Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Nov 01, 2014 4:37 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 46 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Preface, Prologue, and Part One 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
I haven't forgotten about the book--really. I ran into something called an ethics book for counselors and psychotherapists and have had to devote some time at the kitchen table trying to focus attention on it. It's for work, 'nuff said.

It's a good thumbnail of human species development D. gives in "To the Starting Line." He wants to get us to the launch pad for his theory, so he sets up the human world as it was around 11,000 BC and asks if there are any clues as yet to why the continents developed as they did. He concludes that there wouldn't have been enough clues at that time; if we were to guess based on available information, we would get the 'wrong' conclusions. We might think that Australia/New Guinea would be the first pioneers.

I was impressed again by the ability of the fairly recent homo sapiens to change the environment. D. believes, along with many others, that extinctions of megafauna in the Americas and Australia/New Guinea were the result of humans killing all of these unwary animals. In the case of Australia, every one of the large mammals was driven to extinction, meaning that none would later be available for domestication, which had dramatic consequences for world history. It's ironic that the bounty that the 'American' hunters found meant that they would use up the resource and handicap their later development by leaving them more vulnerable to marauders from across the sea.

There is also evidence of other ecological change brought on by hunter/gatherers, mostly from the strategic use of fire. Parenthetically, the book by Charles Mann titled 1491, comes to mind. A jacket blurb calls it "Provocative...A Jared Diamond-like volley that challenges prevailing thinking about global development." Another blurb goes, "Our concept of pure wilderness untouched by grubby human hands must be jettisoned." I've had the book for some time...maybe I'll now get around to reading it.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Last edited by DWill on Sat Nov 26, 2011 10:06 am, edited 1 time in total.



Sat Nov 26, 2011 10:03 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
I haven't forgotten either - between the beautiful weather here in Virginia and family visiting for the holiday I've been occupied. I promise to be back on track by this evening.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sat Nov 26, 2011 10:52 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
My daughter brought up an interesting piece of information that fits right in with Chap. 1. She told me that one way that biologist search for the geographic origin of an organism is by looking for the location that has the greatest genetic diversity. For humans, apparently, the greatest genetic diversity occurs in Africa. This fact adds support to modern humans originating in Africa. I also wanted to point out Diamond's mention at the bottom of p.40 and onto the top of p.41 Cro-Magnons and Neanderthals as a mini example of his theory. He says there is no evidence of hybridization and indicated that Cro-Magnons out did the Neanderthal. In the past year I've read there is evidence that there are indicators there is genetic evidence of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans. If this is the case, it may not break Diamonds case; I only bring it up so we can keep track of what holds water and what does not. And the question will be do we have we a flood or a drip.

New York Times 7/5/2010
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/07/scien ... rthal.html

Neanderthals mated with some modern humans after all and left their imprint in the human genome, a team of biologists has reported in the first detailed analysis of the Neanderthal genetic sequence. The biologists, led by Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have been slowly reconstructing the genome of Neanderthals, the stocky hunters that dominated Europe until 30,000 years ago, by extracting the fragments of DNA that still exist in their fossil bones. Just last year, when the biologists first announced that they had decoded the Neanderthal genome, they reported no significant evidence of interbreeding.
Scientists say they have recovered 60 percent of the genome so far and hope to complete it. By comparing that genome with those of various present day humans, the team concluded that about 1 percent to 4 percent of the genome of non-Africans today is derived from Neanderthals. But the Neanderthal DNA does not seem to have played a great role in human evolution, they said.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sat Nov 26, 2011 6:26 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4186
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1146
Thanked: 1206 times in 905 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
Guns, Germs and Steel was published in 1997, fourteen years ago. There have been big advances in human genetic mapping since then.

A book I found immensely illuminating on the human story was Out Of Eden - The Peopling of the World by Professor Stephen Oppenheimer.
A summary is at http://www.bradshawfoundation.com/steph ... eading.php

A few comments by Diamond suggested that some more recent findings were more uncertain when he wrote. Especially the controversy over whether the world was peopled by a single exodus from Africa or by multiple waves of migration.

The website The Bradshaw Foundation contains very simple pictorial explanations at a page called The Journey of Mankind of what the DNA evidence says about the dating of the human departure from Africa and the slow migrations to fill the earth. One intriguing factor here is the 21,000 year precessional cycle of glaciation, with interglacials allowing migration into cold areas, and glacial periods, when the sea was more than 100 meters lower, opening up land bridges such as the Bering Strait, the mouth of the Red Sea, Bass Strait and the English Channel.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
heledd, Saffron
Sun Nov 27, 2011 1:07 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pulitzer Prize Finalist


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 488
Thanks: 44
Thanked: 113 times in 95 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
Really good website. Thanks. Was amazed to discover that Australia was populated before Northern Europe? Or did I just see it wrong. Think I might dip my toe (carefully) into a non fiction discussion.


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


Sun Nov 27, 2011 6:12 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
heledd wrote:
Really good website. Thanks. Was amazed to discover that Australia was populated before Northern Europe? Or did I just see it wrong. Think I might dip my toe (carefully) into a non fiction discussion.

You can jump right in & get wet--no worries here :)

About the updated information Robert steered us to, it will be interesting to see if this and other research done in the past 14 years since publication of GG & S will put a crimp in Diamond's theory of the outline of history. It doesn't seem to thus far, but maybe I'm not fully aware. I know that Diamond favors the late-migration theory of humans to the Americas, whereas others think the evidence is strong for considerably earlier arrival. But either way, the environment was decisive in determining that it would not be the native Americans who would look across the seas to expand their domains.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Last edited by DWill on Sun Nov 27, 2011 8:55 am, edited 1 time in total.



Sun Nov 27, 2011 8:45 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
DWill wrote:
About the updated information Robert steered us to, it will be interesting to see if this and other research done in the past 14 years since publication of GG & S will put a crimp in Diamond's theory of the outline of history. It doesn't seem to thus far, but maybe I'm not fully aware. I know that Diamond favors the late-migration theory of humans to the Americas, whereas others think the evidence is strong for considerably earlier arrival. But either way, the environment was decisive in determining that it would not be the native Americans who would look across the seas to expand their domains.


Here is my impression from watching the National Geo Special and skimming the book: I think his basic premise is correct. However, he tries to pull in too many other details that are unnecessary to his argument and in the end may detract from the whole work because like the example of the Neanderthal he may have prove to be incorrect or poor examples because of new scientific information.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sun Nov 27, 2011 9:14 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
I don't know who has read to the end of the section, but I'll pose what seems to me the obvious question. If we take as reliable the model that Diamond presents in the Maoris and the Morioris, do we have to conclude that subsistence is entirely dependent on geography (broadly considered, to include the six variables* he lists in Chap. 2)? If we do, does it also follow that culture itself results from the kind of subsistence that geography dictates? How the two peoples, originally from the same culture, fed themselves led to crucial differences in their cultures. This could all be said to be true only under the experimental conditions that Diamond says the Polynesian Islands offer. Once we have contacts from other cultures, we lose control of the variables. We have importation of non-native plants and animals and the influence of other religious beliefs and customs.

I wonder at what point the culture becomes something that by itself influences whether a people will adjust their means of subsistence. I'm thinking again of the example in Collapse, in which the European colonizers of Greenland didn't take advantage of food from the sea or of other native means of hunting. Their culture, not geography, dictated to them the terms of their survival as a colony. We also know that the problem of world hunger relief can be more complicated than getting calories to hungry people. Even though hunger is present, what a culture recognizes as food often needs to be considered first.

*The six variables are island climate, geological type, marine resources, area, terrain fragmentation, and isolation.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
Saffron
Sun Nov 27, 2011 12:18 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
Thanks, DW for your last post. Now that is something to chew on while I clean my garage.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sun Nov 27, 2011 12:32 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pulitzer Prize Finalist


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 488
Thanks: 44
Thanked: 113 times in 95 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
It’s unfortunate that Diamond, using totally subjective evidence, states that New Guineans are ‘more intelligent’ than the average American or European.
He reasons that this may be because New Guinean children (and by implication children of other developing countries) don’t spend their time in passive entertainment but spend their waking hours ‘doing something, such as talking or playing with other children’. This may be the case for New Guinean children, but it is well documented that for many children in the developing world, work starts at a very early age. This work can often be very tedious, and actually prevents children from playing.
As to his assertion that American and European children are made duller by their passive lifestyles, I would point out that most of these children are literate, and through easy access to tv and newspapers, have a wide knowledge of the world and different cultures – two of the factors that Diamond found important in the success of small Spanish forces subjugating huge kingdoms in South America.


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


The following user would like to thank heledd for this post:
DWill, Robert Tulip
Mon Nov 28, 2011 2:10 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4186
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1146
Thanked: 1206 times in 905 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
heledd wrote:
It’s unfortunate that Diamond, using totally subjective evidence, states that New Guineans are ‘more intelligent’ than the average American or European.


Yes, it is ridiculous. Diamond expects us to believe that people who grow up without electricity, and whose grandparents had no knowledge of metal, paper or the sea, have more stimulus and are smarter than people who grow up in rich countries.

I see this seemingly absurd statement as more a preemptive comment to deflect accusations that his geographic determinism is racist.

The fact is that human evolution is so recent that there are no genetic grounds to suggest racial disparity in intelligence. Human brains and physical ability reached their current level tens of thousands of years ago. All disparity seems to be cultural and individual.

Contrary to Diamond's comment, the evidence suggests that cultural opportunities for people to achieve their genetic potential are greater in rich countries. For example, the university system in the USA is better than the education system in Papua New Guinea.

The romance of equality is attractive, but scientific understanding should be based on evidence.


_________________
http://rtulip.net


The following user would like to thank Robert Tulip for this post:
DWill, Saffron
Mon Nov 28, 2011 8:02 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
Robert Tulip wrote:
heledd wrote:
It’s unfortunate that Diamond, using totally subjective evidence, states that New Guineans are ‘more intelligent’ than the average American or European.


...I see this seemingly absurd statement as more a preemptive comment to deflect accusations that his geographic determinism is racist.

I think you've hit the nail right on the head.

Robert Tulip wrote:
The romance of equality is attractive, but scientific understanding should be based on evidence.

Agree!


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


The following user would like to thank Saffron for this post:
Robert Tulip
Mon Nov 28, 2011 8:10 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pulitzer Prize Finalist


Joined: Oct 2011
Posts: 488
Thanks: 44
Thanked: 113 times in 95 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Gambia (gm)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
I’m rather confused by Diamond’s explanation of the mass extinction of larger animals from the Americas and Australia.
One hypothesis is that these animals had not learned any fear of humans. But surely it is not the absence of humans but the absence of predators which makes animals in places such as the Galapagos so tame?

And the Americas he describes has ‘herds of elephants and horses pursued by lions and cheetahs’, so the animals would have attacked anyone who seemed vulnerable.

Also, the dodo’s of Mauritius were plentiful up until 1662, and could be herded around like sheep by Portugese and other maritime nations. Three birds could feed a crew of 150. So it was not the hunter / gatherers that killed these birds, but modern Europeans, the last bird dying in 1790.
http://h2g2.com/dna/h2g2/A3852777
The moas vanished at about 1500,
Although there is evidence that the giant lemurs were consumed by the local population, they also seem to have survived until recent times. This website also postulates that it was the ecological change created by the hunter gathers which added to their demise. Spores of a fungus which depended on its life cycle on the dung of large animals dramatically declined after the arrival of humans, and its decline also triggered a decline in the larger lemurs, and other herbivores.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subfossil_lemur

As Diamond comments, no one has yet documented the bones of an extinct Australian giant with compelling evidence of its having been killed by humans.
I agree that climate change is also unlikely, but the fact that these animals disappeared soon after modern man arrived on the new continents does not necessarily mean they were hunted to extinction.


_________________
Life's a glitch and then you die - The Simpsons


The following user would like to thank heledd for this post:
DWill, Saffron
Tue Nov 29, 2011 6:37 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
heledd wrote:
I’m rather confused by Diamond’s explanation of the mass extinction of larger animals from the Americas and Australia.
One hypothesis is that these animals had not learned any fear of humans. But surely it is not the absence of humans but the absence of predators which makes animals in places such as the Galapagos so tame?


Humans are predators. I think Diamond would agree with the statement you imply: Animals learn to be shy, skittish, or in short to be fearful when they evolve with predators; including or excluding humans.

I feel some skepticism about Diamond's explanation of the extinction of mega fauna. It seems there is no doubt that the extinctions coincide with the arrival of humans. Here is where it gets fuzzy for me; it seems like some of the extinctions have happened only after a second group, the Europeans, arrive on the scene. If this is so, it seems to me something more complex is going on, more culutrally driven than Diamonds explanation .


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Tue Nov 29, 2011 7:16 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Preface, Prologue, and Part One
"Cultural drivers" are the key things to look at, probably, when examining D.'s theories.

I had another comment on the supposed greater intelligence of New Guineans. If D. is proposing that New Guineans have evolved to become more intelligent, and Americans have evolved to become less intelligent, the only way this could have happened is for the 'smarter' (whatever trait might be deemed to equal smartness) New Guinea men and women to have survived at a greater rate into their reproductive years, and for the opposite scenario to have played out for the dumber U.S. TV watchers, i.e., absorbing media passively somehow conferred a reproductive advantage. I can see in the first case how that might come about, but it seems there would have to be quite an extreme situation of unchecked violence in New Guinea for the effect to be real. In the case of the U.S. children, I can't see it. We're talking about an extremely brief time span, and if there cold be an evolutionary effect it would be in the other direction, where the minority who didn't sit in front of the TV gained a reproductive advantage over the others. It sounds ridiculous. Whatever bad effects TV has on development, they don't become a genetic influence on the next generation. The effects are acquired.

The extinction hypothesis seems to hinge partly on the ability of animals to evolve a specific fear of humans, vs. a general fear of predators. I like heledd's point on this, but I also wonder how in the Americas animals could evolve without the presence of predators. It seems that absence of predators has usually been caused by human interference in ecosystems.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:24 am
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 46 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books

Books by New Authors



Booktalk.org on Facebook 



BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
Sense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

cron
Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2014. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank