, 'Will you stop writing letters and drawing attention to these individuals....because when you do they just get 'disappeared'. (BTW - after they had disappeared - the only way they could be identified in their graves was by their trainers (shoes) - not biodegradable you see. So where do we go on ecology from there?)

However, after this happened, I went into reverse, so to speak. I sat with my head in my hands feeling mortified that I might have contributed to the deaths of the people I was aiming to help. I thought, I am not going to try any more.....I am too ignorant.

Well, I am ignorant.....but I know what is cruel and wrong....I know we may never create a better world.....it is easier for a few evil bods to destroy the endeavours of hundreds of well-meaning folk.

But I still think that the worst thing we can do is to turn our faces to the wall and feel powerless. I feel compelled to speak out when I see, meaningless, blind cruelty.....and if I never achieve anything...so what.

It is wrong.....just wrong, not to speak out. We might.....just might, make a difference.



Mon Feb 18, 2008 10:06 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
Penelope,

When I mentioned "noble intentions," I didn't mean his intention to get rich on ivory (which I don't doubt was his & everyone's true motive), but the "cover story" of bringing enlightenment to a benighted section of the world. I enjoy Marlowe's very biting commentary on this deadly hypocrisy; he saw what was going on with clear eyes. So we can talk about what might be deficient (in the view of some) in Marlowe's portrayal of race and culture, but more than balancing this is his ringing denouncement of both the business and "humanitarian" enterprises of the Europeans.

That was a horrid scene early in the story when Marlowe visits the mining operation. By all evidence, the culture was being wiped out along with a good number of human beings. Where was there any attempt to reform savage customs? So I'm suggesting that in the context of the story, and from Marlowe's point of view, the Society for the Suppression of etc. is a mockery.



Tue Feb 19, 2008 10:35 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
I can has reading?

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 2969
Location: Cheshire, England
Thanks: 235
Thanked: 474 times in 365 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United Kingdom (uk)

Post 
Thanks DWill -

You see, that is the trouble - I read the book and could perceive that Conrad was appalled at the treatment of the natives, and angry at feeling helpless to challenge it....we all know that feeling to some extent in the 21st century.

Also, I understood when it turned out that Kurtz had shrunken heads on the posts around his house.....that Kurtz had 'descended' to the 'savage' level. But in the back of my mind, I know that Conrad is more subtle than this......I am wondering what I am missing and why. Now that is a good thing, I know, except that I am not sure where to look for the answers.

I perish the thought of using those 'students' books which 'tell' you which questions to ask and what the 'correct' answer is in order to pass an examination. I want to ask my own questions - and find my own answers - well I know there is rarely a correct answer - perhaps I should say, find my own replies.

I need your input you guys.......



Wed Feb 20, 2008 4:47 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Online
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4173
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1140
Thanked: 1197 times in 900 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post 
Penelope wrote:
Thanks DWill - You see, that is the trouble - I read the book and could perceive that Conrad was appalled at the treatment of the natives, and angry at feeling helpless to challenge it....we all know that feeling to some extent in the 21st century. Also, I understood when it turned out that Kurtz had shrunken heads on the posts around his house.....that Kurtz had 'descended' to the 'savage' level. But in the back of my mind, I know that Conrad is more subtle than this......I am wondering what I am missing and why. Now that is a good thing, I know, except that I am not sure where to look for the answers. I perish the thought of using those 'students' books which 'tell' you which questions to ask and what the 'correct' answer is in order to pass an examination. I want to ask my own questions - and find my own answers - well I know there is rarely a correct answer - perhaps I should say, find my own replies. I need your input you guys.......

Hi Penelope. The way I read it, Kurtz's 'descent' is more a metaphor for the enterprise stripped bare than a suggestion of acceptance of African values. Europe is able to use euphemisms, lies and censorship to maintain the veneer of nobility, but at the frontier, where things can only exist authentically rather than with pretence, the heads on posts are a simple shock saying 'this is what it is all really about'. This pikestaff head caper was quite common in Europe up to the French Revolution. When the Portuguese took Goa, I have read that they used enemy heads as cannon balls, a practice so shocking that the locals gave up in fright at the barbarity of the redskins from Europe. Some nice stories about Vasco de Gama are at http://www.periclespress.com/Dutch_Portugal.html

By the way, I had a letter published today about honi soit - http://blogs.theaustralian.news.com.au/ ... bruary_21/



Thu Feb 21, 2008 6:39 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Junior

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 311
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 3 times in 3 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
Kurtz sits at the heart of the darkness in Heart of Darkness. I think Robert is correct that his descent epitomizes the true nature of the colonial enterprise laid bare, stipped of all the euphemisms and pretensions of noble purpose.

But is what happens to Kurtz a descent or an actualization? Do we really think Kurtz lost himself in Africa? Isn't it really the case that there, removed from all restraints, he was free to act in accordance with his own basic nature?

I think that's the real darkness in the story. I also think that's the horror he was forced to confront at the end, the horror of his own self-deception. With his own hands Kurtz had shredded the mask with which he had concealed his own true nature from himself.

So maybe his last "the horror...the horror" was not so much a reaction to what he had seen, or done, or become but was the recognition of what he always had been.

And since Kurtz's character, returning to Robert's point, is emblematic of the colonial enterprise as a whole, his revelation strips away all pretense.

It's not that the colonial effort began with noble intentions and gradually lost its way through the greed and corruption of its agents, but that the enterprise was rotten at its very core from the outset.

The starkness of that message may also explain why Conrad chose to wrap Marlow's narrative in a narrative. It has the effect of softening the story, making it less direct. Perhaps Conrad felt that, like Kurtz's intended, the audience for whom he was writing could not face the plain truth.

One commentator I read wrote that Conrad fretted he had made Kurtz "too symbolic." I think there was reason to fret, but I don't see how he could have done things differently unless he had chosen to write a much longer work. As it is, he wrote an extended short story that has the thematic richness of a novel.

George


_________________
George Ricker

"Nothing about atheism prevents me from thinking about any idea. It is the very epitome of freethought. Atheism imposes no dogma and seeks no power over others."

[i][b]mere atheism: no gods


Thu Feb 21, 2008 11:03 am
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books

Books by New Authors



Booktalk.org on Facebook 



BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
Sense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

cron
Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2014. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank