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Moby Dick Chapter 55 Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales. 
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Post Moby Dick Chapter 55 Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2701/270 ... m#2HCH0055

Melville explains that the whale, being mostly under water in its natural habitat, is hard to draw accurately.
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Nor are the most conscientious compilations of Natural History for the benefit of the young and tender, free from the same heinousness of mistake. Look at that popular work "Goldsmith's Animated Nature." In the abridged London edition of 1807, there are plates of an alleged "whale" and a "narwhale." I do not wish to seem inelegant, but this unsightly whale looks much like an amputated sow; and, as for the narwhale, one glimpse at it is enough to amaze one, that in this nineteenth century such a hippogriff could be palmed for genuine upon any intelligent public of schoolboys.

http://www.johncoulthart.com/feuilleton ... of-whales/ discusses this chapter and shows the following incorrect drawings
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these manifold mistakes in depicting the whale are not so very surprising after all. Consider! Most of the scientific drawings have been taken from the stranded fish; and these are about as correct as a drawing of a wrecked ship, with broken back, would correctly represent the noble animal itself in all its undashed pride of hull and spars. Though elephants have stood for their full-lengths, the living Leviathan has never yet fairly floated himself for his portrait. The living whale, in his full majesty and significance, is only to be seen at sea in unfathomable waters; and afloat the vast bulk of him is out of sight, like a launched line-of-battle ship; and out of that element it is a thing eternally impossible for mortal man to hoist him bodily into the air, so as to preserve all his mighty swells and undulations. And, not to speak of the highly presumable difference of contour between a young sucking whale and a full-grown Platonian Leviathan; yet, even in the case of one of those young sucking whales hoisted to a ship's deck, such is then the outlandish, eel-like, limbered, varying shape of him, that his precise expression the devil himself could not catch.

Melville therefore concludes, after describing the errors of various fertile imaginings in the drawing of whales
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For all these reasons, then, any way you may look at it, you must needs conclude that the great Leviathan is that one creature in the world which must remain unpainted to the last. True, one portrait may hit the mark much nearer than another, but none can hit it with any very considerable degree of exactness. So there is no earthly way of finding out precisely what the whale really looks like. And the only mode in which you can derive even a tolerable idea of his living contour, is by going a whaling yourself; but by so doing, you run no small risk of being eternally stove and sunk by him. Wherefore, it seems to me you had best not be too fastidious in your curiosity touching this Leviathan.

This chapter has its very own wikipedia page http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Moby-Dick/Chapter_55 with this picture of Goldsmith's whales mentioned above.
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Oh, and I can't pass up Hogarth's picture of Perseus, Andromeda and the whale, noting as well that these three are immortalised in the heavens, with the whale known as Cetus - http://www.flickr.com/photos/miyaoka/3444363258/ and nearly immortalised on a Grecian Urn.
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Melville says
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But go to the old Galleries, and look now at a great Christian painter's portrait of this fish; for he succeeds no better than the antediluvian Hindoo. It is Guido's picture of Perseus rescuing Andromeda from the sea-monster or whale. Where did Guido get the model of such a strange creature as that? Nor does Hogarth, in painting the same scene in his own "Perseus Descending," make out one whit better. The huge corpulence of that Hogarthian monster undulates on the surface, scarcely drawing one inch of water. It has a sort of howdah on its back, and its distended tusked mouth into which the billows are rolling, might be taken for the Traitors' Gate leading from the Thames by water into the Tower.
This is discussed at http://ticklemebrahms.blogspot.com.au/2 ... chive.html

Here is the vase
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Mon May 07, 2012 5:25 am
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Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 55 Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales.
Surely these chapters on depictions of whales needed to put in an appendix! They illustrate why MD is a very good candidate for abridgment. I had a downsized version, in fact, but I can't find it now.


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Mon May 07, 2012 6:15 am
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Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 55 Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales.
Yes, thanks for the links, Robert. They seem to be adaptations of creatures the artist already knew, weird looking dolphins, and monstrous lung fish. I wonder, though, why there were no drawings by sailors. there must have been artists amongt them


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