Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME ENTER FORUMS OUR BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Fri Sep 30, 2016 5:01 am

<< Week of September 30, 2016 >>
Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
30 Day Month

1 Day Month

2 Day Month

3 Day Month

4 Day Month

5 Day Month

6 Day Month





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 
Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain 
Author Message
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Bronze Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 298
Location: Toronto, ON
Thanks: 4
Thanked: 24 times in 19 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Canada (ca)

Post Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
Haruki Murakami

Chapter 8,
An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain / Creta Kano's Long Story


_________________
"Beware those who are always reading books" - The Genius of the Crowd, by Charles Bukowski


Sat Jun 05, 2010 12:10 pm
Profile Email ICQ YIM
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Sophomore


Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 261
Location: Wheaton, Illinois, USA
Thanks: 26
Thanked: 34 times in 31 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
"As the body develops, the volume of pain increases proportionately."
If pain = unhappiness this is a good metaphor for what happens as a child becomes an adolescent.

"I endured the pain, I didn't complain to anyone. I strove to keep on smiling, I disciplined myself always to present an exterior of calm when the pain was so intense that I could hardly go on standing. Crying and complaining could not relieve the pain, it could only make me more miserable than ever. As a result of my efforts people loved me. They saw me as a quiet good-natured girl." The metaphor can be continued, people (adults) don't want to be bothered with the pain of adolescence. But, there is something else going on now.

"... people loved me" because of the facade I put on, because I was not a burden. So the statement becomes more universal--not just about adolescence but about how/why people love in general.

"I might have had a perfect life if it hadn't been for the pain. But is was always there. It was like any shadow. If I forgot about it for one instance, the pain would attack another part of my body." First, irony here--If my life had been perfect (painless), my life would have been perfect. But, again, something else--she is always reminded that her (everyone's) life is not perfect.

This is like reading poetry, stuff happening on several levels.


_________________
--Gary

"Freedom is feeling easy in your harness" --Robert Frost


Sat Jun 12, 2010 11:29 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Bronze Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 298
Location: Toronto, ON
Thanks: 4
Thanked: 24 times in 19 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Canada (ca)

Post Re: Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
I have a bad habit of taking things at face value, so I never even considered this comparison. I can definitely see the similarities to adolescence... I think part of being a teen is having all this angst and being told by society that your feelings are irrelevant and no one wants to hear about it. As one matures, I think most people learn to not share their deeper emotions, constructing that facade Creta refers to.


_________________
"Beware those who are always reading books" - The Genius of the Crowd, by Charles Bukowski


Tue Jun 15, 2010 1:48 pm
Profile Email ICQ YIM
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Sophomore


Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 261
Location: Wheaton, Illinois, USA
Thanks: 26
Thanked: 34 times in 31 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
Theomanic wrote:
I have a bad habit of taking things at face value, so I never even considered this comparison. I can definitely see the similarities to adolescence... I think part of being a teen is having all this angst and being told by society that your feelings are irrelevant and no one wants to hear about it. As one matures, I think most people learn to not share their deeper emotions, constructing that facade Creta refers to.


There is a lot in this book that works best if it is taken litteraly. I think the ending reinforces that. It definitly is not moderism where you must look for the metaphor behind almost every word. Of course, I could be very wrong. I have only read the book once and there is a lot to digest.


_________________
--Gary

"Freedom is feeling easy in your harness" --Robert Frost


Tue Jun 15, 2010 3:36 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
Theomanic wrote:
I have a bad habit of taking things at face value, so I never even considered this comparison. I can definitely see the similarities to adolescence... I think part of being a teen is having all this angst and being told by society that your feelings are irrelevant and no one wants to hear about it. As one matures, I think most people learn to not share their deeper emotions, constructing that facade Creta refers to.


Oh, well said - as a teen, I found that too - that nobody really wants to hear about pain, either physical or emotional.

My father always put down any references I made to feelings. My mother always assumed that 'cause she was a grownup, she knew everything so had nothing to learn.

She never really thought about how people really felt. Talked about people a lot, the things they did, the things they said - what she thought was right and wrong. But never really got into the person's feelings about it all.

When my father went through heart surgery, he had an awful time. His chest collapsed on the operating table, his stitches broke in intensive care. Through the whole thing she was worried, if course, but what was coming out of her mostly was her own feelings.

'Oh, this is so hard on me, you know', she would tell people.



Wed Aug 11, 2010 9:08 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Bronze Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 298
Location: Toronto, ON
Thanks: 4
Thanked: 24 times in 19 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Canada (ca)

Post Re: Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
I think a lack of empathy is at the core of many problems in the world. Definitely in this book, Toru is learning to consider things from other peoples point of view. Especially Kumiko's.


_________________
"Beware those who are always reading books" - The Genius of the Crowd, by Charles Bukowski


Wed Aug 11, 2010 9:22 am
Profile Email ICQ YIM
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Genius


Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 761
Thanks: 3
Thanked: 13 times in 12 posts
Gender: None specified

Post Re: Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
In what way? In his role as a 'housewife'? I don't really see him gaining any insight into the way she really feels. Unless this comes in further on in the book.

I'm at the part where Gooshie is trying to get him to set up computer communication so he can talk to her.



Thu Aug 12, 2010 12:53 am
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Agrees that Reading is Fundamental

Bronze Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 298
Location: Toronto, ON
Thanks: 4
Thanked: 24 times in 19 posts
Gender: Female
Country: Canada (ca)

Post Re: Ch. 8 - An Inquiry into the Nature of Pain
Not in his role as a housewife - Kumiko was never that. But in that he has been put in a situation where he must learn to understand how others feel if he wants to resolve it.


_________________
"Beware those who are always reading books" - The Genius of the Crowd, by Charles Bukowski


Thu Aug 12, 2010 9:17 am
Profile Email ICQ YIM
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average. 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

BookTalk.org Newsletter 

Announcements 

• Resources related to Uncle Tom's Cabin
Mon Sep 19, 2016 10:28 pm



Site Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
IDEAS FOR WHAT TO READ:
Bestsellers
Book Awards
• Book Reviews
• Online Books
• Team Picks
Newspaper Book Sections

WHERE TO BUY BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

BEHIND THE BOOKS:
• Great resource pages are coming!

Featured Books

Books by New Authors


*

FACTS is a select group of active BookTalk.org members passionate about promoting Freethought, Atheism, Critical Thinking and Science.

Apply to join FACTS
See who else is in FACTS







BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.



Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2016. All rights reserved.
Display Pagerank