Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sun Oct 26, 2014 12:53 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 251 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 17  Next
Poem on your mind 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

 Poem on your mind
I may have to undertake the task of reading all of Emily Dickinson's poetry. I am constantly amazed at coming across another new to me ED poem. Here is the one I stumbled upon today.

I've known a Heaven like a tent
To wrap its shining yards,
Pluck up its stakes and disappear
Without the sound of boards
Or rip of nail, or carpenter,
But just the miles of stare
That signalize a show's retreat
In North America.
No trace, no figment of the thing
That dazzled yesterday,
No ring, no marvel;
Men and feats
Dissolved as utterly
As birds' far navigation
Discloses just a hue;
A plash of oars -a gaiety,
Then swallowed up to view.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


The following user would like to thank Saffron for this post:
day_dream, DWill
Sun Apr 24, 2011 7:20 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
Well, she could make a good poem from just about anything, even the sight of a revivalist meeting pulling up stakes.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Sun Apr 24, 2011 7:57 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
DWill wrote:
Well, she could make a good poem from just about anything, even the sight of a revivalist meeting pulling up stakes.

Gee, I was thinking circus, but I'll bet you are right.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:34 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
I've been listening to Shakespeare sonnets read by a wide variety of people on Prairie Home Companion as I've been in my garden. Nice day, huh?

SONNET 43
When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see,
For all the day they view things unrespected;
But when I sleep, in dreams they look on thee,
And darkly bright are bright in dark directed.
Then thou, whose shadow shadows doth make bright,
How would thy shadow's form form happy show
To the clear day with thy much clearer light,
When to unseeing eyes thy shade shines so!
How would, I say, mine eyes be blessed made
By looking on thee in the living day,
When in dead night thy fair imperfect shade
Through heavy sleep on sightless eyes doth stay!
All days are nights to see till I see thee,
And nights bright days when dreams do show thee me.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Sun Apr 24, 2011 12:01 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
Saffron wrote:
DWill wrote:
Well, she could make a good poem from just about anything, even the sight of a revivalist meeting pulling up stakes.

Gee, I was thinking circus, but I'll bet you are right.

No.,looking again. I think you had it right.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Sun Apr 24, 2011 5:34 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
I mentioned I was going through Shakespeare's sonnets again. I never realized that No. 18, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day," was written to a man, as a good many of the sonnets are. I had assumed this one was about a woman. The only clue to the gender, though, is the context of the poem. The poem occurs in a section of the sequence in which there is no doubt that the poet is addressing a man.

Shall I compare thee to a Summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And Summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And oft' is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd:
But thy eternal Summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wanderest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Sat Apr 30, 2011 7:32 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
DWill wrote:
I mentioned I was going through Shakespeare's sonnets again. I never realized that No. 18, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day," was written to a man, as a good many of the sonnets are. I had assumed this one was about a woman. The only clue to the gender, though, is the context of the poem. The poem occurs in a section of the sequence in which there is no doubt that the poet is addressing a man.

I've been meaning to come back to this post since I first read it a few weeks ago. I am so curious about what lead you to believe it was written for a man? What evidence is there in the other poems in the sequence?

Now, here is the poem that has been on my mind.

The Book of the Dead Man (Food)
by Marvin Bell

Live as if you were already dead.
Zen admonition

1. About the Dead Man and Food

The dead man likes chocolate, dark chocolate.
The dead man remembers custard as it was, spumoni as it was, shave
ice as it was.
The dead man talks food with an active tongue, licks his fingers, takes
seconds, but has moved on to salads.
It's the cheese, it's the crunch of the crunchy, it's the vinegar in the oil
that makes a salad more than grass.
The dead man has a grassy disposition but no cow stomach for flappy
leaves and diced croutons.
The dead man remembers oysterettes as they were.
He recalls good water and metal-free fish.
Headlights from the dock drew in blue claw crabs by the bucketful.
A flashlight showed them where the net lay.
If they looked bigger in the water than in the pail, they grew back on the
stove.
It was like that, before salads.
The dead man, at the age he is, has redefined mealtime.
It being the quantum fact that the dead man does not believe in time, but
in mealtime.

2. More About the Dead Man and Food

The dead man's happiness may seem unseemly.
By land or by sea, aloft or alit, happiness befalls us.
Were mankind less transfixed by its own importance, it would be harder
to be happy.
Were the poets less obsessed with the illusion of the self, it would be
more difficult to sing.
It would be crisscross, it would be askew, it would be zigzag, it would be
awry, it would be cockeyed in any context of thought.
The dead man has felt the sensation of living.
He has felt the orgasmic, the restful, the ambiguous, the nearly-falling-over,
the equilibrium, the lightning-in-the-bottle and the bottle in shards.
You cannot make the dead man write what you want.
The dead man offers quick approval but seeks none in return.
Chocolate is the more existential, it has the requisite absurdity, it loosens
the gland.
The dead man must choose what he ingests, it cannot be anything goes
in the world the world made.
So we come back to chocolate, which frees the dead man's tongue.
The dead man is every emotion at once, every heartbreak, every falling-
down laugh riot, every fishhook that caught a finger.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Tue May 10, 2011 5:11 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Likes the book better than the movie

Gold Contributor

Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 826
Location: Germany
Thanks: 201
Thanked: 179 times in 139 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Germany (de)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
Troublesome and intriguing. But Bell rather sums up the essence, doesn't he? Death or life. Interesting take on death, being that once you are dead, you don't change. Change was and is for the living. The dead man makes no more mistakes; there is observation, rumination, every "emotion at once". He seems to be taking , as one would logically think, a passive, uh, well, stance. But here he is "choosing". He MUST choose. This is what intrigues me most about Bell's hero here (other than the fact we are talking about a dead man). Why must he choose?
Darn. This is going to be one to chew on for quite a while.


_________________
Gods and spirits are parasitic--Pascal Boyer

Religion is the only force in the world that lets a person have his prejudice or hatred and feel good about it --S C Hitchcock

Believe those who are seeking the truth. Doubt those who find it. --André Gide

Reading is a majority skill but a minority art. --Julian Barnes


The following user would like to thank oblivion for this post:
Saffron
Tue May 10, 2011 6:33 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4949
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1084
Thanked: 1048 times in 818 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
Saffron wrote:
DWill wrote:
I mentioned I was going through Shakespeare's sonnets again. I never realized that No. 18, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day," was written to a man, as a good many of the sonnets are. I had assumed this one was about a woman. The only clue to the gender, though, is the context of the poem. The poem occurs in a section of the sequence in which there is no doubt that the poet is addressing a man.

I've been meaning to come back to this post since I first read it a few weeks ago. I am so curious about what lead you to believe it was written for a man? What evidence is there in the other poems in the sequence?

Now, here is the poem that has been on my mind.

It's the context of the sonnet within the group of sonnets where the poet is clearly talking about a man. The book begins with the poet sayijng many times, "Get you some children or you'll leave nothing of yourself behind," and then transitions to more general praise of this man whom the poet admires, and indeed loves. But it does not appear to be homosexual love, rather the love between males that apparently was more acceptable then. Out of context, there is of course no reason not to consider the person addressed as a female.

I have a poem on my mind, too. I was looking up this morning at some swifts (well, okay, they might have been swallows) dipping and turning, and thought of the Robert Graves lyric. It is very Frostian, I think.

Flying Crooked


The butterfly, the cabbage white,
(His honest idiocy of flight)
Will never now, it is too late,
Master the art of flying straight,
Yet has — who knows so well as I? —
A just sense of how not to fly:
He lurches here and here by guess
And God and hope and hopelessness.
Even the aerobatic swift
Has not his flying-crooked gift.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


The following user would like to thank DWill for this post:
Saffron
Tue May 10, 2011 8:50 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Thread Flintstone

Platinum Contributor

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 887
Thanks: 122
Thanked: 191 times in 155 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Poem on your mind
Thanks for this Dwill, great poem.



Tue May 10, 2011 12:12 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
giselle wrote:
Thanks for this Dwill, great poem.


Very nice.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Wed May 11, 2011 8:28 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
I recieve a poem a day in my email from Poets.org. Many of them I can't make heads or tails of and just when I think I will discontinue the poems a good one comes along. Here is todays good one -


Man in Stream
by Rosanna Warren

You stand in the brook, mud smearing
your forearms, a bloodied mosquito on your brow,
your yellow T-shirt dampened to your chest
as the current flees between your legs,
amber, verdigris, unraveling
today's story, last night's travail . . .

You stare at the father beaver, eye to eye,
but he outstares you—you who trespass in his world,
who have, however unwilling, yanked out his fort,
stick by tooth-gnarled, mud-clabbered stick,
though you whistle vespers to the wood thrush
and trace flame-flicker in the grain of yellow birch.

Death outpaces us. Upended roots
of fallen trees still cling to moss-furred granite.
Lichen smolders on wood-rot, fungus trails in wisps.
I wanted a day with cracks, to let the godlight in.
The forest is always a nocturne, but it gleams,
the birch tree tosses its change from palm to palm,

and we who unmake are ourselves unmade
if we know, if only we know
how to give ourselves in this untendered light.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Thu May 12, 2011 2:05 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Better Thread Count than Your Best Linens

Silver Contributor

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 626
Thanks: 42
Thanked: 72 times in 56 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Poem on your mind
This is really good. One you want to read over and over again.



Thu May 12, 2011 3:35 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pop up Book Fanatic


Joined: May 2011
Posts: 14
Thanks: 8
Thanked: 3 times in 2 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
I've had a poem stuck in my head for the last 2 weeks, a friend sent to to me on an email and every time I get a quiet moment it pops back into my head.

The Alter
by Charles Simic

The plastic statue of the Virgin
On top of a bedroom dresser
With a blackened mirror
From a bad-dream grooming salon.
Two pebbles from the grave of a rock star,
A small, grinning windup monkey,
A bronze Egyptian coin
And a red movie-ticket stub.

A splotch of sunlight on the framed
Communion photograph of a boy
With the eyes of someone
Who will drown in a lake real soon.

An altar dignifying the god of chance.
What is beautiful, it cautions,
Is found accidentally and not sought after.
What is beautiful is easily lost.


_________________
When people walk away from you, let them go. Your destiny is never tied to anyone who leaves you, and it doesn't mean they are bad people. It just means that their part in your story is over. - Tony McCollum


The following user would like to thank AndiSGraham for this post:
froglipz, Saffron
Tue May 31, 2011 4:17 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2858
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 422
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Poem on your mind
AndiSGraham wrote:
I've had a poem stuck in my head for the last 2 weeks, a friend sent to to me on an email and every time I get a quiet moment it pops back into my head.

The Alter
by Charles Simic


Thanks for posting.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


The following user would like to thank Saffron for this post:
AndiSGraham
Tue May 31, 2011 5:08 am
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 251 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 17  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books

Books by New Authors



Booktalk.org on Facebook 



BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
Sense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

cron
Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2014. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank