Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Fri Dec 19, 2014 11:29 am

<< Week of December 19, 2014 >>
Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
19 Day Month

20 Day Month

21 Day Month

22 Day Month

23 Day Month

24 Day Month

25 Day Month




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4314
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1203
Thanked: 1256 times in 945 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
If I may begin with a mildly extended throat clearing, here is the tale of how I am acquiring a copy of The Brothers Karamazov, followed by some suggestions on how to approach the book.

One of my cars is rather old, and its radiator burst, partly my fault and also partly the carelessness of my son Alex who is nineteen. Driving a car whose radiator hisses like a dragon and has to be placated with water every ten miles or so to prevent nuclear meltdown is not fun. My mechanic told me I should buy a second hand radiator. After several phone calls I located one in Queanbeyan at a wrecker’s yard, about a thirty mile drive from my house, and conveniently close to some bookshops where I hoped to acquire a bargain copy of The Brothers Karamazov.

On the morning of the radiator adventure, I went off to pick up a copy of the Brothers K from said secondhand bookshop in Fyshwick. I also wanted a copy of The Trial by Franz Kafka for my sixteen year old daughter Diana, who told me she wanted to read it (just for fun I assume). I had Der Prozess, but that wasn’t good enough for us monoglots. I went to three bookshops all in the same group of shops. None of them had The Trial, and only one had Brothers K, but in a four point edition. After struggling with a fine print edition of Paradise Lost, I had no wish to repeat the experience. My efforts had failed. I picked up a copy of Budge’s Egyptian Religion, some short stories by Kipling, Nietzsche’s Twilight of the Idols, a book by Jonathan Franzen who my wife Caroline quite likes, Israel Finkelstein on Biblical Archaeology, and a couple of other remainder bargains.

So then to the wrecker’s yard. Australia is a very white country, with big Asian and Arab communities but not many Africans, so I was surprised that the yard owner was a recent black immigrant from Africa. He unbolted and unsawed a radiator from an old wrecked car, and then asked me if I would pay extra for the fans or if he should take them off. He said fifty dollars for the fans. I offered twenty, which he agreed. I said leave the fans on. So to payment. I asked him if he took credit card. No. Sadly, I was a few dollars short of cash. I went to an ATM, but my card was not working, even after a phone call to the bank. It was a Sunday so nothing was open. Strike one Bros K, Strike two Kafka, Strike three, radiator. A bad day. So I drove home without the radiator. I got some cash and went back for it, and for some bonnet struts. I told the wrecker I should have bargained him down on price for the struts, to which he just gave a booming laugh. With petrol and time cost, I probably should have just got a new radiator, but at least I got Budge and Finkelstein, if not Dostoevski. My son half-offered to install the radiator, but I will get the mechanic to do it, for fear of getting a half installation.

On Monday I went to the library. They did not have Bros K on the shelf, but I managed to order it by inter library loan, for collection next Monday. The librarian assured me it was not available, but I pointed out to him that he did not know how to spell Dostoyevsky, which has multiple translations, so that hurdle was overcome when he searched on Karamazov.

I also picked up an excellent book at the library which I have just read while sitting on the plane to San Francisco. It is called Dostoevsky in Ninety Minutes, by Paul Strathern. I also borrowed Fyodor Dostoevsky his Life and Work by Stanley Baldwin, which contains a seventy page précis of The Brothers Karamazov.

Baldwin gives some quotes which show why Bros K is among the very greatest novels. Dostoevsky himself is quoted as follows: “The whole idea of the work is to affirm the idea of universal disorder, to show that this disorder is all over the place, in society, in its affairs, in its governing principles… and in the decay of the idea of family. If passionate convictions still exist, then they are destructive ones (socialism). Moral ideas no longer exist, suddenly not a single one remains.” This rather bleak assessment of modern life may be specific to the Russia of his time, or perhaps it has wider implications. Another quote, from Joseph Frank, compares the book to King Lear.

Here is a nice comment from Strathern: “Dostoevsky’s great novels burst upon the European literary scene like a succession of thunderbolts. Over the next decades their raw psychology and passionate involvement had a galvanizing effect upon writers as disparate as Nietzsche and Kafka. The study of human psychology was entering a new phase, and Dostoevsky’s understanding of the darker and more extreme recesses of the human mind cast a light into areas that had seldom been illuminated with such force since the ancient Greek tragedies and Shakespeare.” (p99)

The four * main characters are the dissolute father Fyodor and his three sons, who each represent a main current in Russian life – Fyodor is Russia itself, Ivan is reason, Alyosha is faith, and Dmitri is emotion. The balance between these themes provides much of the creative drama of the book.

Reading the Strathern book makes me think we will be better off using thematic threads for Bros K rather than chapter threads. I see Chris has made chapter threads, which is great, and if people have thoughts that pertain to a particular chapter they should use those threads, but it may be possible that thematic threads can pick up ideas from the book that cross across multiple chapters.

I will soon set up threads as follows unless anyone complains.

• Brothers Karamazov as family portrait

• Who killed Fyodor Karamazov?

• Emotion, faith and reason in The Brothers Karamazov

• Existentialism in The Brothers Karamazov – condemned to freedom?

• The Grand Inquisitor - Atheism and morality in The Brothers Karamazov

Here is the full text of The Grand Inquisitor. It is the most famous passage in the book. If people read just this it will be worthwhile.

Strathern comments that Dostoevsky is most suitable for people aged around 18 to 21 who are experiencing existential doubt, and who can readily relate to the deep arguments and insights into human experience, before they are frozen into cynicism by adulthood. He says “Such literature is best appreciated in that state of bewildering emotional and philosophical intensity most frequently encountered in late teenage years… Readers may find themselves transported into a realm where passionate moral forces combine to enact a drama of desolate grandeur.’ The flight attendant saw me reading this and said ‘serious’.

Dostoevsky is really the greatest Russian novelist. He was amazingly prescient about the political currents that would lead to the Bolshevik Revolution. His early experience of being sent for years to Siberia as a political prisoner after a mock execution, and his youth in Petersburg where his father’s surgery catered to a poor neighbourhood, contributed to his depth of insight into the human condition. The debates in The Brothers Karamazov get to the heart of what it means to be human. These questions should have universal appeal. There is also a whodunit mystery, and a general portrait of Russian life in the small village of Skotoprigonyevsk (pen of beasts).

* ETA - sorry forgot the smelly bastard brother Smerdyakov



Last edited by Robert Tulip on Tue Feb 22, 2011 11:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.



Tue Feb 22, 2011 9:03 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4990
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1101
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
Robert, it's not schadenfreude, but I enjoyed reading about your tribulations automotive and literary. I picture you as much more theoretically concerned in daily life, so it was good to see you mucking around just as I do over here. I'd also like to say, although I don't know that I'll be re-reading this book along with you, that it's a great idea to set up thematic threads rather than the usual way of chapter sequence. I hope you enjoy San Francisco.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Tue Feb 22, 2011 10:52 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Master of Books

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 1465
Thanks: 147
Thanked: 587 times in 437 posts
Gender: Male

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
I probably won't re-read the book right now, but I may read The Grand Inquisitor again.



Wed Feb 23, 2011 3:38 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Holy Smokes I'm Great

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 1614
Location: Hampton, Ga
Thanks: 240
Thanked: 305 times in 232 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
Looking up: Monoglot.....busy....please wait....Knowledge Achieved.

Thanks for leading the discussion. I have a feeling I'll be getting a lot more out of the book.


"The whole idea of the work is to affirm the idea of universal disorder, to show that this disorder is all over the place, in society, in its affairs, in its governing principles… and in the decay of the idea of family."

That's what comes with real freedom, I guess. Humans are not robots and who is to say someone is a bad person if they don't hurt anyone but fail to conform to some kind of prescribed etiquette or social norm. I've noticed how touchy and self conscious the characters are... it seems typical in Russian literature. Also what seems typical is the love hate relationship of Russians for fellow Russians as well as Russians for Europeans; which they clearly separate themselves from but also admit to stealing culture from. When they do steal - and I use that word because it's just like that. It isn't "borrow" or "share" in any friendly term. They take these pieces of what they consider a higher culture and instead of it helping the country to grow or expand its horizons - they praise it to kingdom come and then condemn it. If it isn't Russian it's better and it's treason and therefore worthy of contempt - it's always extreme. It's very bipolar. There's a lot of sensitive personalities in Russian literature because everyone seems to be trying to lord over everyone else and trying not to get lorded over.

I don't know much about Russian history but it seems socialism was something very much a topic of discussion before it ever became an (un)reality. Russia was probably one of the last white cultures to have serfs and it's always been treated rather harshly by Europe. No one, it seems, has been harder on Russians than Russians, though. How can you love others if you don't love yourself... and not in an insane Bipolar way... just a calm and forgiving affection.

Alyosha is a borderline unbelievable character in my opinion - and Ivan borders on also being unbelievable. The peculiarities of people, their faults, make them real and closer to the reader. The real characters are the ones I like - not the fake ones. Real characters make a real connection with me and are vital in a tragedy. I've never known an Alyosha and I most likely never will. I don't even want to. As for an Ivan, he's only unbelievable because he hasn't really been opened up to me so far. He's just a name on a page.



Wed Feb 23, 2011 4:06 pm
Profile Email YIM
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pulitzer Prize Finalist


Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 480
Location: Texas
Thanks: 39
Thanked: 98 times in 83 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
I have it! I'm going to read it! More later!


_________________
The question is not, Can they reason? nor, Can they talk? but, Can they suffer? - Jeremy Bentham


Thu Feb 24, 2011 3:04 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pulitzer Prize Finalist


Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 480
Location: Texas
Thanks: 39
Thanked: 98 times in 83 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
I have finished the chapter introduing the second brother and am now getting to the runt of the litter. Wow! There are some authors that just speak to you... and D. is among those that do it for me. It's all believable to me (though that's not to say it has to be believable to all)... anyway, the act of reading a work of fiction requires something of the reader - unbelievability, or insanity. Wow! oops I said that already... sorry. I'm a fanboy here. I'll soon put it together and look at it with a more critical eye.


_________________
The question is not, Can they reason? nor, Can they talk? but, Can they suffer? - Jeremy Bentham


The following user would like to thank Kevin for this post:
Robert Tulip
Sun Mar 06, 2011 6:56 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4314
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1203
Thanked: 1256 times in 945 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
Kevin wrote:
Wow! There are some authors that just speak to you... and D. is among those that do it for me.


Same here. Dostoyevsky is renowned as the greatest Russian novelist, equal to Tolstoy. He writes very clearly, beautifully and simply, making the plot easy to follow and the characterisation vivid. The book is hilarious at times, for example when the buffoon Fyodor tells the priests what he really thinks of them. There is also an extraordinary depth of perception. Dostoyevsky deftly uses his palette of words to paint portraits of the imagination. And the amazing cunning of composition of the whodunnit around Fyodor's tragic and gloomy death...

Other threads so far...

brothers-karamazov-as-parable-for-russia-t10354.html

who-killed-fyodor-karamazov-t10364.html

brothers-karamazov-the-grand-inquisitor-t10324.html

bros-karamazov-online-t10277.html



Tue Mar 08, 2011 2:26 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pulitzer Prize Finalist


Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 480
Location: Texas
Thanks: 39
Thanked: 98 times in 83 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
I am only at Book 2 Chapter 6 Why is such a Man Alive? But I'd like to mention what is actually my thought regarding the book. I like religion when it has heart. It doesn't matter that I don't believe in it. I'm thinking now of Father Zosima when he tells the mother of the slain infant that she shouldn't be reconciled to the loss. I can't explain it, and that's the heart of religion, at least as far as this evangelical agnostic can see it.


_________________
The question is not, Can they reason? nor, Can they talk? but, Can they suffer? - Jeremy Bentham


Sun Mar 13, 2011 8:12 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Holy Smokes I'm Great

Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 1614
Location: Hampton, Ga
Thanks: 240
Thanked: 305 times in 232 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
All the ground kissing and the forgiving of everyone and everything for anything and.... geez give it a f*cking rest. Prostrate yourself on the ground and while crying you can't help kissing the earth over and over and over aaawww boohoo hooo for every sin ever... I loved the book before Zosimo started dying. Now it's a real chore to read.



Sun Mar 13, 2011 8:56 pm
Profile Email YIM
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4314
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1203
Thanked: 1256 times in 945 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
President Camacho wrote:
All the ground kissing and the forgiving of everyone and everything for anything and.... geez give it a f*cking rest. Prostrate yourself on the ground and while crying you can't help kissing the earth over and over and over aaawww boohoo hooo for every sin ever... I loved the book before Zosimo started dying. Now it's a real chore to read.
Dostoyevsky is slightly mean at times. Crime and Punishment was written for a monthly serial, where he deliberately ended each chapter with an enticement to find out what would happen next. Brothers Karamazov is similar in having simultaneous parallel plots. Some focus on drama, others on ideas.

Book five ends with Ivan and Smerdy arguing, Smerdy explains he expects to have a fit, and gives Ivan the father Fyodor's secret knock, explaining that he has also given it to Dmitri, who threatened to kill both him and Fyodor. Then old Fyodor is pacing around his room like a horny goat waiting for his young hussy Grushka, who he thinks is the only one other than Smerdy who knows the knock. So the suspense is high.

And then, Book 6. Alyosha returns to his dying monk Zossimo, who tells his life story. Zossimo mentions that many people jeer and mock at monks. Some here may be guilty of that, but actually his story is amazing. Zossimo almost died in a duel when he challenged the fiance of his beloved. He tells a further story, how another man confessed to him that he murdered his beloved with a knife to the heart as she slept, but covered his tracks so expertly that a serf was charged, and when guilt overcame him years later no one would believe the truth. Zossimo also tells some beautiful pantheist poetry that is worth discussing further. I can tell that some readers may find this monk stuff less gripping than the high Karamazov drama, although it has a real depth of ideas, including the prophecy that when the peasants stop drowning themselves in alcohol they will drown themselves in blood.

Meanwhile the father paces back and forth in his room, waiting for the secret knock...



Last edited by Robert Tulip on Mon Mar 14, 2011 4:59 am, edited 1 time in total.



Mon Mar 14, 2011 4:56 am
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Official Newbie!


Joined: May 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Bristol, TN
Thanks: 1
Thanked: 2 times in 2 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
I went back and re-read the first third of the book, looking for the connection between characters and Russian society. I'm have problems seeing this aspect of the book. The characaters are very diverse and Alyosha is almost unbelievable as the "saint" character.


_________________
Terry


Tue Mar 15, 2011 12:38 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pop up Book Fanatic

Silver Contributor

Joined: Mar 2011
Posts: 14
Thanks: 24
Thanked: 8 times in 7 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
I just purchased, The Brothers Karamazov today, I am going to attempt to catch up. I think it is wonderful the discussion will be during the months of Match, April and May. Makes me feel as if I haven't come too late if I sacrifice some time to catching up. Thanks for the interesting perspective from Strathern and the link.


_________________
Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge. - Charles Darwin


Sat Mar 19, 2011 4:49 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4314
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1203
Thanked: 1256 times in 945 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
LadySera wrote:
I went back and re-read the first third of the book, looking for the connection between characters and Russian society. I'm have problems seeing this aspect of the book. The characaters are very diverse and Alyosha is almost unbelievable as the "saint" character.


Hi, I've commented on this in the thread brothers-karamazov-as-parable-for-russia-t10354.html

I think it is true that all the characters are stereotypes. Dostoyevsky, to my reading, has a strong didactic intent, that he wants to portray the competing qualities within the Russian soul, the forces that are tearing the country apart. These include irrational passion and wanton sensuality, the degradation of nihilism, spiritual fervour and fanaticism, treating people like shit, pompous stuck up bitchiness, alcoholism, profligacy, trickery, envy, belief that reason can replace faith, among other themes. All of these contribute in some way to the murder of Fyodor Karamazov, and to the sense that he somehow deserved to die.

Alyosha is specifically described in Dostoyevsky's introduction as the hero of the book. So he is not really meant to be any more or less realistic than say Jesus Christ, considering it is a work of fiction. But I think Alyosha has a depth of personality that is still believable.



Sat Mar 19, 2011 6:48 pm
Profile Email WWW
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Pulitzer Prize Finalist


Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 480
Location: Texas
Thanks: 39
Thanked: 98 times in 83 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: First Thoughts on the Brothers Karamazov
President Camacho wrote:
I loved the book before Zosimo started dying. Now it's a real chore to read.
You picked the exact moment the book really picks up! I found it rather slow to that point but riveting since... are you still reading it?


_________________
The question is not, Can they reason? nor, Can they talk? but, Can they suffer? - Jeremy Bentham


Sat Apr 02, 2011 6:27 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books

Poll

Yes  83%  [5]
No  16%  [1]
Total votes: 6

Books by New Authors

Visual Help for Getting Started


Top Posters

Of all time: Chris OConnor (14265), Interbane (5667), DWill (4990), stahrwe (4610), Robert Tulip (4314), Mr. Pessimistic (3542), johnson1010 (3343), geo (3309), ant (3159), Penelope (2971), Saffron (2859), Suzanne (2503), Frank 013 (2021), Dissident Heart (1796), bleachededen (1680), President Camacho (1614), Ophelia (1543), Dexter (1465), youkrst (1386), tat tvam asi (1298)

Of the last 24 hrs: youkrst (3), DWill (2), Taylor (2), Flann 5 (2), Robert Tulip (2), war1 (1), danimorg62 (1), johnson1010 (1), 2estiychin (1), Cattleman (1), LanDroid (1), Gnostic Bishop (1), Chris OConnor (1), Crystalline (1)




BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
King Henry IV, Part 1 - by William ShakespeareAtheist Mind, Humanist Heart - by Lex Bayer and John FigdorSense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2014. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank