Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Tue May 24, 2016 2:57 am

<< Week of May 24, 2016 >>
Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday
24 Day Month

25 Day Month

26 Day Month

27 Day Month

28 Day Month

29 Day Month

30 Day Month





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
Splendid Suns: Ending. 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post Splendid Suns: Ending.
A thousand Splended Suns:

Any comments on the ending of the novel ?


_________________
Ophelia.


Last edited by Ophelia on Wed Feb 06, 2008 5:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Thu Dec 20, 2007 3:51 am
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post A fairly happy ending . . .
I'm pleased she and Tariq found each other again and got together.

And it goes against my better principles to say this, but when they killed off that old fart?

I ENJOYED IT IMMENSELY!

Unfortunately, not all Afghanistans have happy endings to their lives though.



Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:28 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
I see what you mean Carla about the reader not shedding tears on Rasheed's demise.

This is of course one of those conflict solutions that happen mostly in books; without the author's providential intervention reality would have been bleak for the women, just lifelong misery.

I found it interesting to note that the author is always concerned about his characters and their humanity-- as they took the decision to kill they thought about peotecting the son whose father had locked in a room.


_________________
Ophelia.


Sat Feb 02, 2008 5:57 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post The son locked in the room . . .
Although Rasheed is a creep of the highest order as far as his treatment and attitude toward women is concerned, I don't think he meant harm in locking the boy in the room.

He, in his warped way of thinking, thought he was protecting the child from what he viewed as 'evil women'.

I think Rasheed was cruel to the extreme; he was just plain sick in the head with the fundamentalistic side of Islam.

The author does a good job at making us realize that not all Muslim men are cruel to women.

(Sorry I didn't get a chance to come back for a couple of days.)



Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:24 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post women in Muslim countries
Yes, Carly, Rasheed loved his son (not his daughter though) and only locked him up because he didn't want him to witness the argument/ beating up scene that was about to follow.


Yesterday I saw a very disturbing documentary on TV: it was about the equivalent of a psychiatric hospital in Pakistan.

First, the inmates/ patients were only women and their children (males having either no psychiatric problems or being treated in different types of places).
The women were in cells, behind bars. One had been brought there many months before for ...whatever her husband had decided this place was for. He had said he would be back soon; he never returned, but sent her divorce papers after a month.


_________________
Ophelia.


Wed Feb 06, 2008 5:17 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Awwwwwwwww!
That's awful, isn't it . . . but at least it's better than your inlaws killing you off.

I've heard about that - the groom's parents take so much money from the bride's parents when they get married.

Then they want to get rid of the bride - so the mother in law gives her son's wife something to do at the stove, and it blows up!

Geesh!



Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:29 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
I read about this many times about India, so this time it's not Muslim culture.
It happens so often that all the main newspapers have a page listing "dowry deaths".

Why be satisfied with the dowry your first wife brings if her death can bring about dowry number two?

In most cases it's engineered by mothers-in-law, but that's not all: in those rare cases when the police actually investigate and the in-laws are found guilty, only the mother-in law goes to jail most of the time. The husband, if bothered at all, just pays a fine, although there are specific laws condemning those customs in India.

I saw a TV programme where they showed some of the mothers-in-law in jail, explaining indignantly that they had no idea why they were there and how they'd always been good mothers, etc...

As is so often the case, customs, ignorance, poverty, and human nature are a lethal mix.


_________________
Ophelia.


Thu Feb 07, 2008 5:48 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Probably set up by the men . . .
Although I wonder if that's the case - do the men make the women commit the crime, or take the blame for it?

I dunno' . . .

I wonder how the bride's husband actually feels about it.

I wonder why I particularly mistrust the 'men' in these cultures? Surely all the women aren't lilly-white innocents.



Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:34 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
WildCityWoman wrote:

Quote:
Although I wonder if that's the case - do the men make the women commit the crime, or take the blame for it?


From what I read it's not clear who thinks about it first, but the mothers-in-law seem to take part most willingly. Out of greed, and I imagine this time in their lives is the only time when they exercise power over another human being.

If you google " dowry deaths times of India" you'll get lots of results.
Here is one:

http://www1.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/2670297.cms


_________________
Ophelia.


Sun Feb 10, 2008 1:19 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post 
Ah, thanks Ophelia . . . I won't do it right now though.

I've been stuck at home with an ankle/foot that I sprained last weekend - today I've got two appointments;

1) dietician;
2) x-rays . . . chest, bone density, etal.

Then I hope to be taken to lunch at Ali Baba's - where I might get to have Shrawrma chicken again!

So I don't wanna' depress myself this early in the morn.

Ha ha!



Mon Mar 24, 2008 6:32 am
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post 
It is a warped field in India of opposing viewpoints. In the cities you have engineers, scientists, modern thinkers who want so much for India to fully enter the modern age, but if you drive a few miles into the villages, you find ancient traditions and customs living on, undisturbed. As India, the second fastest growing country in the world, begins to take up it's role as an influential country, we will have to see how they deal with this sort of thing. Already they have passed laws hoping to curb casteism, which is the largest concern, in my opinion. Having visited there myself, I feel that the treatment and respect of women is actually culturally and historically positive, even in the rural areas of Kerala that I saw. Far closer to the modern West compared to the Taliban regime.



Sat Apr 19, 2008 8:29 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Oddly Attracted to Books

Gold Contributor

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1543
Location: France
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 33 times in 33 posts
Gender: Female
Country: France (fr)

Post 
Hello Theowne, welcome to Booktalk. :smile:


Would you like to tell us a little about yourself, and about your tastes in books, by using the "Introduce Yourself threads" ?


_________________
Ophelia.


Sat Apr 19, 2008 10:45 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Getting Comfortable


Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Splendid Suns: Ending.
I really enjoyed this and the Kite Runner. I know they're different, but as I read them together, I tend to think of them as whole. Here's a brief article I wrote on them:

http://www.bukisa.com/articles/334163_t ... many-years



Tue Aug 31, 2010 6:55 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Book General

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 2521
Location: New Jersey
Thanks: 557
Thanked: 448 times in 357 posts
Gender: Female

Post Re: Splendid Suns: Ending.
This is an excellent review, it is very well written. Do you review books often? Do you review for any other sites?



Tue Aug 31, 2010 9:03 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:




Featured Books

Books by New Authors


*

FACTS is a select group of active BookTalk.org members passionate about promoting Freethought, Atheism, Critical Thinking and Science.

Apply to join FACTS
See who else is in FACTS







BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.



Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2016. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank