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Moby Dick Chapter 6 The Street 
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Post Moby Dick Chapter 6 The Street
Whaling produces the strangest sights, even a Yankee in Bombay. There is a sense here of Gulliver’s Travels, with all the strange cultures cheek eating jowl. The Feegeeans, Tongatabooarrs, Erromanggoans, Pannangians, and Brighggians are like Lilliput and Blefuscu. And the doffing to Swift seems deliberate, with the satirical undercurrent flowing barely concealed. The comedy of hardy Vermonter backwoodsmen, Yankee Bumpkin Dandy in bespoke bell buttons come to try their luck and strike a fortune in the blubber trade, helps make New Bedford queer.

The astonishing thing here is the great wealth that comes from the sea, making the rude whalers wealthy beyond their dreams, with homage to their butchery shown in the harpoons festooning the sculpture gardens, recklessly burning the distilled head of the great sperm whale with sheer indifference to the animal suffering and waste.

The musky scent of these puritanic sands of New England presents a further contradiction. It seems puritanism is a good recipe to acquire wealth, but perhaps not to keep it.

Herman Melville wrote:
Chapter vi THE STREET >
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2701/270 ... m#2HCH0006
If I had been astonished at first catching a glimpse of so outlandish an individual as Queequeg circulating among the polite society of a civilized town, that astonishment soon departed upon taking my first daylight stroll through the streets of New Bedford. In thoroughfares nigh the docks, any considerable seaport will frequently offer to view the queerest looking nondescripts from foreign parts. Even in Broadway and Chestnut streets, Mediterranean mariners will sometimes jostle the affrighted ladies. Regent street is not unknown to Lascars and Malays; and at Bombay, in the Apollo Green, live Yankees have often scared the natives. But New Bedford beats all Water street and Wapping. In these last-mentioned haunts you see only sailors; but in New Bedford, actual cannibals stand chatting at street corners; savages outright; many of whom yet carry on their bones unholy flesh. It makes a stranger stare. But, besides the Feegeeans, Tongatabooarrs, Erromanggoans, Pannangians, and Brighggians, and, besides the wild specimens of the whaling-craft which unheeded reel about the streets, you will see other sights still more curious, certainly more comical. ..

<p 32 > There weekly arrive in this town scores of green Vermonters and New Hampshire men, all athirst for gain and glory in the fishery. They are mostly young, of stalwart frames; fellows who have felled forests, and now seek to drop the axe and snatch the whale-lance. Many are as green as the Green Mountains whence they came. In some things you would think them but a few hours old. Look there! that chap strutting round the corner. He wears a beaver hat and swallow-tailed coat, girdled with a sailor-belt and sheath-knife. Here comes another with a sou'-wester and a bombazine cloak. No town-bred dandy will compare with a country-bred one -- I mean a downright bumpkin dandy --a fellow that, in the dog-days, will mow his two acres in buckskin gloves for fear of tanning his hands. Now when a country dandy like this takes it into his head to make a distinguished reputation, and joins the great whale-fishery, you should see the comical things he does upon reaching the seaport. In bespeaking his sea-outfit, he orders bell-buttons to his waistcoats; straps to his canvas trowsers. Ah, poor Hay-Seed! how bitterly will burst those straps in the first howling gale, when thou art driven, straps, buttons, and all, down the throat of the tempest. But think not that this famous town has only harpooneers, cannibals, and bumpkins to show her visitors. Not at all. Still New Bedford is a queer place. Had it not been for us whalemen, that tract of land would this day perhaps have been in as howling condition as the coast of Labrador. As it is, parts of her back country are enough to frighten one, they look so bony. The town itself is perhaps the dearest place to live in, in all New England. It is a land of oil, true enough; but not like Canaan; a land, also, of corn and wine. The streets do not run with milk; nor in the spring-time do they pave them with fresh eggs. Yet, in spite of this, nowhere in all America will you find more patrician-like houses; parks and gardens more opulent, than in New Bedford. Whence came they? how planted upon this once scraggy scoria of a country? Go and gaze upon the iron emblematical harpoons round yonder lofty mansion, and your question will be answered. Yes; all these brave houses and flowery gardens came from the ..

<p 33 > Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. One and all, they were harpooned and dragged up hither from the bottom of the sea. Can Herr Alexander perform a feat like that? In New Bedford, fathers, they say, give whales for dowers to their daughters, and portion off their nieces with a few porpoises a-piece. You must go to New Bedford to see a brilliant wedding; for, they say, they have reservoirs of oil in every house, and every night recklessly burn their lengths in spermaceti candles. In summer time, the town is sweet to see; full of fine maples --long avenues of green and gold. And in August, high in air, the beautiful and bountiful horse-chestnuts, candelabra-wise, proffer the passer-by their tapering upright cones of congregated blossoms. So omnipotent is art; which in many a district of New Bedford has superinduced bright terraces of flowers upon the barren refuse rocks thrown aside at creation's final day. And the women of New Bedford, they bloom like their own red roses. But roses only bloom in summer; whereas the fine carnation of their cheeks is perennial as sunlight in the seventh heavens. Elsewhere match that bloom of theirs, ye cannot, save in Salem, where they tell me the young girls breathe such musk, their sailor sweethearts smell them miles off shore, as though they were drawing nigh the odorous Moluccas instead of the Puritanic sands.


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Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 6 The Street
I hadn't noticed the Swiftian reference - though Melville's satire here is much gentler, I think.

Women, as flowers, make a brief appearance. Do women ever appear in Melville other than as a scented suggestion? Presumably the reference to musk and Salem is a glance back at Hawthorne and sexual danger?



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Post Re: Moby Dick Chapter 6 The Street
Chris27 wrote:
I hadn't noticed the Swiftian reference - though Melville's satire here is much gentler, I think.

Women, as flowers, make a brief appearance. Do women ever appear in Melville other than as a scented suggestion? Presumably the reference to musk and Salem is a glance back at Hawthorne and sexual danger?


Good thought Chris. I'm going to keep a look out for the women factor in my further reading.

Robert, a quick thank you for your excellent guidance and comments.



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