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Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole 
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Post Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
http://www.the-office.com/bedtime-story ... lice-1.htm

Alice's Adventures In Wonderland
Chapter I - Down the Rabbit-Hole

Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, `and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice `without pictures or conversation?'

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so VERY remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so VERY much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, `Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' ..(when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural).

But when the Rabbit actually TOOK A WATCH OUT OF ITS WAISTCOAT- POCKET, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before see a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next.

First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs.
She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled `ORANGE MARMALADE', but to her great disappointment it was empty. She did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.
.
`Well!' thought Alice to herself, `after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!' (Which was very likely true.)

Down,
_______down,
_____________down.
Would the fall NEVER come to an end! `I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?' she said aloud. `I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) `--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?' (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.)

Presently she began again. `I wonder if I shall fall right THROUGH the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think--' (she was rather glad there WAS no one listening, this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) `--but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?' (and she tried to curtsey as she spoke--fancy CURTSEYING as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) `And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.'
Down,
_____down,
_________down.
There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) `I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?'

And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, `Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?' and sometimes, `Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it.

She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, `Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?' when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it.

There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, `Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!'

She was close behind it when she turned to corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.

Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice's first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them.

However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!

Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but
she could not even get her head though the doorway; `and even if my head would go through,' thought poor Alice, `it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin.' For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.
There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it, (`which certainly was not here before,' said Alice,) and round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words beautifully printed on it in large letters.

It was all very well to say `Drink me,' but the wise little Alice was not going to do THAT in a hurry. `No, I'll look first,' she said, `and see whether it's marked "poison" or not'; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they WOULD not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if your hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger VERY deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked `poison,' it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.

However, this bottle was NOT marked `poison,' so Alice ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice, (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast,) she very soon finished it off.

`What a curious feeling!' said Alice; `I must be shutting up like a telescope.'

And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high, and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now the right size for going though the little door into that lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this; `for it might end, you know,' said Alice to herself, `in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?' And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing.

After a while, finding that nothing more happened, she decided on going into the garden at once; but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found he had forgotten the little golden key, and when she went back to the table for it, she found she could not possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of the table, but it was too slippery; and when she had tired herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and cried.

`Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; `I advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. `But it's no use now,' thought poor Alice, `to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make ONE respectable
person!'

Soon her eye fell on a little glass box that was lying under the table: she opened it, and found in it a very small cake, on which the words were beautifully marked in currants. `Well, I'll eat it,' said Alice, `and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way I'll get into the garden, and I don't care which happens!'

She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, `Which way? Which way?', holding her hand on the top of her head to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite surprised to find that she remained the same size: to be sure, this generally happens when one eats cake, but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way.

So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake.



Last edited by Robert Tulip on Fri Oct 23, 2009 7:03 am, edited 2 times in total.



Sun Oct 18, 2009 5:20 am
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Lewis Carroll wrote:
And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, `Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?' and sometimes, `Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it.


This idea seems interesting to me. I'm not sure whether I think it's true or not. It seems like even if we can't answer a question now, how we ask it and how we think about might affect our chances of answering it in the future.

What do you think?

Lewis Carroll wrote:
She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, `Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?' when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.


Have you ever dreamed you were falling asleep?

The first time she looks around the hall of doors, there's nothing there. The second time, she finds the glass table with the key that doesn't fit any doors. When she looks at the doors more closely, she finds the door that fits the key. What is the significance of her having to look twice? Is it the idea that we must look deeply to understand what we're seeing or is it that dreams change each time we look so we should keep looking until the dream gives us what we what? Or something else?

Lewis Carroll wrote:
`Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; `I advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes; and once she remembered
trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. `But it's no use now,' thought poor Alice, `to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make ONE respectable
person!'


I think this is a remarkable paragraph although I'm a little uncertain what to make of it. Is the writer being silly to play for humor, or is there a deeper point here?



Sun Oct 18, 2009 6:38 am
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I really like Sir John Tenniel's drawings. I am not really sure, exactly, why I like them. They are just so soothing. They just seem to go with the story. The copy I found online adds them to the story. The story cannot be told without the drawings.

Here is the book online:

http://www.literature.org/authors/carro ... index.html



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Oh, Robert already provided a link. :)



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Post 
I'm going to join you guys in reading this one.



Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:33 am
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It's a fun story. :)



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There is a chthonic dimension to Down the Rabbit Hole - into the earth like Persephone taken to Hades by Pluto or Jules Verne's Otto Lidenbrock in A Journey to the Centre of the Earth or Neo in The Matrix or even Bilbo Baggins in Hobbiton and the Misty Mountains.

Loved the bit about falling right through the earth to the 'antipathies' in Australia where people walk on their heads. Like Old Father William.

I drew on this myth for a book review I wrote a few years ago of Submerge - Living Deep in a Shallow World by Ashley Barker & John B. Hayes GO Alliance , 2002

Just to illustrate how 'down the rabbit hole' has entered popular culture in a way that offers plenty of scope for analysis, my review of Submerge open with lines from the movie The Matrix, which itself consciously draws from a range of mythic sources.


"After this there is no turning back. You take the blue pill, the story ends. You wake up from your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill, you stay in wonderland and I show you how far the rabbit hole goes."



Last edited by Robert Tulip on Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Post Alice
Thank you Robert for the links. This should be a very interesting discussion. I'm glad you added it Chris! :smile:



Mon Oct 19, 2009 7:12 am
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Post Re: Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
Quote:
And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing.


The flame disappears, but I suppose a bit of heat might remain for a few seconds......like the smile of the Cheshire Cat.

Quote:
It was all very well to say `Drink me,' but the wise little Alice was not going to do THAT in a hurry. `No, I'll look first,' she said, `and see whether it's marked "poison" or not'; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they WOULD not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if your hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger VERY deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked `poison,' it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.


Oh clever old Lewis Caroll. When I first read Alice I was filled with such confidence because I knew that I red hot poker would burn you instantly, never mind holding it for any length; that ones finger bleeds even if cut quite shallowly, and that a bottle marked 'poison' could do much more than disagree with you. It is so encouraging for a child to feel she has superior knowledge, one instantly doesn't feel patronised, even though the good advice is assimilated. Caroll definitely had a 'way' with children, I feel sure.


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Thu Nov 19, 2009 11:44 am
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Post Re: Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
Being a total "Alice Virgin", I'm halfway through and biting off both sides of the mushroom trying to decided whether I'm simply having a jolly good time with it or contemplating whether a passage has deeper meaning and if so, what is it. I find myself becoming very small again and looking at the world , albeit fantasy world, with wonder. And then the adult (having bitten off too much of the cake and proceeded growing) comes back to try to be logical and uncover the deeper meaning.
One of the main guidelines in literature is to check and see if the author is being true to the world he/she creates. And Carroll certainly does. I'm enjoying this immensely!
Ooooh.....now I have seen the Matrix and finally understand the pills, their colors and the rabbit hole theme! Thank you!


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Post Re: Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
It's hard to decide whether "Alice" attracts us because of "deeper meaning" that a child wouldn't see, or because it always awakens the child in us. The first chapter is the most magical in the book. I tend to see it as maybe the most successful evocation in literature (as far as I've read) of the dream state, with its illogicality and random but important meanings. Also I see it as reflecting the child's concerns about identity, which Carroll was perhaps the first to really think about. He took children seriously, in that sense.


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Wed Dec 16, 2009 9:21 am
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Post Re: Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
Yes! Children are always concerned with identity, teenagers even more so. But you know what struck me? When the griffon and the mock turtle are carrying on their discussion, there is a rather humourous disclaimer from Carroll not wanting to be connected with the book. Gee, will have to look up that quote as I don't have it in my head at the moment. And actually, I love the whole chapter with its puns and word-play.


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Wed Dec 16, 2009 1:40 pm
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Post Re: Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
DWill wrote:
It's hard to decide whether "Alice" attracts us because of "deeper meaning" that a child wouldn't see, or because it always awakens the child in us. The first chapter is the most magical in the book. I tend to see it as maybe the most successful evocation in literature (as far as I've read) of the dream state, with its illogicality and random but important meanings. Also I see it as reflecting the child's concerns about identity, which Carroll was perhaps the first to really think about. He took children seriously, in that sense.
Thanks Bill, this is a sound and astute analysis of the dream-like quality of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Deconstructing the meaning of the dream images, we can see that the 'Drink Me' bottle of size-altering magic potion stands for the emergence of modern chemistry and physics, both the transformative power of chemicals and the recognition of orders of magnitude in physics, from the atom to the universe. Old Father William is my favourite. Hailing from the Antipathies deep below Wonderland, Bill lives upside down, standing on his head for his health. The walrus and the carpenter are archetypes of the colonial experience. The walrus is fat colonel blimp, while the carpenter is his practical sidekick. They eat the oysters without noticing, much as England ate the world by establishing the British Empire.

Analysis of the dream visions of Alice in Wonderland requires entry into a child-like naivete and innocence, a theme we discussed here on Booktalk as appearing strongly in the famous English children's story The Secret Garden.

__________ 27 Dec 2009 07:39 __________

The theme 'Down the Rabbit Hole' provides a memetic English appropriation and reflection of deep old myths of descent into the earth.

The Greeks have the descent of Odysseus and of Orpheus into Hades to meet Pluto the God of Death. Christianity has the descent of Christ into hell after his death on the cross.

The meme of the descent into the earth comes originally from the shamanic practice of lucid dreaming to imagine tunnels into the earth as a main method of traditional medicine.

Religion and fiction find a need to incorporate this idea into their stories. Lewis Carroll represents a Victorian British perspective, where tales of primitive tribes were circulating among anthropologists, and the idea of descent also had a respectable orthodox imperial pedigree in the stories of Christ and Ulysses. Carroll borrows the mythic meme of the tunnel into the earth to provide a framework for his imaginary satire.

I get the feeling that this mythic resonance is a big part of why Alice in Underland strikes such a popular chord.



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Post Re: Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
I don't think I started "emotionally" connecting with Alice until I became an adult and developed panic disorder. I liked this story as a child, as one of the posters above said, it's a fun story. When I read it as a child, I could come to the story with a childlike (non panic) perspective so it was a fun story for me at that point. My panic disorder makes me have periods of unreality and there is a lot (IMO) of unreality in this story. You know periods where Alice is confused and everything seems backwards or somehow not quite right. These parts effect me strongly now where they didn't hold any particular meaning for me before.


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Post Re: Alice Chapter One Down the Rabbit Hole
I agree with cakeheart222 in finding the book to be much more emotional when read as an adult. I re-read this when my son was 5 yo and found it too surrealistic and disturbing to be considered a "children's book". I ended up reading it to him on a boring, rainy afternoon when he was 6 and he loved it, obviously seeing this and Through the Looking Glass as wonderfully fun and silly. The idea of escaping down the rabbit hole sounds like a great adventure to many six year old children, and reading this again with a child helped me to appreciate the fun and not focus as much on the anxious feelings I had had earlier.



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BOOK FORUMS FOR ALL BOOKS WE HAVE DISCUSSED
Science Was Born of Christianity - by Stacy TrasancosThe Happiness Hypothesis - by Jonathan HaidtA Game of Thrones - by George R. R. MartinTempesta's Dream - by Vincent LoCocoWhy Nations Fail - by Daron Acemoglu and James RobinsonThe Drowning Girl - Caitlin R. KiernanThe Consolations of the Forest - by Sylvain TessonThe Complete Heretic's Guide to Western Religion: The Mormons - by David FitzgeraldA Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - by James JoyceThe Divine Comedy - by Dante AlighieriThe Magic of Reality - by Richard DawkinsDubliners - by James JoyceMy Name Is Red - by Orhan PamukThe World Until Yesterday - by Jared DiamondThe Man Who Was Thursday - by by G. K. ChestertonThe Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven PinkerLord Jim by Joseph ConradThe Hobbit by J. R. R. TolkienThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandThinking, Fast and Slow - by Daniel KahnemanThe Righteous Mind - by Jonathan HaidtWorld War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max BrooksMoby Dick: or, the Whale by Herman MelvilleA Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer EganLost Memory of Skin: A Novel by Russell BanksThe Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. KuhnHobbes: Leviathan by Thomas HobbesThe House of the Spirits - by Isabel AllendeArguably: Essays by Christopher HitchensThe Falls: A Novel (P.S.) by Joyce Carol OatesChrist in Egypt by D.M. MurdockThe Glass Bead Game: A Novel by Hermann HesseA Devil's Chaplain by Richard DawkinsThe Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph CampbellThe Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor DostoyevskyThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark TwainThe Moral Landscape by Sam HarrisThe Decameron by Giovanni BoccaccioThe Road by Cormac McCarthyThe Grand Design by Stephen HawkingThe Evolution of God by Robert WrightThe Tin Drum by Gunter GrassGood Omens by Neil GaimanPredictably Irrational by Dan ArielyThe Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel by Haruki MurakamiALONE: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan & Tere Duperrault FassbenderDon Quixote by Miguel De CervantesMusicophilia by Oliver SacksDiary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai GogolThe Passion of the Western Mind by Richard TarnasThe Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le GuinThe Genius of the Beast by Howard BloomAlice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Empire of Illusion by Chris HedgesThe Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Extended Phenotype by Richard DawkinsSmoke and Mirrors by Neil GaimanThe Selfish Gene by Richard DawkinsWhen Good Thinking Goes Bad by Todd C. RinioloHouse of Leaves by Mark Z. DanielewskiAmerican Gods: A Novel by Neil GaimanPrimates and Philosophers by Frans de WaalThe Enormous Room by E.E. CummingsThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeGod Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher HitchensThe Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Dreams From My Father by Barack Obama Paradise Lost by John Milton Bad Money by Kevin PhillipsThe Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson BurnettGodless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists by Dan BarkerThe Things They Carried by Tim O'BrienThe Limits of Power by Andrew BacevichLolita by Vladimir NabokovOrlando by Virginia Woolf On Being Certain by Robert A. Burton50 reasons people give for believing in a god by Guy P. HarrisonWalden: Or, Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauExile and the Kingdom by Albert CamusOur Inner Ape by Frans de WaalYour Inner Fish by Neil ShubinNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthyThe Age of American Unreason by Susan JacobyTen Theories of Human Nature by Leslie Stevenson & David HabermanHeart of Darkness by Joseph ConradThe Stuff of Thought by Stephen PinkerA Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniThe Lucifer Effect by Philip ZimbardoResponsibility and Judgment by Hannah ArendtInterventions by Noam ChomskyGodless in America by George A. RickerReligious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. HaimanDeep Economy by Phil McKibbenThe God Delusion by Richard DawkinsThe Third Chimpanzee by Jared DiamondThe Woman in the Dunes by Abe KoboEvolution vs. Creationism by Eugenie C. ScottThe Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael PollanI, Claudius by Robert GravesBreaking The Spell by Daniel C. DennettA Peace to End All Peace by David FromkinThe Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey NiffeneggerThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisEnder's Game by Orson Scott CardThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonValue and Virtue in a Godless Universe by Erik J. WielenbergThe March by E. L DoctorowThe Ethical Brain by Michael GazzanigaFreethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan JacobyCollapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared DiamondThe Battle for God by Karen ArmstrongThe Future of Life by Edward O. WilsonWhat is Good? by A. C. GraylingCivilization and Its Enemies by Lee HarrisPale Blue Dot by Carl SaganHow We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God by Michael ShermerLooking for Spinoza by Antonio DamasioLies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al FrankenThe Red Queen by Matt RidleyThe Blank Slate by Stephen PinkerUnweaving the Rainbow by Richard DawkinsAtheism: A Reader edited by S.T. JoshiGlobal Brain by Howard BloomThe Lucifer Principle by Howard BloomGuns, Germs and Steel by Jared DiamondThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownFuture Shock by Alvin Toffler

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