Online reading group and book discussion forum
  HOME FORUMS BOOKS LINKS DONATE ADVERTISE CONTACT  
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Mon Dec 22, 2014 4:21 pm

<< Week of December 22, 2014 >>
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
22 Day Month

23 Day Month

24 Day Month

25 Day Month

26 Day Month

27 Day Month

28 Day Month





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Book Burning in Don Quixote 
Author Message
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Book Burning in Don Quixote
Don Quixote's madness is caused by reading too many books of chivalry, so when his housekeeper and neice find out, they call the Priest and a local doctor to decide what to do about their master/uncle's madness. The Priest suggests that they go through Don Quixote's library and burn the books that have possibly caused the most damage, and which are likely to cause further damage if Don Quixote were to read them again.

Even though it is the priest who suggests that the books be burned, there are several that he saves, either for himself or for the doctor to keep locked away for posterity. It didn't surprise me that the priest would suggest burning the books, as church figures have been burning "harmful" or "evil" books for centuries, both before and after Cervantes' time, and as books showed to be the cause of Don Quixote's madness, it made sense that the priest would burn the evil influence. What did surprise me, however, was that he saved some of the books, even lamenting the fact that he almost destroyed them. This amused me, to hear him praise a book of chivalry or an antique, even though it was he who suggested the books be destroyed. Even though he is a man of the church, he does not seem to be as hostile as other clergy might have been in such a situation.

Of course in the story, the differences the priest sees from book to book make sense, but to me, a reader centuries removed and without knowledge of the chivalric tales owned by Don Quixote, I saw no difference between what the priest exclaimed to be exquisite writing and what he gave to the housekeeper to burn. I would be curious to know what other people think about this part of the book, because the irony of a bookburning inside a book about a man who has gone insane from books is not understated and definitely makes its mark.

So what are everyone else's thoughts?



Wed Mar 31, 2010 1:27 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Kindle Fanatic


Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 539
Location: Arkham Asylum
Thanks: 33
Thanked: 55 times in 44 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
The scene reminds me of "Peony in Love," in which there's a scene where a local doctor burns the main character's books and writings because she is starving herself with lovesickness. I guess the author may have been influenced by Don Quixote. :lol:


The priest in "Don Quixote" does seem to have noble intentions, but I don't really know if burning them was absolutely necessary, or even the right thing to do.


_________________
Big bright accent, catty smile
Oscar Wilde confrontation
Ah, live like it's the style.

Shelfari!


Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:37 pm
Profile Email YIM
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
The church has always been a big supporter of banning/burning "immoral" books, especially in this period of history, so the fact that he condemned them to the fire makes perfect sense to me.

What I was so surprised at was the priest's judgment of the books. When the idea first comes up, the idea seems to be that they will burn all of the books that have anything to do with chivalry, but the priest then "saves" many of them, praising their poetry and the strength of the characters and authors, even though these are also some of the books that drove Don Quixote mad. It's the arbitrary nature of the book burning that surprised and amused me.

And he then let the housekeeper burn the rest of Quixote's library, on her suspicion that without the chivalric texts he will then become mad from the poetry that is left.

It is also amusing to me that, instead of trying to "treat" Quixote's illness and explain to him who he is and what is wrong, they play along with his madness (only strengthening it), by telling him that an enchanter has stolen his library and any memory of the books that were in it. Instead of fearing for his health, or even his soul, as I would have thought a priest would be wont to do (oh God, I'm writing like Cervantes!), they are mocking him, using his illness to keep him hidden from the world and thus trying not to bring shame upon the house. Obviously, this backfires and Quixote leaves unnoticed, but the very idea that they would play along with him in order to keep him from seeing what they had done amazes me, because, in the end, it only undoes what they were trying to accomplish.



Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:51 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor

Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 4322
Location: Canberra
Thanks: 1207
Thanked: 1260 times in 949 posts
Gender: Male
Country: Australia (au)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
The book burning drips with irony. The reader is invited to think, if reading books is this bad, why did Cervantes write such a fat book, so full of literary allusions, and why the hell am I reading it? I'm sure there is a strong political message in this episode, as book burning was associated with the auto-da-fe, the 'act of faith' where the Inquisition burnt heretics at the stake. How I read it was that Cervantes is condemning book burning as the act of idiots, with the vacillation of the priest showing his recognition that his complicity was an immoral piece of cultural vandalism.

See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book-burning



Last edited by Robert Tulip on Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:02 pm
Profile Email WWW
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
Then why does the priest comply with this at all? With everyone else looking to him to find a solution, couldn't he have come up with something else?

That being said, I do understand that Cervantes specifically wrote the priest to behave as such to show the irony and his own recognition that this action is wrong. It is more for the audience, for the satirism, that Cervantes lets the priest act the way he does. I just found it amusing, which I guess was the desired reaction.



Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:08 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4992
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1102
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
I think you're right about Cervantes' purpose being to extend the comedy. On my previous readings of the book, I found little, if any social criticism or irony. Maybe I'll see some this time or somebody will point it out to me. It's always funny to see a character play against his type or the expectations of a situation. So here we have the priest, too, unable to part with some of these same works that have supposedly addled the Don's brain, even though he's suposed to be all about censorship of anything so frivolous. It shows the priest as quite human, too.

Then too, we know the Don is totally looney tunes, but at least there is evidence that he is not alone in his fanaticism. These chivalry books are wildly popular, after all; it's just that nobody else has gotten quite so into them as DQ has.

Also in this scene, we hear the housekeeper lament that the nasty books have ruined the best mind in all of La Mancha. This appears to be not just favoritism toward the master. DQ does have an encyclopedic memory for everything that he has read, and he puts together a whole coherent fantasy world. He is crazy in a way that few people in the real world actually are, with the possible exception of Bipolars in a manic state.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:26 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
DWill wrote:

Also in this scene, we hear the housekeeper lament that the nasty books have ruined the best mind in all of La Mancha. This appears to be not just favoritism toward the master. DQ does have an encyclopedic memory for everything that he has read, and he puts together a whole coherent fantasy world. He is crazy in a way that few people in the real world actually are, with the possible exception of Bipolars in a manic state.


Not to nitpick your assessment, which is fairly accurate, as far as I'm reading it, but I don't think even the most manic of bipolar patients would display the kind of blind fantasy Don Quixote has applied to his world. I think it might be more indicative of a psychotic episode of someone with severe schizophrenia or even dissociative identity disorder (formerly knowns as multiple personality disorder). As someone with bipolar disorder, albeit a mild form, I know that even the manic states of others I have known or read about do not reach this heightened level of reality loss. Bipolar disorder is more a mood disorder than a psychosis, so it seems highly unlikely that anyone with this diagnosis would go this far off the deep end. Don Quixote also has a plan, based on his books, which a manic bipolar patient wouldn't be able to follow, as during manic episodes, patients are prone to do things entirely on impulse, with no rhyme or reason, changing what they do from one moment to the next, and this is clearly not the case with our Knight of the Sorrowful Face (or Knight of the Woeful Countenance, as I have also seen it written).

Sorry for the psychiatric lecture, but I do try to promote awareness for identifying and correctly labeling psychiatric disorders, as I have faced many ill judgments due purely to ignorance of psychiatric disorders and symptoms.



Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:15 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4992
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1102
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
What I was thinking was that, if there could be any relation at all to the Don's craziness and a MI diagnosis, maybe the energy of a manic episode, which in some fuels intense creativity, could be the closest thing. True, delusions don't precisely fit in, but grandiosity does. The problem with suggesting schizophrenia is that I think it's rare for that to invlove such mental prowess as the Don shows, however misdirected it is. I think John Nash, of "A Beautiful Mind" fame, was really exceptional in that regard.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:30 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
Robert Tulip wrote:
The book burning drips with irony. The reader is invited to think, if reading books is this bad, why did Cervantes write such a fat book, so full of literary allusions, and why the hell am I reading it? . . . How I read it was that Cervantes is condemning book burning as the act of idiots, with the vacillation of the priest showing his recognition that his complicity was an immoral piece of cultural vandalism.


These were just my thoughts as I read this the book burning. I had to smile as I read. I imagined Cervantes laughing as he wrote this part of the book.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:46 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
DWill wrote:
What I was thinking was that, if there could be any relation at all to the Don's craziness and a MI diagnosis, maybe the energy of a manic episode, which in some fuels intense creativity, could be the closest thing. True, delusions don't precisely fit in, but grandiosity does. The problem with suggesting schizophrenia is that I think it's rare for that to invlove such mental prowess as the Don shows, however misdirected it is. I think John Nash, of "A Beautiful Mind" fame, was really exceptional in that regard.


That's not always accurate. Schizophrenia can be devastating to the mind, but not always, and since they are prone to delusions, it seems more likely that he was schizophrenic or at least schizoaffective moreso than bipolar. But since it's not something that can be deduced with any accuracy, all we can really do is speculate. He does show attributes of both, as you are right about the grandiosity that can be felt during a manic episode, but he is definitely completely delusional, which is more indicative of schizophrenia. Since he is a fictional character and Cervantes isn't around to question (and wouldn't have known the diagnoses even if he were!), all we can do is watch as his story unfolds, and try not to superimpose 20th century ideas on a fictional 16th century character.

I am, however, unable to grasp how one could be so delusional. Since the book began, he has only had one moment where he admitted that something in reality was actually what it was: the water pounders at the mill, which, the night before, he and Sancho thought was some terrible peril. This is the only time that he concedes to accepting that the mill was what it was, and he is so ashamed of it he refuses to even look at them once he's realized what they were. Other than that, he cannot see how off base he is, even when he sees madness in someone else. It almost seems like the "faithful" Christians who refuse to hear or think anything other than what the Bible or their preachers tell them, and I think this may have been what Robert was saying in the other thread (The Strange Acceptance of Don Quixote's Madness), implying that Don Quixote is ridiculing Christ.



Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:50 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
bleachededen wrote:
Not to nitpick your assessment, which is fairly accurate, as far as I'm reading it, but I don't think even the most manic of bipolar patients would display the kind of blind fantasy Don Quixote has applied to his world. . . .As someone with bipolar disorder, albeit a mild form, I know that even the manic states of others I have known or read about do not reach this heightened level of reality loss. Bipolar disorder is more a mood disorder than a psychosis, so it seems highly unlikely that anyone with this diagnosis would go this far off the deep end.

Acutally, I work with a client who is bipolar and who has become psychotic. I do not think that psychosis is very common during a manic episode, but it does happen. I remember the first time I came across the story of DQ, I thought that he seemed almost as if he were delirious. I remember linking his state of mind to his aged failing body -- these impressions were mine at about age 16, so for give me if I am way off.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:02 pm
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Comandante Literario Supreme w/ Cheese

BookTalk.org Moderator
Silver Contributor

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 2860
Location: Round Hill, VA
Thanks: 424
Thanked: 332 times in 253 posts
Gender: Female
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
bleachededen wrote:
That's not always accurate. Schizophrenia can be devastating to the mind, but not always, and since they are prone to delusions, it seems more likely that he was schizophrenic or at least schizoaffective moreso than bipolar. But since it's not something that can be deduced with any accuracy, all we can really do is speculate. He does show attributes of both, as you are right about the grandiosity that can be felt during a manic episode, but he is definitely completely delusional, which is more indicative of schizophrenia.


We need to remember this is fiction. As for schizophrenia, I work in the field, am very familiar with the DSM-4, and many living breathing schizophrenics. One of the features of schizophrenia is that it intefers with, even reduces a persons cognitive abilities. A person with schizophrenia is often (not always)fairly flat emotionally and shows a strong preference for isolating. This does not sound like our man, DQ.


_________________
"may my mind stroll about hungry and fearless and thirsty and supple"
- e.e. cummings


Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:13 pm
Profile Email
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Finds books under furniture

Silver Contributor

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 1680
Thanks: 178
Thanked: 147 times in 132 posts
Gender: None specified
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
Thank you, Saffron, both for your professional wisdom and your personal insights. I'm only somewhat familiar with the DSM-IV and have only known a few schizophrenics personally, and while I do know my own diagnosis in extreme detail, I don't necessarily know how others with bipolar disorder react to their disorder. I know that I am a rare case, as I have a ridiculous amount of insight into my own inner workings, which, I suppose benefits the psychologists who work with me, but doesn't necessarily allow me to make the changes I know to be beneficial. My illness, like schizophrenia, does interfere with my ability to function on a daily basis because I also have an immense amount of anxiety and OCD. It very rarely impairs my cognitive functions, however, to the contrary, I think one of the most detrimental attribute I have is that I think far too much. I, too, tend to isolate, from a fear of people and judgment and feel uncomfortable in situations that are outside of my general routine.

That may have been too much information, but I just mean to say that I am familiar with mental illness on a personal level and tend to feel empathy for others with similar conditions, but Don Quixote's madness is out of my scope of understanding, and I just wanted to see what others thought, and I thank you and DWill for your input and apologize for any narrow-minded views that I may have put forth here.

Saffron, I do like your 16 year old view of seeing that Quixote's madness came from his aging body. It is quite possible that we are also looking at someone with some sort of dementia, possibly like Alzheimer's but with a more peculiar deterioration. But you are also right to insist that it is impossible to diagnose a fictional character, especially one written at a time when madness was just madness no matter what words we use for it now.



The following user would like to thank bleachededen for this post:
Saffron
Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:51 pm
Profile
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
Sophomore


Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 261
Location: Wheaton, Illinois, USA
Thanks: 26
Thanked: 34 times in 31 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
I think Robert pretty much nailed the analysis of this particular feature of the story. Everything is ironic. SP is writing a "biography" of a man he thinks to be mad. It is fun for the reader to occasionally bring to the front of mind that this is SP's version. Something like remembering, while you are reading it, Boswell, not Johnson, wrote The Life of Samuel Johnson.


_________________
--Gary

"Freedom is feeling easy in your harness" --Robert Frost


Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:21 am
Profile Email
User avatar
Years of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membershipYears of membership
pets endangered by possible book avalanche

Gold Contributor 2

Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 4992
Location: Berryville, Virginia
Thanks: 1102
Thanked: 1074 times in 839 posts
Gender: Male
Country: United States (us)

Post Re: Book Burning in Don Quixote
GaryG48 wrote:
I think Robert pretty much nailed the analysis of this particular feature of the story. Everything is ironic. SP is writing a "biography" of a man he thinks to be mad. It is fun for the reader to occasionally bring to the front of mind that this is SP's version. Something like remembering, while you are reading it, Boswell, not Johnson, wrote The Life of Samuel Johnson.

SP (Sancho Panza) is writing a biography? It's the Arabic historian Cide Hamete Benengeli who is the author of the biography. The narrator appears to be more of a presenter of the manuscript, which he had another guy translate. The narrator first presents a few adventures from one source, it runs out, and he happens to find the rest of the story written on scrolls in Arabic. It's kind of a puzzling narrative device without a clear purpose to me other than to be amusing.

I wonder if we might explore this question of irony a bit. We could start with a short definition from dictionary.com. It isn't all-inclusive but it's a place to start.

The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit.

I don't immediately see irony in DQ, but am interested in getting some specfics from others. I see spoofing of chivalric literature and broad comedy, but nothing mordant or subversive as would be the case with irony. In the narrative format I don't see a distancing of the narrator from the story or a take on the characters that diverges from the characters' take on themselves. Everyone, except DQ and possibly Sancha, knows DQ is looney, but that is hardly subtle. Irony also needs to be a within-the-book thing, not something imported from outside, involving contemporary society, religion, or politics.


_________________
Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance that he himself has spun.

Clifford Geertz


Sat Apr 03, 2010 10:25 pm
Profile Email
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ] • Topic evaluate: Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.Evaluations: 0, 0.00 on the average.  Go to page 1, 2  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:


BookTalk.org Links 
Forum Rules & Tips
Frequently Asked Questions
BBCode Explained
Info for Authors & Publishers
Featured Book Suggestions
Author Interview Transcripts
Be a Book Discussion Leader!
    

Love to talk about books but don't have time for our book discussion forums? For casual book talk join us on Facebook.

Featured Books

Poll

Yes  83%  [5]
No  16%  [1]
Total votes: 6

Books by New Authors

Visual Help for Getting Started


Top Posters

Of all time: Chris OConnor (14267), Interbane (5671), DWill (4992), stahrwe (4610), Robert Tulip (4322), Mr. Pessimistic (3542), johnson1010 (3345), geo (3316), ant (3159), Penelope (2971), Saffron (2860), Suzanne (2505), Frank 013 (2021), Dissident Heart (1796), bleachededen (1680), President Camacho (1614), Ophelia (1543), Dexter (1466), youkrst (1389), tat tvam asi (1298)

Of the last 24 hrs: eevalancaster (2), Interbane (2), Gnostic Bishop (2), Robert Tulip (2), Suzanne (1), Taylor (1), Churchy LaFemme (1), Dexter (1), dgudema (1), youkrst (1), John Tidball (1), Chris OConnor (1), Cattleman (1), magicwonder (1), Flann 5 (1), Saffron (1), J A Jackson (1), geo (1)




BookTalk.org is a free book discussion group or online reading group or book club. We read and talk about both fiction and non-fiction books as a group. We host live author chats where booktalk members can interact with and interview authors. We give away free books to our members in book giveaway contests. Our booktalks are open to everybody who enjoys talking about books. Our book forums include book reviews, author interviews and book resources for readers and book lovers. Discussing books is our passion. We're a literature forum, or reading forum. Register a free book club account today! Suggest nonfiction and fiction books. Authors and publishers are welcome to advertise their books or ask for an author chat or author interview.


Navigation 
MAIN NAVIGATION

HOMEFORUMSBOOKSTRANSCRIPTSOLD FORUMSADVERTISELINKSFAQDONATETERMS OF USEPRIVACY POLICY

BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
King Henry IV, Part 1 - by William ShakespeareAtheist Mind, Humanist Heart - by Lex Bayer and John FigdorSense and Goodness Without God - by Richard CarrierFrankenstein - by Mary ShelleyThe Big Questions - by Simon BlackburnScience Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

OTHER PAGES WORTH EXPLORING
Banned Book ListOur Amazon.com SalesMassimo Pigliucci Rationally SpeakingOnline Reading GroupTop 10 Atheism BooksFACTS Book Selections

Copyright © BookTalk.org 2002-2014. All rights reserved.
Website developed by MidnightCoder.ca
Display Pagerank