Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Mon Dec 22, 2014 4:20 pm

<< Week of December 22, 2014 >>
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
22 Day Month

23 Day Month

24 Day Month

25 Day Month

26 Day Month

27 Day Month

28 Day Month





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 122 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 9  Next
Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Thread Flintstone

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 890
Thanks: 122
Thanked: 196 times in 158 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
Great poem Saffron, amazing images of early morning Kingston. Honestly, I would not generally see poets as early morning people but really the early morning is a 'poetic' time of day, is it not? And Oblivion, thanks for your reference to 'ekphrasis' - had to look that one up, quite interesting. Here is a Conor O'Callaghan poem, an achy-brekymissing you kind of poem but I think with some interesting self-reflection ....

Three Six Five Zero

I called up tech and got the voicemail code.
It’s taken me this long to find my feet.
Since last we spoke that evening it has snowed.

Fifty-four new messages. Most are old
and blinking into a future months complete.
I contacted tech to get my voicemail code

to hear your voice, not some bozo on the road
the week of Thanksgiving dubbing me his sweet
and breaking up and bleating how it snowed

the Nashville side of Chattanooga and slowed
the beltway to a standstill. The radio said sleet.
The kid in tech sent on my voicemail code.

I blew a night on lightening the system’s load,
woke to white enveloping the trees, the street
that’s blanked out by my leaving. It had snowed.

Lately others’ pasts will turn me cold.
I heard out every message, pressed delete.
I’d happily forget my voice, the mail, its code.
We spoke at last that evening. Then it snowed.

Conor O'Callaghan



The following user would like to thank giselle for this post:
Saffron
Fri Apr 06, 2012 9:16 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4992
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1102
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
from Meditations in Times of Civil War, by W. B. Yeats

VI. The Stare's Nest by My Window

The bees build in the crevices
Of loosening masonry, and there
The mother birds bring grubs and flies.
My wall is loosening; honey-bees,
Come build in the empty house of the stare.

We are closed in, and the key is turned
On our uncertainty; somewhere
A man is killed, or a house burned,
Yet no clear fact to be discerned:
Come build in he empty house of the stare.

A barricade of stone or of wood;
Some fourteen days of civil war;
Last night they trundled down the road
That dead young soldier in his blood:
Come build in the empty house of the stare.

We had fed the heart on fantasies,
The heart's grown brutal from the fare;
More Substance in our enmities
Than in our love; O honey-bees,
Come build in the empty house of the stare.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Last edited by DWill on Fri Apr 06, 2012 9:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.



The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
Saffron
Fri Apr 06, 2012 9:29 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
My 7 is in a poem that many will know, so I will play a game within a game - guess my poem!

"If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year.
Do you suppose," the Walrus said,
"That they could get it clear?"
"I doubt it," said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

*This should be very easy, as the title is practically in the lines of poetry.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sat Apr 07, 2012 7:18 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4992
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1102
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
Saffron wrote:
My 7 is in a poem that many will know, so I will play a game within a game - guess my poem!

"If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year.
Do you suppose," the Walrus said,
"That they could get it clear?"
"I doubt it," said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

*This should be very easy, as the title is practically in the lines of poetry.

Is it "The Walrus and the Carpenter?" Good find. There should be extra points for numbers within poems.

IN THE SEVEN WOODS

by: William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)

I HAVE heard the pigeons of the Seven Woods
Make their faint thunder, and the garden bees
Hum in the lime-tree flowers; and put away
The unavailing outcries and the old bitterness
That empty the heart. I have forgot awhile
Tara uprooted, and new commonness
Upon the throne and crying about the streets
And hanging its paper flowers from post to post,
Because it is alone of all things happy.
I am contented, for I know that Quiet
Wanders laughing and eating her wild heart
Among pigeons and bees, while that Great Archer,
Who but awaits His hour to shoot, still hangs
A cloudy quiver over Pairc-na-lee.

Well, it's not in the first rank of Yeats' poems, I admit, but it has some good effects. "Pairc-na-lee is one of the seven woods on the estate of Lady Gregory, Yeats' patron. It translates, somewhat confusedly, as "field of calves." Yeats wasn't usually much for nature poetry. This and "Lake Isle of Innisfree" are rare examples.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Last edited by DWill on Sat Apr 07, 2012 7:33 am, edited 1 time in total.



Sat Apr 07, 2012 7:32 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
DWill wrote:
Saffron wrote:
My 7 is in a poem that many will know, so I will play a game within a game - guess my poem!

"If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year.
Do you suppose," the Walrus said,
"That they could get it clear?"
"I doubt it," said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

*This should be very easy, as the title is practically in the lines of poetry.

Is it "The Walrus and the Carpenter?" Good find. There should be extra points for numbers within poems.

Of course you are correct. I'm not sure I deserve extra points for the poem, but maybe for the creative way I figured out to find poems with numbers within.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sat Apr 07, 2012 7:37 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Thread Flintstone

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 890
Thanks: 122
Thanked: 196 times in 158 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
I know this is a well-known, maybe even tired poem but its a pretty good seven poem and I decided to post it before someone else does! :twisted: Not sure if I like the poem, and I do wonder about a dude who would question a child's judgement in this way .. why not just accept that her dead brother and sister are exactly that - her brother and sister - so they are indeed seven? Oh well, just the way I see it. It is a good 'number poem when you take a closer look - there are seven mentions of 'seven' (if you count the title) and several other numbers appear as well, to wit, eight, five, two and twelve ... that's a lot of numbers for a poem in my estimation. And for number freaks, the total number of numbers = 18 and the title plus the number of stanzas = 18 as well. Coincidence? Maybe Wordsworth was a closet mathematician and poetry was just his day job?

We Are Seven

A simple child...
That lightly draws its breath
And feels its life in every limb,
What should it know of death?

I met a little cottage girl-
She was eight years old, she said;
Her hair was thick with many a curl
That clustered 'round her head.

She had a rustic, woodland air
And she was wildly clad;
Her eyes were fair, and very fair;
Her beauty made me glad.

"Sisters and brothers, little maid,
How many may you be?"
"How many? Seven in all," she said
And wondering looked at me.

"And where are they? I pray you tell."
She answered, "Seven are we;
And two of us at Conway dwell
And two are gone to sea."

"Two of us in the churchyard lie,
My sister and my brother
And in the churchyard cottage, I
Dwell near them with my mother."

"You say that two at Conway dwell
And two are gone to sea,
Yet, ye are seven! I pray you tell,
Sweet maid, how this may be."

Then did the little maid reply,
"Seven boys and girls are we;
Two of us in the churchyard lie,
Beneath the churchyard tree."

"You run about, my little maid,
Your limbs they are alive;
If two are in the churchyard laid
Then ye are only five."

"Their graves are green, they may be seen,"
The little maid replied,
"Twelve steps or more from my mother's door
And they are side by side."

"My stockings there I often knit,
My kerchief there I hem;
And there upon the ground I sit
And sing a song to them."

"And often after sunset, sir,
When it is light and fair
I take my little porringer
And eat my supper there."

"The first that died was sister Jane;
In bed she moaning lay,
Till God released her of her pain
And then she went away."

"So in the churchyard she was laid
And, when the grass was dry
Together round her grave we played,
My brother John and I."

"And when the ground was white with snow
And I could run and slide,
My brother John was forced to go
And he lies by her side."

"How many are you, then," said I,
"If they two are in heaven?"
Quick was the little maid's reply,
"O master! We are seven."

"But they are dead; those two are dead!
Their spirits are in heaven!"
'T was throwing words away; for still
The little maid would have her will
And said... "Nay, we are seven!"

William Wordsworth



Sat Apr 07, 2012 5:17 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4992
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1102
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
I agree with you comments about the poem, Giselle. But, right, it's a famous "7." Compared to the rest of the poetry of Wordsworth's day, this was not that sentimental, but today it is.

Looks like it's time for the number eight (is this Sesame Street?).

Eighth Air Force

If, in an odd angle of the hutment,
A puppy laps the water from a can
Of flowers, and the drunk sergeant shaving
Whistles O Paradiso!--shall I say that man
Is not as men have said: a wolf to man?

The other murderers troop in yawning;
Three of them play Pitch, one sleeps, and one
Lies counting missions, lies there sweating
Till even his heart beats: One; One; One.
O murderers! . . . Still, this is how it's done:

This is a war . . . But since these play, before they die,
Like puppies with their puppy; since, a man,
I did as these have done, but did not die--
I will content the people as I can
And give up these to them: Behold the man!

I have suffered, in a dream, because of him,
Many things; for this last saviour, man,
I have lied as I lie now. But what is lying?
Men wash their hands, in blood, as best they can:
I find no fault in this just man.

Randall Jarrell

Note: a hutment is an encampment of huts.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Last edited by DWill on Sat Apr 07, 2012 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.



The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
giselle
Sat Apr 07, 2012 8:49 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
I have two poems to post for number 8. The extra poem is just because I want to post an E. Dickinson and you will see, it is a little stretch.

Number 8

It was a face which darkness could kill
in an instant
a face as easily hurt
by laughter or light

'We think differently at night'
she told me once
lying back languidly

And she would quote Cocteau

'I feel there is an angel in me' she'd say
'whom I am constantly shocking'

Then she would smile and look away
light a cigarette for me
sigh and rise

and stretch
her sweet anatomy

let fall a stocking
~~Lawrence Ferlinghetti



Now, find the 8 in this poem -

A Bird came down the Walk
by Emily Dickinson


A Bird came down the Walk—
He did not know I saw—
He bit an Angleworm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,

And then he drank a Dew
From a convenient Grass—
And then hopped sidewise to the Wall
To let a Beetle pass—

He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all around—
They looked like frightened Beads, I thought—
He stirred his Velvet Head

Like one in danger, Cautious,
I offered him a Crumb
And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home—

Than Oars divide the Ocean,
Too silver for a seam—
Or Butterflies, off Banks of Noon
Leap, plashless as they swim.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:31 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
DWill wrote:
I agree with you comments about the poem, Giselle. But, right, it's a famous "7." Compared to the rest of the poetry of Wordsworth's day, this was not that sentimental, but today it is.

Looks like it's time for the number eight (is this Sesame Street?)

Good poem. Now to get off topic. I love Sesame Street, or did when my kids were young. One of the counting segments from the early years of SS has a bitty boy of about 3, named John John. John John tells Grover he loves him and Grover says he loves John John, who responds with count this penny. All very cute. All these years later two people form a hip Bluegrassy type band have named themselves Count this Penny. They have a great song called, Big Tall Pines.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSyY6BkcNu4

Back to poetry; who knew there would be so many numbers imbedded in poems. It seems that numbers actually make frequent appearances in poetry. They are used to form a structure to hang a poem on or used to show movement or create rhythm (which makes sense). I will try to notice when I find examples of these techniques and point them out. One more thing, while searching through all of my books for numbers in poems, I've been reminded of how much I like Now & Then: The Poet's Choice Columns 1997-2000 by Robert Hass. I hightly recomend it. I especially enjoyed the September 12,1999 column.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


The following user would like to thank Saffron for this post:
giselle
Sun Apr 08, 2012 9:16 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Thread Flintstone

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 890
Thanks: 122
Thanked: 196 times in 158 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
My kids would hide their eyes when the the 'cream pie' guy on Sesame Street would come on ... "twelve cream pies .... " and then he'd fall down the stairs or whatever. It wasn't a matter of suspense, they knew what was going to happen and so they didn't want to watch. Bird on the Walk is a great Dickinson poem, I enjoy it every time I read it, there is something tentative about the Bird that is endearing ... and it taught me a new word .. 'plashless'. I read over Dickinson a few times but failed to come up with the 8, so now feeling puzzled ?? Please don't tell me its obvious ... :-?

You're right that numbers provide something to hang a poem on .. or maybe a song? I was thinking of Bill Haley, Rock around the Clock (careful, it's an ear worm) ... and that led me to an 'eight' song from one of the best 70's bands of all (in my humble view), so I'm going to take some liberty and cross the bridge from poetry to song for my '8' contribution ...

Pieces Of Eight

It's six O'clock, good morning sounds are everywhere
The warmth of spring, a gentle breeze blows through my hair
I hurry through my life never stopping to see
How beautiful it was meant to be

I'm just a prisoner in a king's disguise
Broken dreams as we shuffle by

It's six O'clock, it's quitting time I'm done for the day
Out on the streets, I overheard a lady say
We now have everything, or so people say
But now this emptiness haunts me every day

We seek the lion's share never knowing why
Come alive spread your wings and fly

Pieces of eight, the search for the money tree
Don't cash your freedoms in for gold
Pieces of eight can't buy you everything
Don't let it turn your heart to stone

Styx



Sun Apr 08, 2012 3:02 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
giselle wrote:
I read over Dickinson a few times but failed to come up with the 8, so now feeling puzzled ?? Please don't tell me its obvious ... :-?

Remember I said it was kind of a cheat. The "8" in ED's poem is not a true "8", but rather a homophone. Enough said for you to find the 8?


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:04 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
Number 9

The Lake Isle of Innisfree
by W. B. Yeats

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:
Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee;
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,
Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
There midnight's all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,
And evening full of the linnet's wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day
I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;
While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,
I hear it in the deep heart's core.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:04 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
Today must be a busy day; for I am alone in posting a #9. Who knows, maybe still there will be a late comer. I will post my #10. This is a poem I like very much.

The Oven Bird
By Robert Frost


There is a singer everyone has heard,
Loud, a mid-summer and a mid-wood bird,
Who makes the solid tree trunks sound again.
He says that leaves are old and that for flowers
Mid-summer is to spring as one to ten.
He says the early petal-fall is past
When pear and cherry bloom went down in showers
On sunny days a moment overcast;
And comes that other fall we name the fall.
He says the highway dust is over all.
The bird would cease and be as other birds
But that he knows in singing not to sing.
The question that he frames in all but words
Is what to make of a diminished thing.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Mon Apr 09, 2012 7:34 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4992
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1102
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
Giselle, you're right--that is a good Styx song. I had the idea they were 80s, but it's all a blur. Saffron I thought was going to use a different Yeats. He seemed to stock his poems with a lot of numbers.

The Wild Swans at Coole

THE TREES are in their autumn beauty,
The woodland paths are dry,
Under the October twilight the water
Mirrors a still sky;
Upon the brimming water among the stones 5
Are nine and fifty swans.

The nineteenth Autumn has come upon me
Since I first made my count;
I saw, before I had well finished,
All suddenly mount 10
And scatter wheeling in great broken rings
Upon their clamorous wings.

I have looked upon those brilliant creatures,
And now my heart is sore.
All’s changed since I, hearing at twilight, 15
The first time on this shore,
The bell-beat of their wings above my head,
Trod with a lighter tread.

Unwearied still, lover by lover,
They paddle in the cold, 20
Companionable streams or climb the air;
Their hearts have not grown old;
Passion or conquest, wander where they will,
Attend upon them still.

But now they drift on the still water 25
Mysterious, beautiful;
Among what rushes will they build,
By what lake’s edge or pool
Delight men’s eyes, when I awake some day
To find they have flown away? 30

Another that I found, in complete contrast to the Yeats...

The Temperaments

Nine adulteries, 12 liaisons, 64 fornications and
something approaching a rape
Rest nightly upon the soul of our delicate friend
Florialis,
And yet the man is so quiet and reserved in demeanour
That he passes for both bloodless and sexless.
Bastidides, on the contrary, who both talks and writes
of nothing save copulation,
Has become the father of twins,
But he accomplished this feat at some cost;
He had to be four times cuckold.

Ezra Pound


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Mon Apr 09, 2012 9:31 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poetry by Numbers: National Poetry Month game
DWill wrote:
Giselle, you're right--that is a good Styx song. I had the idea they were 80s, but it's all a blur. Saffron I thought was going to use a different Yeats. He seemed to stock his poems with a lot of numbers.


You are right, DWill. I had intended to use the same Yeats that you posted, but thought instead to use it for 19; 19 being a much harder number to find in a poem. That Ezra Pound is almost shocking to read, but there rings a real truth to it. It has been my experience that sometimes the person who is most vocal about sex (I think it holds for other subjects too) is sometimes the one least engaged in the activity and of course the contrary holds as well.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:42 am
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 122 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 9  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books

Poll

Yes  83%  [5]
No  16%  [1]
Total votes: 6

Books by New Authors

Visual Help for Getting Started


Top Posters

Of all time: Chris OConnor (14267), Interbane (5671), DWill (4992), stahrwe (4610), Robert Tulip (4322), Mr. Pessimistic (3542), johnson1010 (3345), geo (3316), ant (3159), Penelope (2971), Saffron (2860), Suzanne (2505), Frank 013 (2021), Dissident Heart (1796), bleachededen (1680), President Camacho (1614), Ophelia (1543), Dexter (1466), youkrst (1389), tat tvam asi (1298)

Of the last 24 hrs: eevalancaster (2), Interbane (2), Gnostic Bishop (2), Robert Tulip (2), Suzanne (1), Taylor (1), Churchy LaFemme (1), Dexter (1), dgudema (1), youkrst (1), John Tidball (1), Chris OConnor (1), Cattleman (1), magicwonder (1), Flann 5 (1), Saffron (1), J A Jackson (1), geo (1)




BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
King Henry IV, Part 1 - by William ShakespeareAtheist Mind, Humanist Heart - by Lex Bayer and John FigdorSense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2014. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank