Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Jul 23, 2016 6:05 pm

<< Week of July 23, 2016 >>
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
23 Day Month

24 Day Month

25 Day Month

26 Day Month

27 Day Month

28 Day Month

29 Day Month





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2
A discussion of the Introduction (page 11 - 30) 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Professor

Silver Contributor

Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 3542
Location: NJ
Thanks: 2
Thanked: 14 times in 10 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
From: WebMD Article

Quote:
7 Rules for Eating
Choose Food Over Food-Like Substances, Food Writer Michael Pollan Tells CDC
By Daniel J. DeNoon
WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Louise Chang, MDMarch 23, 2009 -- We Americans suffer a national eating disorder: our unhealthy obsession with healthy eating.

That's the diagnosis delivered by food author Michael Pollan in a lecture given last week to an overflow crowd of CDC scientists.

As part of an effort to bring new ideas to the national debate on food issues, the CDC invited Pollan -- a harsh critic of U.S. food policies -- to address CDC researchers and to meet with leaders of the federal agency.

"The French paradox is that they have better heart health than we do despite being a cheese-eating, wine-swilling, fois-gras-gobbling people," Pollan said. "The American paradox is we are a people who worry unreasonably about dietary health yet have the worst diet in the world."

In various parts of the world, Pollan noted, necessity has forced human beings to adapt to all kinds of diets.

"The Masai subsist on cattle blood and meat and milk and little else. Native Americans subsist on beans and maize. And the Inuit in Greenland subsist on whale blubber and a little bit of lichen," he said. "The irony is, the one diet we have invented for ourselves -- the Western diet -- is the one that makes us sick."

Snowballing rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease in the U.S. can be traced to our unhealthy diet. So how do we change?

7 Words & 7 Rules for Eating
Pollan says everything he's learned about food and health can be summed up in seven words: "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants."

Probably the first two words are most important. "Eat food" means to eat real food -- vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and, yes, fish and meat -- and to avoid what Pollan calls "edible food-like substances."

Here's how:

Don't eat anything your great grandmother wouldn't recognize as food. "When you pick up that box of portable yogurt tubes, or eat something with 15 ingredients you can't pronounce, ask yourself, "What are those things doing there?" Pollan says.
Don’t eat anything with more than five ingredients, or ingredients you can't pronounce.
Stay out of the middle of the supermarket; shop on the perimeter of the store. Real food tends to be on the outer edge of the store near the loading docks, where it can be replaced with fresh foods when it goes bad.
Don't eat anything that won't eventually rot. "There are exceptions -- honey -- but as a rule, things like Twinkies that never go bad aren't food," Pollan says.
It is not just what you eat but how you eat. "Always leave the table a little hungry," Pollan says. "Many cultures have rules that you stop eating before you are full. In Japan, they say eat until you are four-fifths full. Islamic culture has a similar rule, and in German culture they say, 'Tie off the sack before it's full.'"
Families traditionally ate together, around a table and not a TV, at regular meal times. It's a good tradition. Enjoy meals with the people you love. "Remember when eating between meals felt wrong?" Pollan asks.
Don't buy food where you buy your gasoline. In the U.S., 20% of food is eaten in the car....



See article for the rest....



Fri Aug 07, 2009 12:39 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Moderator
Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 6846
Location: California
Thanks: 1014
Thanked: 1935 times in 1565 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
I think it's essential to examine your current beliefs, to take away their 'free pass' so to speak. The problem is it would take lifetimes to do such a thing. I guess the key is to make it a habit to be aware of when, during a discussion, you promote a position or belief without any support, then make a mental note to examine that position or belief. A good indicator is when you feel emotionally attached to an idea, or are overly convinced of something. Making it a habit to lock on to these feelings then examining the associated beliefs is a good habit.

If we are all inconsistent critical thinkers, we all have somewhat major beliefs that have been given a free pass. I challenge everyone discussing this book to find such a belief of their own and post it here. The author uses his belief of what types of foods he should eat as an example.



Fri Aug 07, 2009 1:48 pm
Profile
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 5510
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1370
Thanked: 1378 times in 1076 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
Maybe it'd be a good habit to "recuse" ourselves from a particular discussion when we realize we are too emotionally attached; you know, like judges do.


_________________
No, it is impossible; it is impossible to convey the life-sensation of any given epoch of one's existence--that which makes its truth, its meaning--its subtle penetrating essence. It is impossible. We live as we dream--alone.

Joseph Conrad, The Heart of Darkness


Fri Aug 07, 2009 10:14 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Thinks Night Out is Reading on Porch

BookTalk.org Moderator
Platinum Contributor

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 3981
Location: NC
Thanks: 1522
Thanked: 1608 times in 1224 posts
Gender: Male

Post 
Interbane wrote:
If we are all inconsistent critical thinkers, we all have somewhat major beliefs that have been given a free pass. I challenge everyone discussing this book to find such a belief of their own and post it here.


So far I can't think of anything that is being given a free pass (although I have no doubt there are many there). I think this is a great assignment and I will continue trying to ferret out some erroneous belief so that I may expose it to the light of day.

In the meantime here's something I discovered a few years ago. I consider myself something of an audiophile and one thing I used to accept without question is the superiority of high-end speaker wire. Companies like Monster cable claim superiority over your standard Radio Shack brand and charge significantly more. A few years back, James Randi offered Pear Cable Company a million dollars to prove their $7,250 speaker wire was better than Monster in double blind tests, but I don't think anything came of that. I am not aware of any large scale double blind tests that show either way, but these days I do question the validity and wisdom of spending so much money for speaker wire. It seems very likely that most people, at least, would simply not be able to tell the difference.


_________________
-Geo
Question everything


Sun Aug 09, 2009 11:45 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Sophomore


Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 266
Location: Riverhead, Long Island
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 6 times in 5 posts
Gender: Male

Post 
DWill wrote:
Maybe it'd be a good habit to "recuse" ourselves from a particular discussion when we realize we are too emotionally attached; you know, like judges do.


Great point. There is another option besides recusing yourself, you can just ask questions. I've been doing this lately anytime the topic of religion comes up. Instead of rebutting the other persons argument, I ask them to tell me more. I act interested in their viewpoints and ask probing questions.

I know I am too emotional when it comes to religion, my wife calls me an evangelical athiest. When I stop talking and start listening I do learn new things (although they generally reinforce my already-held beliefs).



Tue Aug 11, 2009 3:54 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Moderator
Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 6846
Location: California
Thanks: 1014
Thanked: 1935 times in 1565 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
On a side note, everything I'm reading so far in this book is making me think I'm very much a critical thinker(a good one even!), even without having any classes or training. It's all been an excellent addition to things I already know, but I haven't come across anything new yet. I know, this sounds arrogant, I'm sorry. I'm still a woefully inconsistent critical thinker...



Tue Aug 11, 2009 4:55 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Sophomore


Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 266
Location: Riverhead, Long Island
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 6 times in 5 posts
Gender: Male

Post Evolution
Page 18 - "It is a fundamental flaw to assume that the mind is not influenced by the process of natural selection and that critical thinking skills exempt us from biases that are part of our evolutionary heritage."

Page 24 - "the purpose here is not to attack Asimov personally, but to illustrate the point that everyone, even an outstanding critical thinker and someone as brilliant as Asimov, is influenced by our evolutionary heritage."

It seems that he is implying that biases are a result of natural selection. If this were to be so, there would have to be some evolutionary advantage to these biases. I find this intriguing. Does anyone have any insight into this?



Tue Aug 11, 2009 11:13 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
BookTalk.org Hall of Fame

BookTalk.org Moderator
Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 6846
Location: California
Thanks: 1014
Thanked: 1935 times in 1565 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post 
Yes, he gives insight into how these biases were advantageous to our survival. One example is that we err on the side of belief when we see a pattern. If you see a pattern of stripes in the grass, it would serve you well to believe that it's a tiger, even if it's not. If you're wrong, the consequences are minimal. If you're right, you avoided potential death by acting on this belief and retreating to safety. There are many such examples, but it's easy to see why erring on the side of belief is a bias that is advantageous to survival.



Wed Aug 12, 2009 1:17 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Masters


Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 467
Location: canada
Thanks: 66
Thanked: 179 times in 132 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Canada (ca)

Post 
We all have our bias. Even psychotherapists will generally set up what is called “supervision” with a colleague. This means finding someone, preferably more experienced, with whom one can bounce off aspects of problematic cases where bias may be unsuspectedly creeping in.

I am sure I have my own set. I guess one of mine is apparent in my posting on medical insurance.



Thu Aug 13, 2009 4:42 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:



Site Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

Featured Books

Books by New Authors


*

FACTS is a select group of active BookTalk.org members passionate about promoting Freethought, Atheism, Critical Thinking and Science.

Apply to join FACTS
See who else is in FACTS







BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.



Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2016. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank